Archive for the ‘Colonial Revival’ Category

Telephone Building, Waterbury (1930)

Sunday, May 18th, 2014 Posted in Colonial Revival, Commercial Buildings, Waterbury | Comments Off

Telephone Building, Waterbury

The Telephone Building (now AT&T) at 348 Grand Street in Waterbury was built in 1930. Designed in the Georgian Revival style by Douglas Orr, the building’s cornice and entrance have Art-Deco foliated decoration.

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Knight-Whaples-Grant Cottage (1871)

Friday, May 16th, 2014 Posted in Colonial Revival, Houses, Old Saybrook, Shingle Style | Comments Off

Grant Cottage

The summer cottage at 25 Pettipaug Avenue in the Borough of Fenwick in Old Saybrook was built circa 1871 on land sold that year to Mrs. Cyrus Knight. Her husband, Rev. Cyrus Frederick Wright was rector of the Church of the Incarnation (later renamed St. James’ Episcopal Church) in Hartford from 1870 to 1877. He resigned after an incident in which church funds were stolen by the parish treasurer. Rev. Knight then served as rector of St. James Church in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, from 1877 to 1889, but continued to summer in Fenwick. When he became Bishop of Milwaukee in 1889, he and his wife could no longer make the long trip to Fenwick and therefore rented the cottage for the summer. Rev. Knight died in 1891 and his wife, Elizabeth P. Pickering Knight, in 1912. The cottage was then owned for a time by Heywood Whaples. It was purchased in 1952 by Ellsworth Grant (1917-2013) and his wife, Marion Hepburn Grant (1918-1986), the sister of Katharine Hepburn. The cottage has later rear additions. You can read more about the cottage in Marion Hepburn Grant’s The Fenwick Story (Connecticut Historical Society, 1974), pages 128-131.

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Terryville Public Library (1922)

Monday, April 14th, 2014 Posted in Colonial Revival, Libraries, Plymouth | Comments Off

Terryville Public Library

In 1839, thirty citizens of the Town of Plymouth (which includes Terryville), organized the Terryville Lyceum Library, a private subscription library. Interest dwindled after the Civil War, but near the turn of the century a new group of townspeople established the Terryville Free Public Library, which received the donation of all of the Lyceum Library’s books and 52 books from Francis Atwater, author of the History of the Town of Plymouth (1895). Initially the library was housed in the Town Hall courtroom and then for a time in a room in the old Main Street School before a demand for classroom space forced a relocation back to the Town Hall. The library finally got its own building, at 238 Main Street in Terryville, in 1922. An addition to the library was constructed in 1975.

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Brookside (1898)

Saturday, April 12th, 2014 Posted in Cheshire, Colonial Revival, Craftsman, Houses | Comments Off

500 South Brooksvale Road, Cheshire

The house at 500 South Brooksvale Road in Cheshire combines elements of the Colonial Revival and Craftsman styles. Known as Brookside, it was built in 1898 as a summer cottage for Peter Palmer of Brooklyn.

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Clark-Speake-Hotchkiss House (1880)

Friday, April 11th, 2014 Posted in Cheshire, Colonial Revival, Houses | Comments Off

108 Cornwall Ave., Cheshire

The house at 108 Cornwall Avenue in Cheshire was built in the 1880s by James Gardner Clark. It was sold to James M. Speake in 1905 and then to Susan Hotchkiss in 1909. The house was used to board students of Cheshire Academy in the 1940s and 1950s.

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Glastenbury Knitting Company Houses (1920)

Thursday, April 10th, 2014 Posted in Colonial Revival, Glastonbury, Houses | Comments Off

22-24 Addison Rd., Glastonbury

26-28 Addison Rd., Glastonbury

The two identical houses at 22-24 and 26-28 Addison Road in Glastonbury were built c. 1920 as mill worker tenements by the Glastenbury Knitting Company. The company, which manufactured underwear, used an older spelling of the town’s name. These tenement houses were built in the then-popular Dutch Colonial style, featuring gambrel roofs. The mill eventually sold off the houses in the 1930s.

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Thomaston Post Office (1937)

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014 Posted in Colonial Revival, Public Buildings, Thomaston | Comments Off

Thomaston Post Office

The Post Office at 150 Main Street in Thomaston (pdf) was built in 1937 and was dedicated in 1938. The building features a WPA/New Deal-era mural, “Early Clock Making,” painted in 1939 by Lucerne and Suzanne McCullough, twin sisters from New Orleans.

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