Archive for the ‘Hotels’ Category

Bushnell Kirtland House (1810)

Monday, June 12th, 2017 Posted in Federal Style, Hotels, Old Saybrook | No Comments »

The house at 110 North Cove Road in Old Saybrook, built c. 1810, has a Federal-style central bay with a Palladian window and an elaborate entry (the elongated doorway surround may represent an early twentieth-century alteration to accommodate a newer fanlight over the door). The house was built by Bushnell Kirtland, a shipbuilder. His brother, Asa Kirtland, built the nearby house at 100 North Cove Road in 1805.

Grantmoor Motor Lodge (1959)

Friday, May 5th, 2017 Posted in Hotels, Modern, Newington | No Comments »

When it opened in 1959, the stylishly modern Grantmoor Motor Lodge, 3000 Berlin Turnpike in Newington, was billed as “Gracious Grantmoor” and offered travelers a pool, golf course and restaurant/banquet hall (the latter added in 1960). When I-91 was built in 1965 it bypassed traffic away from the Turnpike and the Grantmoor soon switched to a more adult theme that included mirrors on the ceilings. Read the rest of this entry »

Winthrop House (1848)

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2017 Posted in Hotels, Italianate, Norwalk | No Comments »

The building that is called Winthrop House, at 166 Rowayton Avenue in Rowayton, Norwalk, was built in 1848 by Charles L. Raymond as a a four-story summer hotel. It has had many names, being called the Fairview Hotel by the turn of the century. It was a private home around the time of World War I, but then became a hotel again under various names over the years: Colonial Inn (1926), Pleasant Inn (1930) and Rowayton Inn (1935). During the Second World War it was purchased by the Bassler brothers. At the start of the twenty-first century there were plans to demolish the building, but in 2005 the Norwalk Preservation Trust worked with developer Andrew Glazer, the Rowayton Historical Society, the Rowayton Community Association and the Norwalk Planning and Zoning Office to restore the exterior to its nineteenth-century appearance. The interior was converted into three luxury condominiums.

Crocker House (1872)

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016 Posted in Hotels, Italianate, New London | No Comments »

Crocker House

The Crocker House is a five-story luxury hotel built at 180 State Street in New London in 1872. The project was inspired by A. N. Ramsdell, president of the New London Railroad and the New London City Bank. The hotel was named for Henry Scudder Crocker, its first proprietor, who who was also the manager of the elite Pequot House summer resort. The Crocker House‘s Mansard-roofed top floor was later destroyed in a fire. An addition to the building, designed by architect James Sweeney, was erected in 1914. Playwright Eugene O’Neill could often be found in the hotel’s bar. Today the former hotel is the Crocker House Apartments. Read the rest of this entry »

Hudson House (1814)

Monday, July 11th, 2016 Posted in Federal Style, Hotels, Oxford | No Comments »

Hudson House

Known as the Hudson House, the house at 430 Oxford Road in Oxford was built c. 1814 by Timothy Candee, who also built a nearly identical house next door at 426 Oxford Road. A Revolutionary War veteran, Candee also built the nearby Congregational Church for the Ecclesiastical Society of Oxford. His brothers, Daniel and Job, built the Oxford Hotel on the other side of Oxford Road.

Hurd-Osborn-Oatman House (1806)

Wednesday, June 15th, 2016 Posted in Federal Style, Hotels, Houses, Southbury, Taverns & Inns | No Comments »

George Thompson House (1806)

Located at 1531 Southford Road in the village of Southford in Southbury, the Hurd-Osborn-Oatman House was built in 1806 by George Thompson as a hotel. As explained by John L. Rockey in the second volume of his History of New Haven County, Connecticut (1892):

In the period of time when the turnpike was the great thoroughfare between New Haven and Litchfield, Southford being 20 miles from the former place and 25 miles from the latter, hotels were here kept and were well patronized. [. . . ] The hotel known as the Oatman House for 35 years, was built by George Thompson in 1806, and first kept by him and then by his brother-in-law, Benjamin S. Hurd, followed by John Peck. Enos Foot was the landlord in 1845.

George Thompson and Benjamin Smith Hurd married two sisters, Clarissa and Esther, daughters of Adin Wheeler, who helped to fund construction of the hotel. The hotel had many owners over the years. Benjamin Blagg Osborn, son of merchant and Revolutionary War patriot Shadrach Osborn, was tavern-keeper in the 1820s. Charles R. Oatman (1827-1904), under whose name the hotel was long known, acquired the property in 1870. Oatman married Orinda T. Hurd, daughter of Benjamin R. Hurd, in 1850. The Oatman family owned the hotel until 1899 and even under later owners it was still known for many years as the C. R. Oatman Hotel. It later became the Fennbrock Dairy.

Bidwell Hotel (1822)

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015 Posted in Coventry, Greek Revival, Hotels | No Comments »

Bidwell Hotel, Coventry

In 1822 Solomon Bidwell built a three-floor hotel at 1220 Main Street in Coventry. After Solomon died in 1858, his son Nathan Lyman ran the business, adding a wing to expand the hotel. When Nathan L. Bidwell died in 1877, it passed to his son Charles (died 1881) and then to Charles’ widow Lydia (died 1918). The hotel ceased operating in 1938. The Greek Revival building has a Colonial Revival two-story open porch across its front facade, added in the early twentieth century.