Archive for the ‘Colonial Revival’ Category

Wethersfield United Methodist Church (1959)

Sunday, June 11th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Colonial Revival, Wethersfield | No Comments »

Jesse Lee, a pioneering Methodist clergyman, preached the first Methodist sermon in Connecticut in Norwalk in June, 1789. He continued his journey through the state, preaching in various towns, and reached Wethersfield in March, 1790. There he preached the town’s first Methodist Sermon in the North Brick School House, now the site of Standish Park. Itinerant Methodist preachers continued to visit Wethersfield in the ensuing years. Starting in 1821, Wethersfield Methodists were served by a circuit preacher. As related in a Brief Historical Sketch of the Wethersfield M.E. Church (1882):

The early services were held in Academy hall, against the solemn protest of some of the leading men of the town, who no doubt thought they were doing God service by resisting what might have seemed to them as a pernicious innovation of the established creed of the State. So bitter was the feeling toward the Methodists that the place where the meeting was appointed was not only forbidden them, but the building was barricaded, and the means for lighting it were taken away. Great indignation was manifested among the people who had assembled, and an officer of the town was detailed to read the riot act and bid them disperse.

But those friends of the church in the early days were not men who were easily discouraged. Persevering in their purpose they gained access to the hall, and when Mr. Pease was about to open the meeting, an officer appeared at the door and ordered the people away under penalty of the law. Mr. Pease, holding the only candle in the hall, boldly replied, “We have not come here for any riot, but to serve the living God; let us pray.” The meeting then proceeded without further trouble, and proved productive of much good.

The town’s first Methodist Church building, now Temple Beth Torah, was erected on Main Street in 1824. The building, moved 26 feet onto a new stone foundation, was much enlarged and rebuilt in the Queen Anne style in 1882. The Wethersfield United Methodist Church erected a new church building, at 150 Prospect Street, in 1959. A 2005 addition serves as the church’s Family Life Center.

Richard J. Wooldridge House (1912)

Friday, June 9th, 2017 Posted in American Foursquare, Colonial Revival, Glastonbury, Houses | No Comments »

The two-family house at 11-13 Naubuc Avenue in Glastonbury was built in 1912 by Richard J. Wooldridge (born c. 1879), a plumber. He and his family occupied one half of the house and rented out the other half.

Newell Jennings House (1917)

Wednesday, May 10th, 2017 Posted in Bristol, Colonial Revival, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 4 Oakland Street in Bristol was built in 1917 and came to be well-known as an exemplar of the Colonial/Georgian Revival style after it was featured in the Christmas 1920 issue of House Beautiful (“An Adaptation of the Colonial House,” by Alexander E. Hoyle). Designed by Goodell & Root, the house was built for Newell Jennings (1883-1965), who (starting in 1910) practiced law with his uncle, Roger S. Newell, in the firm of Newell & Jennings. The year the house was built, Jennings was appointed assistant state attorney. He was later a Hartford Superior Court judge.

Capt. Dolbeare House (1855)

Saturday, May 6th, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Greek Revival, Houses, Old Saybrook | No Comments »

The Capt. Dolbeare House, located at 70 North Cove Road in Old Saybrook, is an 1855 ship captain’s home. The house was enlarged and remodeled in 1931, at which time the two-story colonnade on the west gable end was most likely added. The house was renovated by developer John Aldi in the 1990s.

Madison Post Office (1940)

Thursday, May 4th, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Madison, Public Buildings | No Comments »

The United States Post Office in Madison (781 Boston Post Road) was completed in 1940. Inside is a New Deal era mural called “Gathering Seaweed from the Sound,” painted by William Abbott Cheever in 1940. The building and mural were created using Treasury Department funds.

Hall Block, Southport (1895)

Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Commercial Buildings, Fairfield | No Comments »

On December 31, 1894, a fire in Southport destroyed the commercial/tenement building at the corner of Main Street and Harbor Road in Southport. Known as the Hall Block (possibly built in 1874), it was soon rebuilt in the Italianate style, with shops on the first floor and apartments above. The building, located at 252 Main Street with a flatiron form, was later altered converted in the Colonial Revival style into condominiums.

South Congregational Church, Granby (1918)

Sunday, April 16th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Colonial Revival, Granby | No Comments »

Happy Easter! Granby‘s South Congregational Church was organized on Salmon Brook Street in 1872. Originally called the Congregational Society of Salmon Brook, it met in a hall on the second floor of a building erected for the Granby Library Association in 1869. This structure, later also used as a Town House, burned down in 1917. While one newspaper editor suggested that it was time for the South Church to merge with Granby’s First Congregational Church, this notion conflicted with local beautification plans aimed at developing Salmon Brook as an ideal New England village. The Church and the Town worked together to erect a complex of four community buildings in the Colonial Revival style: the new Church, the Church’s Community House (also available to local groups not affiliated with the Church), a schoolhouse and a library. The 1918 Church was designed by the H. Wales Lines Company of Meriden. The gable-roofed, transverse section at the rear, designed by Carl R. Blanchard, Jr. of New Haven, was added in 1950.