William Welles House (1750)

Thursday, June 4th, 2015 Posted in Colonial, Glastonbury, Houses | No Comments »

1559 Main St., Glastonbury

The house at 1559 Main Street in Glastonbury was the home of William Welles, a prominent citizen of the town. Welles was a tutor at Yale. During the Revolutionary War, when students were dispersed away from New Haven, Yale classes were held in the house (May 1777 to June 1778). Welles left Glastonbury c. 1798 and the house was acquired by Joseph Stephens, who operated a forge behind the house near the river. Originally having a saltbox form, the house was later expanded and updated in the Georgian style. It also has a later Greek Revival front doorway.

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Jared Cone House (1800)

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015 Posted in Bolton, Federal Style, Houses | No Comments »

Jared Cone House

Jared Cone Sr. (1733-1807) of Bolton married Christiana Loomis on September 19, 1754. He purchased the Loomis farm in Bolton by 1768. Jared Cone and his son, Jared Cone, Jr., both served in the Revolutionary War. The father marched with the militia from Bolton to the Lexington Alarm in 1775 and the son was at the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown in 1781. Jared Cone, Jr. married Elisabeth Wells of Wethersfield in 1784. He acquired his father’s farm in 1790 and ten years later built a Federal-style house at what is now 25 Hebron Road. The house‘s rear ell appears to be much earlier, dating perhaps to c. 1755. Cone could only afford to live in the grand house for four years, eventually selling it and moving away (he died in New Hampshire). For about eight years the house was a bed and breakfast until it closed in 2003.

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Jedediah Elderkin House (1710)

Monday, November 17th, 2014 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Windham | No Comments »

Col. Jedediah Elderkin House

Born in Norwich in 1717, Jedediah Elderkin graduated from Yale and studied law. He settled with his family in Windham in 1745. Elderkin and his next door neighbor and friend, Eliphalet Dyer, were the leading lawyers at the time in eastern Connecticut. Elderkin served many terms in the General Assembly and as Justice of the Peace. He was also a large landowner and manufacturer, notable as a pioneer of silk production in Connecticut. With the coming of the Revolutionary War, Elderkin became a member of the Governor’s Council of Safety and was commissioned as Colonel of the Fifth Regiment of the Connecticut Militia. A close associate of Governor John Trumbull, he undertook many difficult missions, including the conversion of a foundry in Salisbury into a cannon works and the building of a gunowder mill at Willimantic. Elderkin‘s last public service, before his death in 1793, was to attend the state convention which ratified the Constitution of the United States. His house in Windham, at 11 North Road, was built circa 1710. It has several eighteenth and nineteenth century additions.

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Eliphalet Dyer House (1715)

Wednesday, August 27th, 2014 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Windham | No Comments »

Col. Eliphalet Dyer House

Col. Eliphalet Dyer (1721-1807) was one of Connecticut’s notable figures from the period of the Revolutionary War. Born in Windham, he graduated from Yale in 1740 and in 1746 became a lawyer and a Justice of the Peace. Dyer was a founder and leader of the Susquehannah Company, which focused on settling the Wyoming Valley in northeastern Pennsylvania. During the French and Indian War, Dyer was a Lt. Colonel in the militia as part of the expedition to capture Fort Crown Point from the French in 1755 and then, as a Colonel in 1758, he led a regiment in support of Amherst’s and Wolfe’s operations in Canada. Dyer served in the Connecticut legislature from 1742 to 1784 and in the Continental Congress from 1774 to 1783 (except for 1776 and 1779). Appointed to the Council of Safety in 1775, Dyer served until it was disbanded in 1783. Dyer’s daughter Amelia was married to Joseph Trumbull, who also served in the Continental Congress. A justice of Connecticut’s superior court, Eliphalet Dyer was Chief Justice from 1789 until 1793, when he retired to Windham. His home there was a colonial house (17 North Road) built circa 1705-1715.

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Elihu Kent, Jr. House (1786)

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Suffield | No Comments »

Elihu Kent, Jr. House

The house at 161 South Main Street in Suffield was built circa 1786-1787 by Elihu Kent, Jr. (1757-1813). He was the son of Elihu Kent (1733-1814), who was captain of a militia company from Suffield that set out in answer to the Lexington Alarm in 1775. Elihu, Sr. was promoted to major in 1777. Serving with him in the militia was Titus Kent, who was owned by Elihu Kent as a slave. According to volume III of the History of the Western Reserve, by Harriet Taylor Upton, Elihu. Sr.’s son, Colonel Elihu Kent, Jr.

married Elizabeth Fitch, of Lebanon, Connecticut. He was also in the Revolutionary army with his father, and was captured by the British on Long Island and confined for a long time as a prisoner of war in the old “Sugar Housein New York, where he suffered greatly. He was a farmer after the Revolution and kept a tavern at Suffield, Connecticut. He was survived by four children.

A window from the old Sugar House survives in New York City today.

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Ebenezer Bulkley House (1750)

Saturday, January 4th, 2014 Posted in Colonial, Fairfield, Houses | No Comments »

349 Beach Rd., Fairfield

The saltbox house at 349 Beach Road in Fairfield was built before 1750. The residence of Ebenezer Peter Bulkeley, it is one of the few houses to survive the burning of Fairfield by the British in 1779.

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Howell-Baldwin House (1757)

Thursday, July 18th, 2013 Posted in Ansonia, Colonial, Houses | 2 Comments »

Howell-Baldwin House

The house at 79 Elm Street in Ansonia was built in 1754 by Joseph Howell. It was later the home of Dr. Silas Baldwin (1729-1813), Derby’s third physician (Ansonia was at that time part of the town of Derby). He married Mary Plumb of Ridgefield in 1755. According to the Sixth Report of the National Society of the Daughter of the American Revolution (1904):

Dr. Silas Baldwin, Revolutionary patriot […] Assisted in establishing American independence while acting in the capacity of a patriot. He accepted the oath of fidelity to the United States April 13, 1778. Dr. Silas Baldwin enlisted June, 1776, in Captain Johnson’s company Fifth Battalion, Wadsworth’s brigade, Colonel Douglas’s regiment to reenforce Washington’s army at New York; August 29-30, 1776, engaged in the retreat to New York; was at the battle of White Plains October 28. Term expired December 26. (History of Derby, p. 187.)

No. 24 on muster roll of Capt. Elijah Humphrey’s company, Connecticut Regiment of Foot, commanded by Col. Return Jonathan Meigs, was Silas Baldwin, enlisting March 27,1777, “on command,” which maybe received in explanation of the record on page 208, Connecticut Men in the Revolution, which says: “Silas Baldwin in Humphrey’s company, Connecticut Line, enlisted March 27,1777; deserted August, 1779.” (Connecticut Men in the Revolution, pp. 208, 407; muster roll of Capt. Elijah Humphrey’s company. Copy deposited.)

Dr. Silas Baldwin was born in Waterbury and died in Ridgefield, but generally resided in the section of Derby that is now Ansonia. He is buried in Ansonia’s Colonial Cemetery. Read the rest of this entry »

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