Greenmanville Church (1851)

Sunday, January 14th, 2018 Posted in Churches, Greek Revival, Mystic, Stonington | No Comments »

The Greenmanville Church at Mystic Seaport was built in 1851 during the area’s heyday as a shipbuilding center. As related in Seventh Day Baptists in Europe and America, Vol. II (1910):

In 1838 three brothers, George, Clarke and Thomas S. Greenman, members of the First Hopkinton church, settled in Mystic, Conn., and commenced the ship-building business. Thirteen years later, 1849, they built a mill for the manufacture of woolen goods. About these industries sprang up a village called Greenmanville. The most of those working in the ship-yard were Sabbath-keepers, and being several miles removed from any Seventh-day Baptist church, it was deemed wise to organize one. This was done in August, 1850, with about forty members. The constituent members were mostly from the First Hopkinton church, a few from the Waterford church, and one from the Newport church. The largest membership, fifty-six, was reached the first year and it held pretty well up to this for thirty years. Its present (1902) number is eighteen.

Though it never enrolled a large number of members, yet it exercised a wide influence in denominational and other circles. George Greenman, a member of this church, was president of the Seventh-day Baptist Missionary Society for thirty-one years. The leading men of the church took an active part in the anti-slavery struggle, and the temperance cause has been supported by these godly men. Clarke Greenman, Thomas S. Greenman and Benjamin F. Langworthy served the town in the state legislature at different times.

The congregation was depleted with the decline of the shipyard in the 1870s and 1880s and the selling of the woolen mill to owners of another denomination. The church closed in 1904 and the building then served as a private residence and an apartment building before it was acquired by Mystic Seaport in 1955. The Seaport moved the church from its original site (near the current Visitor Center) to its present location. For a time, the church was called the Aloha Meetinghouse and was a nondenominational church. Mystic Seaport added the current tower clock, built in 1857 by the Howard Clock Company of Massachusetts. The clock is on loan from Yale, where it was once located in the Old South Sheffield Hall of the Sheffield Scientific School. Read the rest of this entry »

Connecticut Science Center (2009)

Monday, January 1st, 2018 Posted in Hartford, Museums, Postmodern | No Comments »

Happy New Year!! For New Year’s Day, here’s a relatively new “historic” building that’s become a modern Hartford landmark. The Connecticut Science Center, designed by C├ęsar Pelli, was erected as part of the city’s Adriaen’s Landing development. The Science Center is nine stories, 154,000 square feet and is the first science center to generate most of its power from an on-site fuel cell. The Center opened its doors in 2009.

Old Chaplin Town Hall – Chaplin Museum (1840)

Friday, December 22nd, 2017 Posted in Chaplin, Greek Revival, Public Buildings | No Comments »

At 1 Chaplin Street in Chaplin is a small Greek Revival building erected in 1840 as the Town Hall. The current Chaplin Town Hall is located at 495 Phoenixville Road. The old Town Hall is now the Chaplin Museum.

Keeney Schoolhouse (1751)

Saturday, December 2nd, 2017 Posted in Manchester, Schools, Vernacular | No Comments »

The Keeney Schoolhouse in Manchester was built around 1751 on Keeney Street. Little is known of its subsequent history until 1975, when the Town’s Bicentennial Committee voted to restore the building and relocate it to the grounds of the Cheney Homestead to become a museum, furnished and maintained by the Manchester Historical Society. The former schoolhouse had long been used as a farm building by that point and was in such a deteriorated condition that a restoration was not possible. Instead a replica was constructed, complete with rounded ceiling. It was rebuilt utilizing as much material from the original structure as possible.

Mystic Bank (1833)

Tuesday, November 21st, 2017 Posted in Banks, Greek Revival, Mystic, Stonington | No Comments »

Now located at Mystic Seaport, the Mystic Bank was originally built in 1833 in Old Mystic, at the head of the Mystic River. The first president of the bank was Elias Brown and the first cashier was George W. Noyes, who later held the same position at the Mystic River Bank. The Mystic Bank moved its operations to a new brick building in 1856. The first floor of the old bank building then became the post office and the upper floor was used as a carpenter’s shop. The building would be used for different purposes over the years until 1948-1951, when it was moved to Mystic Seaport. The current front portico is a reproduction of the original. Read the rest of this entry »

Old Town Hall, Bethany (1914)

Friday, November 10th, 2017 Posted in Bethany, Public Buildings, Vernacular | No Comments »

The building at 512 Amity Road in Bethany was erected in 1914 (with a small addition built in 1952) to serve as the Town Hall. In 1977, part of an elementary school on Peck Road was renovated for use as a new Town Hall. The old building on Amity Road was renamed the Stanley Downs Memorial Building to commemorate former First Selectman Stanley H. Downs (1906-1963). The Bethany Episcopal Church purchased the building from the town in 1980. In 1994, the church gave it to the new Bethany Historical Society, which had just been formed the year before. The Historical Society restored the building in 1995-1996 to become a museum.

Burrows House (1825)

Saturday, June 24th, 2017 Posted in Federal Style, Houses, Mystic, Stonington | No Comments »

The Burrows House at Mystic Seaport, built between 1805 and 1825, was originally erected on Water Street, on the Groton side of the Mystic River. In the 1860s and 1870s, it was the home of Seth and Jane Burrows. By that time the house had been raised above a new story in which Seth Winthrop Burrows sold groceries. The house was dismantled in 1953 to make way for a bank and then reassembled at Mystic Seaport. Read the rest of this entry »