John Twitchell House (1741)

Monday, September 18th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Oxford | No Comments »

John Twitchell, who in 1714 built what would become the Washband Tavern in Oxford, later erected another house in town, at what is now 7 Academy Road, in 1741. That same year, residents of Oxford petitioned the Connecticut General Assembly to form their own Ecclesiastical Society and the new congregation met at the Twitchell House before their new meeting house was erected next door in 1743. By 1804 a store had been added to the west side of the house. A Masonic Lodge was also organized in the house, which was the site of Oxford’s first post office when Walker Wilmot was appointed postmaster in 1807. Enos Candee bought the house in 1845 and extensively remodeled it. For several years, starting in 1903, the house was used by St. Peter’s Episcopal Church as a rectory.

Capt. Jessie Beebe House (1765)

Saturday, August 26th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Stonington | No Comments »

A plaque on the house located at 12 High Street in Stonington Borough indicates that it was built in 1765 and was the home of Capt. Jessie Beebe, “Master of a Packet Boat Running to New York.”

Burrows House (1825)

Saturday, June 24th, 2017 Posted in Federal Style, Houses, Mystic, Stonington | No Comments »

The Burrows House at Mystic Seaport, built between 1805 and 1825, was originally erected on Water Street, on the Groton side of the Mystic River. In the 1860s and 1870s, it was the home of Seth and Jane Burrows. By that time the house had been raised above a new story in which Seth Winthrop Burrows sold groceries. The house was dismantled in 1953 to make way for a bank and then reassembled at Mystic Seaport. Read the rest of this entry »

Abner Kirtland House (1767)

Monday, May 8th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Deep River, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 19 Union Street in Deep River was built c. 1767 by Lieut. Abner Kirtland (1745-1834). He was the son of Capt. Philip Kirtland (1693-1764), one of the first settlers of what would become Deep River. Abner Kirtland served in the Revolutionary War, being commissioned 1st Lt. in Col. William Worthington’s Regiment of the 7th Conn. Militia in 1780.

John McKinstry House (1730)

Thursday, December 8th, 2016 Posted in Colonial, Ellington, Houses | No Comments »

John McKinstry House

Rev. John McKinstry (1677-1754) was the first minister of Ellington’s Congregational Church. His house, most likely the oldest in Ellington, was built in 1730 and was moved to its present address at 85 Maple Street in 1815 from north of where the Hall Memorial Library was later built.

The Old Manse, Willington (1728)

Friday, December 2nd, 2016 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Willington | No Comments »

The Old Manse

The house at 4 Jared Sparks Road in Willington, built before 1739 (a twentieth-century owner determined a date of 1728), has been designated as the town’s oldest house. It may have been built by John Watson, one of the town’s original proprietors who owned the property in 1727. It later served as the Congregational Church parsonage until 1911.

Rev. Samuel Clark House (1759)

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016 Posted in Berlin, Colonial, Houses | No Comments »

Rev. Samuel Clark House

Reverend Samuel Clark (1729-1778), a Princeton graduate, was ordained in the Kensington Congregational Church in Berlin 1756 and then served as its minister until his death twenty-two years later. He built the grand house at 67 Burnham Street, one of the earliest brick residences in Connecticut, in 1759, but did not marry until 1766, when he wed Jerusha White. The latter part of his pastorate was contentious and the congregation split into separate societies in 1772. In 1773, Rev. Clark entered into a financially unsuccessful partnership, ending in a quarrel, with merchant Jonathan Hart. At the time of his death the Revolutionary War was underway and Rev. Clark was facing dismissal from his pastorate for suspected Tory sympathies. His house was next occupied by Rev. Benoni Upson, who succeeded him as minister. The Upson family lived in the house into the twentieth century. The house has a white-painted twentieth-century addition to the left of its front facade.