Hollister-Day Cottage (1872)

March 18th, 2017 Posted in Folk Victorian, Houses, Old Saybrook | No Comments »

One of the many lost homes of Hartford is the Barnabas Deane House, which once stood on Grove Street. Barnabas was the brother of Silas Deane of Wethersfield and he is said to built the house on instructions from his famous brother who ended up never returning from Europe to live in it. The house was later home to Nelson Hollister and then was occupied by The Open Hearth. While the Deane House was torn down in the 1920s to make room for a parking lot for the Hartford Club, another home owned by Mr. Hollister, who was a prominent businessman and the first treasurer of the Connecticut Valley Railroad, survives in the Borough of Fenwick in Old Saybrook. Located at 22 Fenwick Avenue, it was built by Hollister in 1872, making it one of the oldest cottages to be constructed in the Fenwick summer colony. In 1888, Hollister’s daughter sold the house to George H. Day of Hartford. Day made many additions to the house, but not always with a concern for aesthetic matters: he once built a second floor lavatory with exposed plumbing running down the house’s exterior! After c. 1917, the cottage served as an annex to the neighboring Riversea Inn. In 1949 it became a private residence again when it was sold to Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Jones, who were the first to make the cottage habitable year-round.

Gales Ferry School House (1868)

March 17th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Ledyard, Schools | No Comments »

The community of Gales Ferry in Ledyard was served for generations by a one-room schoolhouse. The surviving school building, erected in 1868, is the third to have stood on the same site (4 Hurlbutt Road) since 1750. It was used as a school until a new two-room building (now the Gales Ferry Community Center) was opened in January 1929. The former Gales Ferry School House was later restored by the Ledyard Historical Society.

Kensington Congregational Church Parsonage (1870)

March 16th, 2017 Posted in Berlin, Houses, Italianate | No Comments »

The house at 14 Robbins Road in the Kensington section of the town of Berlin was perhaps built c. 1860 (it is so listed in Berlin property records). The lot (with no dwelling mentioned) was sold to the Kensington Ecclesiastical Society by Edward Cowles in 1870 and it has since served as the parsonage of the Kensington Congregational Church. A volume released to celebrate the two hundredth anniversary of the church in 1912 indicates that, instead of a preexisting house,

The present parsonage was built in 1869-70. A debt of $4100, incurred in part on account of the parsonage, was raised by subscription in 1871.

The parsonage is already noted on the map of Berlin in the 1869 Hartford County Atlas by Baker & Tilden.

Kenyon Mill (1863)

March 15th, 2017 Posted in Coventry, Industrial, Italianate | No Comments »

The town of Coventry was once home to a number of water-powered mills. One in South Coventry, known as the Kenyon Mill, was built next to a mill pond in 1863, replacing an earlier mill (built in 1836) that had suffered a major fire. The mill was acquired by C. H. Kenyon from S. R. Moredock, manufacturer of satinet, in 1864. Kenyon had begun making woolen pants (Kentucky jeans) in Coventry in the 1840s and by 1870 his mill had developed into a major enterprise with over seventy employees. He later made ladies dress flannels. After Kenyon, a series of textile manufacturers occupied the mill, ending with National Silk, manufacturers of Tioga yarn, which occupied the building from 1934 until 1972. In more recent years the town was seeking proposals for the adaptive reuse of the mill. In 2007 it was acquired by the Corporation for Independent Living, which has converted it into condominium units known as Kenyon Falls.

117-119 Center Street, Manchester (1897)

March 14th, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Houses, Manchester | No Comments »

The late Victorian/Colonial Revival two-family house at 117-119 Center Street in Manchester is a typical example of the many such houses erected in town at the turn-of-the-century. It was built c. 1897.

Charles M. Gilman House (1873)

March 13th, 2017 Posted in Fairfield, Folk Victorian, Houses, Stick Style | No Comments »

Charles M. Gilman was a lawyer and an incorporator of the Southport Trust Company. His large house, located at 139 Main Street in Southport, was designed J. C. Cady. Gilman hired another New York architect, William H. Beers, to design the house’s library addition. Erected in 1900, the addition well matches the architectural style of the earlier section, which combines elements of the Italianate, Gothic and Stick styles of architecture. Original plans for both the house and addition are housed at the Fairfield Museum and History Center Library.

Living Proof Church (1848)

March 12th, 2017 Posted in Ashford, Churches, Greek Revival | No Comments »

A Baptist church was established in Ashford in the village of Westford in 1780. In 1848 a new church was built in Warrenville section of town, as Richard M. Bayles describes in his History of Windham County, Connecticut (1889):

John Warren, Esq., manifested much anxiety to have a Baptist church organized in the western part of Ashford, in a village on the turnpike from Hartford to Boston and Providence. The First, or as it was often called, the Knowlton meeting house, was not considered so central, nor easy of access as many thought desirable. But the people in the vicinity of the old church were greatly opposed to giving up worship in their sanctuary, and continued for a time to worship there after another congregation was formed in “Pompey Hollow,” as the place was then called. Mr. Warren offered a fund to support worship in the Hollow, and the name of the village was changed to Warrenville. A church was organized January 22d, 1848[.]

The meeting house was completed that same year (1848). Later called the United Baptist Church, it is now known as Living Proof Church.