Little Zion Church of Christ (1889)

April 12th, 2015 Posted in Churches, Norwalk, Romanesque Revival | No Comments »

Little Zion Church

The Second Congregational Church of Norwalk, later called the South Norwalk Congregational Church, was formed in 1836 by members of the First Congregational Church who wanted to build a new church in the village of Old Well, which later became the City of South Norwalk. Its first church building was completed that same year and was enlarged in 1856. Ground was broken for a new and larger church on May 31, 1888. The structure (the current address is 4 Dr Martin Luther King, Jr Drive) was completed and the first services were held on the last Sunday in December 1889. The formal dedication took place early in January 1890. By the early 1970s the church had a dwindling membership. It sold its building and merged with United Congregational Church in West Norwalk. The former South Norwalk Congregational Church is now Little Zion Church of Christ of the Apostolic Faith. The steeple was hit by lightning in September 2014 which started a fire that caused some damage to the roof.

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Lewis Block (1854)

April 11th, 2015 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Italianate, Meriden | No Comments »

29 West Main 1854

Though it has a front facade dating to c. 1870 and it was later much altered on the first floor, the building at 29 West Main Street in Meriden is thought to have been built in 1854. Known as the Lewis Block, should not be confused with the larger Hall and Lewis Block at the corner of Colony and West Main Streets.

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Goodrich-Stratton House (1740)

April 10th, 2015 Posted in Colonial, Glastonbury, Houses | No Comments »

Goodrich-Stratton House

The center-chimney colonial house at 501 Main Street in South Glastonbury was built around 1740 by Timothy Brooks on land he had acquired in 1730 from William Goodrich, Sr. In 1749 Brooks sold the house to William Goodrich, Jr., a sea captain, who drowned in 1753. His daughter Mehitabel, wife of John Welles, Jr. (who owned the Welles-Shipman-Ward House in Glastonbury), later sold the property to her step-brother, Samuel Stratton, Jr.

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Mrs. Benjamin Pomeroy House (1869)

April 9th, 2015 Posted in Fairfield, Houses, Second Empire | No Comments »

Benjamin Pomeroy House, 658 Pequot Road

Mrs. Benjamin Pomeroy, the wife of a shipping merchant, had the house at 658 Pequot Avenue in Southport erected for herself and her daughters. The Second Empire-style house, which features an elaborate front porch and mansard roof, was designed by the architectural firm of Lambert & Bunnell. Constructed in 1868-1869, the house’s builder was Gamaliel Bradford of Fairfield. The house remained in the family until 1946. The house’s carriage house was erected around the same time as the main house.

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Daniel Darte Homestead (1722)

April 8th, 2015 Posted in Bolton, Colonial, Houses | No Comments »

Daniel Darte Homestead

The house at 22 Hebron Road in Bolton was built sometime between 1740 and 1770, although it may date to as early as 1722. It has been added to over the years. It was built by Daniel Darte (1691-1771), an original settler of Bolton. Daniel Darte supported the town’s separation from Hartford in 1720. There is another house in Bolton, at 219 Bolton Center Road, that is traditionally associated with Daniel Darte.

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Watertown Town Hall (1894)

April 7th, 2015 Posted in Colonial Revival, Public Buildings, Romanesque Revival, Watertown | No Comments »

Watertown Town Hall

The Town Hall of Watertown stands on the site where the town’s meeting house of 1772 had once stood. Town offices had previously been located in the Amos Gridley Store before the Town Hall was erected in 1894. The date is on the front of the building in Roman numerals: MDCCCXCIV. The Town Hall is an interesting combination of the Richardsonian Romanesque (similar to the former Watertown Library building across the street) and Colonial Revival styles. Read the rest of this entry »

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Worthington Ecclesiastical Society Parsonage (1845)

April 6th, 2015 Posted in Berlin, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

Worthington Ecclesiastical Society Parsonage

On Worthington Ridge in Berlin are two similar houses, built around 1845. Both houses are described by Catharine Melinda North in her History of Berlin (1916):

The two houses standing next south of the new academy were built by Elishama Brandegee, the father of Dr. Elishama Brandegee. The one nearest the academy, long the home of Dr. Brandegee and his family, was designed for the teacher and was occupied by Ariel Parish. The other, now the parsonage of the Second Congregational Church, strange to relate, was built to be used as a parsonage by the Rev. James McDonald, who was settled here 1835-1837.

The Second Congregational Church, now the Berlin Congregational Church, began as the Worthington Ecclesiastical Society. The former parsonage is at 850 Worthington Ridge.

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