Dr. Simeon Field House (1763)

February 24th, 2015 Posted in Colonial, Enfield, Houses

Dr Simeon Field

According to the sign on the house at 1346 Enfield Street in Enfield, it was “Built by Dr. Simeon Field, 1763.” Born in Longmeadow, Mass. in 1731, Dr. Field built the house in the same year he married Margaret Reynolds. According to Vol. I of the Field Genealogy (1901), by Frederick Clifton Pierce (a work dedicated to the famous Marshall Field of Chicago), Dr. Simeon Field

graduated at Yale College as a physician. He settled in Enfield, Conn., where he was very celebrated, and had an extensive practice. He also kept a tavern which is now, 1900, still standing, and is known as the old Field tavern. He also was an active and influential man during the Revolution, and during his time was easily the most important man in his town.

His son also became a doctor, as described in the fourth volume of Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College with Annals of the College History, July 1778-June 1792 (1907), by Franklin Bowditch Dexter:

Simeon Field, the eldest child of Dr. Simeon Field, of Enfield, Connecticut, and nephew of Dr. Samuel Field (Yale 1745), was born in Enfield on June 3, 1765. His mother was Margaret, daughter of the Rev. Peter Raynolds (Harvard 1720), of Enfield, and sister of Dr. Samuel Raynolds (Yale 1750). He joined College in May of the Freshman year.

He studied medicine with his father, and settled at first in Somers, the town next east of Enfield; but about 1790, on the decline of his father’s health, he returned to Enfield, where he became locally distinguished for his valuable professional services. Though not a member of the church, he was always a stable friend and supporter of the institutions of religion.

After a feebleness of several months he died in Enfield on March 1, 1822, in his 57th year. He left no descendants, and his property, inventoried at $6833, was divided between his brothers and sisters. The honorary degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred on him by Yale College in 1817.

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