Archive for the ‘New Haven’ Category

New Haven Water Company (1903)

Wednesday, November 25th, 2015 Posted in Commercial Buildings, New Haven, Romanesque Revival | No Comments »

New Haven Water Company

The New Haven Water Company was incorporated in 1849 as a private water utility. In 1903, the company erected an office building at 100 Crown Street in New Haven. The brick and brownstone structure was designed by architect Leoni Robinson in the Romanesque Revival style. The interior of the building was renovated by wife-and-husband owners Alex and Alexander Heonis, who opened Capture Salon in 2012.

Share Button

837-849 Chapel Street, New Haven (1878; 1882; 1912)

Tuesday, November 10th, 2015 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Italianate, Libraries, New Haven, Queen Anne, Renaissance Revival | 1 Comment »

Chapel Street

Part of a row of historic buildings on Chapel Street in New Haven are two structures with Queen Anne and Eastlake design elements. Located at nos. 841-843 and 845-847, both were built in 1878. They are currently owned by the Young Men’s Institute and the second and third floors at 847 Chapel Street (above no. 845) are the current home of the Institute Library, founded in 1826. Just west is the Optical Building, at 849 Chapel Street, built in 1912 and designed by Leoni Robinson. To the east is the English Building at 837-839 Chapel Street, named for Henry F. English. It was built in 1882, but after a fire a new Renaissance Revival facade by Leoni Robinson was installed in 1898.

Share Button

United Illuminating Company Building (1909)

Monday, November 9th, 2015 Posted in Commercial Buildings, New Haven, Renaissance Revival | No Comments »

United Illuminating Co

Resembling a Venetian Palazzo, the building at 124 Temple Street in New Haven was built in 1909 as the offices of the United Illuminating Company. The company formed in 1899 when the New Haven Electric Company acquired the Bridgeport Electric Light Company. The company is now based in Orange. A third floor and rear wing were added to the building in 1916. Both the building and the addition were designed by R. W. Foote of Foote & Townsend.

Share Button

Berzelius (1910)

Monday, June 30th, 2014 Posted in Collegiate, Neoclassical, New Haven, Organizations | No Comments »


Located across from the triangle in New Haven formed where Temple Street diverges from Whitney Avenue is the home of Berzelius, a senior society at Yale University. Founded in 1848, it is a secret society named for the Swedish scientist Jöns Jakob Berzelius. It was originally founded as part of the Sheffield Scientific School, which was later integrated into Yale University. The building, built in 1910, is located at 78 Trumbull Street. It was designed by architect Donn Barber.

Share Button

William Converse House (1889)

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014 Posted in Houses, New Haven, Queen Anne | No Comments »

436 Orange St., New Haven

Built in 1889, the elaborate Queen Anne house at 436 Orange Street in New Haven was built for William Converse, the third president of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. Converse married Mary Augusta Pardee in 1855.

Share Button

Frederick Ives House (1866)

Saturday, April 26th, 2014 Posted in Houses, Italianate, New Haven | No Comments »

478 Orange Street, New Haven

Frederick Ives (1832-1883) was an axle manufacturer in Hamden. Continuing the business started by his father, Henry Ives, he formed Frederick Ives & Co. with Willis E. Miller and George E. Ives during the Civil War. When George E. Ives left to partner with L.F. Goodyear, the company continued as Ives & Miller, later called the Mount Carmel Axle Works. Frederick Ives’ house at 478 Orange Street in New Haven was built in 1866. It has Indian-style columns of a kind favored by architect Henry Austen.

Share Button

William H. Taft Mansion (1870)

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014 Posted in Houses, New Haven, Second Empire | No Comments »

Taft Mansion

The Mansard-roofed house at 111 Whitney Avenue in New Haven (pdf) was built in 1870. It is known as the William H. Taft Mansion because the former President (1909-1913) (soon to be Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court) owned the house around the time of the First World War, although he never actually lived in it. He sold the house in 1921. Extensively remodeled in 2008, the house was recently used as the offices of Research Edge, an independent research firm, which later became Hedgeye Risk Management. More recently, the house has become home to the William F. Buckley Jr. Program, a Yale conservative group founded in 2010.

Share Button