Archive for the ‘Hartford’ Category

Atlantic Screw Works (1902)

Saturday, July 8th, 2017 Posted in Hartford, Industrial, Renaissance Revival | No Comments »

At the corner of Charter Oak Avenue and Wyllys Street in Hartford is a former factory complex erected by the Atlantic Screw Works, which built machines to manufacture screws. The company was established in 1877 in New York State, but moved to Hartford in 1879. It was originally based in rented space in the Colt Armory. By 1902 the company was ready to erect its own building. The earliest section of their new factory (on the right in the image above) was built in 1902-1903. The longer section (on the left in the image above), designed by Davis & Brooks, was built c. 1910 and more than doubled the company’s operating capabilities. The company lasted into the 1970s and the building was converted to office space in the 1980s.

Our Lady of Fatima Church, Hartford (1988)

Sunday, March 19th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Hartford, Modern | No Comments »

Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Parish was established in Hartford in 1958 to serve the local community of immigrants from Portugal and the Azores. The founding pastor, Father José Dias Martins da Silva, purchased a vacant Danish Lutheran Church on Russ Street where the parish worshiped until the basement chapel of a new church was completed in 1986. Our Lady of Fatima Church, located at 50 Kane Street in Hartford, was dedicated on April 30, 1988. The parish also later erected a community center.

Grace Seventh Day Adventist Church (1915)

Sunday, February 26th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Colonial Revival, Hartford, Houses, Mission/Spanish Colonial | No Comments »

The building at 870 Prospect Avenue in Hartford was built in 1915 as a single-family home to designs by architect Charles O. Whitmore. For many years the house was home to Grace Hall Wilson, widow of John C. Wilson, president of Colt Firearms. Today it is Grace Seventh Day Adventist Church.

George J. Capewell House (1870)

Friday, February 24th, 2017 Posted in Apartment Buildings, Hartford, Houses, Italianate | No Comments »

George J. Capewell (1843-1919) invented an automatic process to make horse nails. In 1881 he started the Capewell Horse Nail Company in Hartford. His residence in the city was an Italianate-style house at 903 Asylum Avenue, built in 1870. The house, long owned by the Holcombe family, was later converted to apartments.

Dr. John B. Griggs House (1918)

Monday, November 14th, 2016 Posted in Colonial Revival, Hartford, Houses | No Comments »

1380 Asylum Ave., Hartford

Dr. John Bagg Griggs was a general practitioner in Farmington, from 1897 to 1899 living with his wife, Mary Ellen Bolter, at 41 Main Street, where their son, Dr. John Bolter Griggs, was born. After next living at 101 Main Street, they moved to Stamford in 1903. After his first wife died in 1905, Dr. Griggs married again and moved with his wife, Valina D. Griggs, to Hartford in 1907. Dr. Griggs practiced as an internist until 1917 and was involved in the first X-ray laboratory in the city, established at Hartford Hospital in 1910 under the leadership of Dr. Arthur Heublein. Completed in 1918, the Griggs residence at 1380 Asylum Avenue in Hartford was designed by architect Edward Thomas Hapgood.

By 1996 the house had been owned by the State of Connecticut for nearly fifty years. Once used as offices but then left vacant and considered to be “surplus property,” the house was bought at auction by Peter and Diane Valin, who lovingly restored the much deteriorated house to once again become a grand West End residence.

William C. Scheide House (1913)

Thursday, September 15th, 2016 Posted in Hartford, Houses, Tudor Revival | No Comments »

1414 Asylum Ave

Built c. 1913, the house at 1414 Asylum Avenue in Hartford was the home of insurance executive William C. Scheide. His son, Lester Beach Scheide (1897-1953), became an architect. The house was designed by architect Edward Thomas Hapgood.

Grace Episcopal Church, Hartford (1868)

Sunday, September 11th, 2016 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Hartford | No Comments »

Grace Episcopal Church

Grace Episcopal Church in Hartford was first established in 1863 as a mission chapel of Trinity Church on Sigourney Street and became an independent parish in 1912. Part of the original church, consecrated on November 11, 1868, survives as the central section of the current church building. That building’s entrance and belfry faced New Park Avenue. A ten-foot addition was added to the front of the original 50’x 22′ chapel in 1908-1909. The building, located at 55 New Park Avenue, was further enlarged in 1966-1967, when the nave was lengthened to include the present choir loft and the sanctuary was also expanded. The entrance was moved to the south side, which also included a new bell tower, and the Chapel of Our Lady of Walsingham was added on the north side. The chapel was rededicated in 2006 with the installation of a new icon, to St. Martin, Grace Church’s patron saint. The church has a connected parish house designed by George Keller. Read the rest of this entry »