Archive for the ‘Gothic’ Category

Kensington United Methodist Church (1893)

Sunday, August 28th, 2016 Posted in Berlin, Churches, Gothic | No Comments »

Kensington United Methodist Church

The Kensington United Methodist Church at the corner of Church and Hotchkiss Streets in Berlin was built in 1893 and a modern education wing added in 1961. The church was first organized in 1858 as the Kensington Methodist Episcopal Church and met in the Berlin Town Hall until their first church was built in 1865 at the corner of Percival Avenue and Sbona Road.

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Erastus Gay House (1872)

Saturday, August 27th, 2016 Posted in Farmington, Gothic, Houses | No Comments »

44 Main

The house at 44 Main Street in Farmington is often dated to 1872 in the belief that a previous house on the property had burned down the preceding year, but it may be that this is that earlier house, built for Edward Whitman (1792-1862) c. 1851. Erastus Gay (1843-1912), a store-owner, acquired the property in 1871. Gay had married Grace F. Cowles, daughter of Francis Cowles, in 1867. Elizabeth V. Keep purchased it in 1916 and soon after willed the house to Miss Porter’s School. Once used as a dorm, it is now the school’s Colgate Health Center.

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St. Michael Church, Beacon Falls (1942)

Sunday, August 21st, 2016 Posted in Beacon Falls, Churches, Gothic | No Comments »

St Michael Church

St. Michael Catholic Church in Beacon Falls began in 1885 as a mission of St. Augustine Church in Seymour and became a parish in 1924. The first St. Michael’s Church in Beacon Falls, erected at the corner of Church and Main Streets, was dedicated on March 11, 1900. The property was sold to the state of Connecticut for highway construction and the cornerstone of the current church was blessed on October 12, 1941. The church’s first Mass was celebrated on on June 26, 1942. The interior remained unfinished for many years due to wartime austerity, but the completed church was eventually dedicated on June 24, 1956.

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St. Casimir Church, Terryville (1907)

Sunday, August 14th, 2016 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Plymouth | No Comments »

St Casimir Church

Polish immigrants settled in Terryville in significant numbers in the 1890s. At first they worshiped at Immaculate Conception Church, but in December 1900 the St. Casimir Society, a Polish fraternal organization, was formed and soon purchased land for a Polish Catholic church on Allen Street in Terryville. St. Casimir Church, 17 Allen Street, was dedicated on September 1, 1907. Since 1999 the two parishes of Immaculate Conception and Saint Casimir have been linked.

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St. Paul Catholic Church, Kensington (1914)

Sunday, July 24th, 2016 Posted in Berlin, Churches, Gothic, Mission/Spanish Colonial, Romanesque Revival | No Comments »

St Paul Church

To serve the Irish community in Kensington (in Berlin), Father Luke Daly of New Britain acquired land on Main Street for a church in 1873. Construction began in October of 1878 and the unfinished church was dedicated in May 1879. St. Paul’s became a full parish two years later. A suspicious fire destroyed St. Paul Church on March 5, 1913. Construction soon began on the current church, at Alling and Peck Streets. The cornerstone was blessed on November 2, 1913 and the church was dedicated on May 24, 1914. According to the Hartford Courant (“Bishop Dedicates Kensington Church,” March 25, 1814):

The edifice itself was built of red brick with Kentucky limestone cornices. The roof is Spanish tile. The architecture is English Gothic with a hint of Spanish mission in the tower. There are three porticos.

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Gardner Mansion (1843)

Saturday, July 16th, 2016 Posted in East Windsor, Gothic, Houses, Italianate | No Comments »

36 Gardner Street

The Gothic Revival mansion with Italianate detailing at 36 Gardner Street at Warehouse Point in East Windsor was built in 1843 (or 1847) for Avah Gardner. The Gardener estate later became a Swedish orphanage and working farm. The property was acquired by the state in 1883 when the Connecticut General Assembly decided to create an orphanage/country home in each of its eight counties. The orphanage served children who had run away from home or were truant. Known as Gardner Hall or the Administration Building, the former mansion has two additions: a north wing built c. 1890 and a section on the east side added in 1921. The building originally had a tower which has since been removed. The state’s other county orphanages closed in 1955 except for the facility at Warehouse Point, which was renamed the State Receiving Home. It was later renamed the Connecticut Children’s Place, serving as a residential and educational center for abused and neglected children. Since 2013 has been the Albert J. Solnit Children’s Center- North Campus, a psychiatric treatment facility for juvenile males.

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St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Oxford (1835)

Sunday, July 10th, 2016 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Oxford | No Comments »

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St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Oxford was founded in 1764. The parish’s first church was erected in 1767 on land on Governor’s Hill Road purchased from Joseph Davis. The church was not consecrated until 1816. In 1834 the parish decided to erect a new church, which was presumably completed the following year. The church was enlarged and redecorated in 1878. A new parish hall, connected to the church, was built in 1963. Read the rest of this entry »

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