Archive for the ‘Gothic’ Category

Trumbull Congregational Church (1899)

Sunday, September 17th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Trumbull | No Comments »

The Congregational Church in Trumbull was first established in 1730. Services were initially held at Pulpit Rock on White Plains Road. The first meeting house was built on the corner of White Plains Road and Unity Road. The congregation’s second meeting house was built in 1747 on what is now Church Hill Road, just west of where the Helen Plumb Building would be built in 1883. Over the years, the expanding road moved closer to the church and many a horse and wagon, coming down the hill on icy days, collided with the corner of the building. In 1842 a new church was erected on the same site, but located further back toward the Pequonnock River. A fire destroyed this building in 1898. The cornerstone for the current church, built at a new location at 3115 Reservoir Avenue, was laid on September 28, 1898 and the building was dedicated on on May 11, 1899. The church was constructed of stone quarried north of Beardsley Park.

2 Moss Street, Pawcatuck (1870)

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017 Posted in Gothic, Houses, Stonington | No Comments »

At 2 Moss Street in the Pawcatuck section of Stonington is a nice example of a house built in the style called “Carpenter Gothic.” The house, built circa 1870, displays the decorative bargeboards in the gables that are typical of the Gothic Revival. Moss Street contains a number of similar Carpenter Gothic cottages.

St. Patrick’s Church, Mystic (1909)

Sunday, September 10th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Mystic, Stonington | No Comments »

The cornerstone of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, 35 East Main Street in Mystic, was laid on August 16, 1908 and the building was dedicated the following year. The parish had previously used a building on Church Street, purchased from the local Methodist church in 1870. The church on East Main has been altered in the years since it was first erected. The original Gothic entryway and tower have been replaced with less architecturally elaborate versions. A one-story parish hall was also added to the building. Read the rest of this entry »

Main Street Baptist Church, Meriden (1868)

Sunday, September 3rd, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Meriden | No Comments »

The church at 22 Crown Street in Meriden was built in 1868 as the West Meriden Baptist Church, later renamed the Main Street Baptist Church. Established in 1860, the church had an earlier chapel on the same site. The present church building’s tower was removed in 1946 and in the 1950s the Connecticut Bank & Trust Company built a branch right in front of the building. In 1997 the Baptist Church closed and sold the building to Faith Center Church of God in Christ.

Noank Methodist Church (1902)

Sunday, August 20th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Folk Victorian, Gothic, Groton, Shingle Style | No Comments »

The building at 55 Sylvan Street in Noank, formerly used as a church, was built in 1902-1903. It combines elements of the Gothic and Shingle styles with distinctive Art Nouveau windows. As related in Historic Groton (1909):

The Methodist church was formed as a chapel, partially dependent on the conference for support, in the year 1878. After years of using what was known as the chapel, it became advisable to build a better and larger house, which was done in 1903. They have now an auditorium with a seating capacity of two hundred and fifty to three hundred, fitted with modern improvements. A well equipped kitchen and Sunday school rooms are below the main auditorium.

The Noank Methodist Church later merged with the Groton Methodist Church to form Christ United Methodist Church, which moved to a new building at 200 Hazelnut Hill Road in 1972. The former Noank Church was converted into a residence.

All Saints Episcopal Church, Meriden (1893)

Sunday, July 30th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Meriden | No Comments »

As related in An Historic Record and Pictorial Description of the Town of Meriden, Connecticut AKA A Century of Meriden (1906):

A[l]though the present attractive edifice of All Saints’ Protestant Episcopal Church, was not occupied for services until Ash Wednesday, 1893, some eight years or more previous it became evident that the erection of a church was definitely contemplated for that section of Meriden. The first service was held in the dwelling house, 273 West Main street on December 13, 1885[.]

A women’s sewing circle began raising money to build a church. Their funds were augmented by a bequest of $10,000 by Mrs. Phoebe A. Hallam, in honor of her late husband, the Rev. R. A. Hallam, D. D., at one time rector of St. Andrews Church in Meriden. All Saints Memorial Church was built at 215 West Main Street and consecrated on November 17, 1893. In more recent years, as the parish faced declining attendance, they began meeting at Immanuel Lutheran Church on Hanover Street. The old church building on West Main Street was sold in 2009 and bought by Rock of Salvation Church (Roca De Salvacion).

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, Meriden (1936)

Sunday, July 9th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Meriden | No Comments »

In the 1870s, Italian immigrants began settling in the northwest corner of Meriden. For many years they attended existing Catholic churches in the city, but soon wanted to found their own parish. The Diocese of Hartford established Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Parish in 1894. The first parish church was a wooden building on Goodwill Avenue. The current church, located at 109 Goodwill Avenue, was dedicated on February 16, 1936. Our Lady of Mt. Carmel School was established in 1944 after the parish purchased the Nathan Hale Public School from the city of Meriden. In recent years, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel and St. Laurent Parishes in Meriden shared a priest. Earlier this year, as part of a reorganization throughout the Archdiocese of Hartford, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, St. Laurent and three other parishes merged to form the new Our Lady Queen of Angels Parish, based at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church.