Archive for the ‘Architectural Style’ Category

Dexter-Wallace House (1834)

Monday, May 30th, 2016 Posted in Houses, Mansfield, Vernacular | No Comments »

Dexter-Wallace House

According to Mansfield Four Corners (2003), by Rudy J. Favretti, the house at 1637 Storrs Road in Mansfield was built sometime between 1818 and 1834 by Darius Dexter. It had many owners over the years and was acquired in 1931 by Raymond H. Wallace (1899-1965), professor of plant physiology at UCONN. He and his wife made alterations to the house which included the addition of a sun room.

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St. John’s Episcopal Church, West Hartford (1909)

Sunday, May 29th, 2016 Posted in Churches, Gothic, West Hartford | No Comments »

St. John's Episcopal Church

St. John’s Episcopal Church, located at 679 Farmington Avenue in West Hartford, was preceded by the parish’s original church, located on Main Street in downtown Hartford. Designed by noted New Haven architect Henry Austin during the period he had an office in Hartford, the first St. John’s Church was consecrated on April 30, 1842. The main body of the church and the lower section of its tower were constructed of Portland brownstone. The upper tower and spire were made of wood and had to be removed in 1875 due to structural decay. In 1905, the parish decided to sell its land on Main Street to the trustees of the Wadsworth Atheneum. The church was taken down in 1907 and the Atheneum’s Morgan Memorial Building was erected in its place. (You can read more about the original St. John’s Church on Main Street in my book Vanished Downtown Hartford, pp. 128-131).

Downtown Hartford had been developing rapidly as a business and commercial center at the time and many churches there were relocating to more residential areas to the west. The new St. John’s Church was built in 1907-1909 on Farmington Avenue, just across the Hartford line in West Hartford. The new church, designed by noted architect Bertram G. Goodhue, was consecrated on June 9, 1909. Due to budgetary limitations, Goodhue’s plans for an adjoining parish house were not completed until 1914-1915. The cornerstone for a new and larger parish house was laid in 1927 and at the same time the church built a cloister and outdoor pulpit. In 1928 the nave was lengthened to the north, toward Farmington Avenue, and a new entrance was built on that side (the previous entrance had faced west towards Highland Avenue). The church was extensively restored and altered inside after a fire in 1992.

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Masonic Temple, Monroe (1904)

Saturday, May 28th, 2016 Posted in Colonial Revival, Monroe, Organizations | No Comments »

Masonic Temple, Monroe

Washington Lodge No. 19, the first Masonic Lodge in the country named for George Washington, formed in 1791 in Monroe. By 1800 the Lodge completed what was the first Temple in Connecticut erected solely for Masonic use. This building was later moved to Hurd Street and became the Town of Monroe’s first Town Hall. A new Masonic Temple was erected in 1904 at 1 Fan Hill Road. It is a Georgian Revival structure modeled on the central section of the White House in Washington, D.C.

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Judge Elisha Stearns House (1800)

Friday, May 27th, 2016 Posted in Colonial, Colonial Revival, Houses, Tolland | No Comments »

26 Tolland Green

The house at 26 Tolland Green in Tolland was probably built sometime in the eighteenth century and was certainly standing by c. 1800. Recent research suggests it may be much older than the traditionally ascribed date of 1800. As explained in a post by the Tolland Historical Society, the land where the house stands was part of a 10-acre parcel acquired by Josiah Goodrich, Sr. in 1725. He had a trading shop on the property, which may have been located in the north wing of the present house. In 1750 Josiah Goodrich, Jr. sold the property to John Huntington, Jr.

The house is traditionally named for Judge Elisha Stearns, who was the first president of the Tolland County Bank, incorporated in 1828. The bank operated briefly inside the house until a bank building was erected in 1829. Frank T. Newcomb, Treasurer of the Savings Bank of Tolland and Tolland County Treasurer, served as postmaster and had a post office in the ell of the house from 1888 to 1893. In the nineteenth century the house was extensively remodeled in the Victorian style. It was later altered again in the Colonial Revival style.

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165 Oakland Street, Manchester (1760)

Thursday, May 26th, 2016 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Manchester | No Comments »

165 Oakland st., Manchester

The house at 165 Oakland Street in Manchester is an excellent example of an early Cape Cod-style home. It was built c. 1760-1770.

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Old Town Hall, Willington (1876)

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016 Posted in Public Buildings, Vernacular, Willington | No Comments »

Old Willington Town Hall

Although it resembles a typical one-room school house, the building next to the Old Congregational Church on Willington Common was actually built as the Town of Willington’s first Town Hall. It and the church were erected the same year, 1876, symbolizing the role of town and Ecclesiastical Society for the community as represented by their two meeting spaces. The builder of the Town Hall was Lorenzo Ide. Eventually, in 1920s, the church itself came to be used as Willington’s second Town Hall.

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Lucius Chapman House (1834)

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016 Posted in Ellington, Houses, Vernacular | No Comments »

Lucius Chapman House

The Lucius Chapman House, at 87 Maple Street in Ellington, was built in 1834. It has a later Italianate entrance porch. As related in “Ellington, ” by Alice E. Pinney (The Connecticut Magazine, Vol. IV, No. 2, 1898):

About the beginning of the present century the business of the town changed its location again to a point on the old turnpike a mile east of the present center, near the junction with the road leading to Stafford, where a thriving store was kept in an old red gambrel-roofed house by Dr. James Steele of Tolland. Although he bore the professional title of doctor, he is recorded as being a merchant and a farmer. He died in 1819. Lucius Chapman is said to have kept the store from 1825 until 1856. when he sold out and went West and the place was abandoned for store purposes.

As noted by Henry Willey in Isaac Willey of New London, Conn., and His Descendants (1888), Rebecca Willey, daughter of Asa and Rebecca Wass Willey, was born in 1798 and in 1830 married

Lucius Chapman, a merchant of Ellington, Conn. They removed to Illinois, and were living there in 1861.

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