Archive for the ‘Architectural Style’ Category

D. W. Huntington House (1830)

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017 Posted in Coventry, Federal Style, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 234 Armstrong Road in Coventry, dramatically situated on a hillside, was built c. 1830. Originally the Stanley family farmhouse, the house was later the home of D. W. Huntington, who owned a silk mill along the nearby Mill Brook in the 1860s-1880s. Originally from Montville, Huntington had moved to Coventry in his youth. He had been overseer of a cotton mill and studied civil engineering. In 1874, Huntington and William A. Hempstead patented an improvement in water-meters.

Case-Cowles House (1771)

Monday, June 26th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Farmington, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 144 Main Street in Farmington was built sometime between 1771 and 1797. In the former year, the land was acquired by John Case, who died in 1791. Originally from Simsbury, Case made hats with his son Coral, for whom he may have bought the land. The house was built by either Coral, who died in 1800, or his father. In 1810 it was acquired by Richard Cowles (1786-1845), a prominent citizen who served as town treasurer (1832-1839) and state representative (1834).

New Covenant United Methodist Church (1894)

Sunday, June 25th, 2017 Posted in Churches, East Hartford, Gothic | No Comments »

The following description of the Burnside Methodist Episcopal Society appears in East Hartford: Its History and Traditions (1879), by Joseph O. Goodwin:

The first meeting-house of the church society in Scotland [the original name for the area called Burnside in East Hartford] stood on the street just cast of the residence of the late William Hanmer. It was a plain brown house, built sometime before 1834, without cupola or steeple. It was moved back, and is now used on the Hanmer place for a horse barn. The site of the present meeting-house in Burnside was given to the society by Mr. George Goodwin. This church has now a fine organ, and a live and growing membership.

The church burned down on January 15, 1893. A new church was dedicated on March 14, 1894. The church, located at 16 Church Street, on the corner of Burnside Avenue, has been much expanded over the years, including an attached three-story brick education and fellowship building, completed in 1953. In 2006, the Burnside Methodist Church merged with the Hockanum Methodist Church to form New Covenant Methodist Church.

Burrows House (1825)

Saturday, June 24th, 2017 Posted in Federal Style, Houses, Mystic, Stonington | No Comments »

The Burrows House at Mystic Seaport, built between 1805 and 1825, was originally erected on Water Street, on the Groton side of the Mystic River. In the 1860s and 1870s, it was the home of Seth and Jane Burrows. By that time the house had been raised above a new story in which Seth Winthrop Burrows sold groceries. The house was dismantled in 1953 to make way for a bank and then reassembled at Mystic Seaport. Read the rest of this entry »

Horace W. Davis House (1850)

Friday, June 23rd, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Groton, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 40 Pearl Street in the Noank section of Groton was built circa 1850. It was the home home of Horace W. Davis, probably Horace Winthrop Davis (1823-1891) who married Harriet Ashby in 1845.

Allen Avery House (1874)

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017 Posted in Groton, Houses, Mystic, Second Empire | No Comments »

The house at 17 Pearl Street, on the Groton side of Mystic, is currently the home of Dinoto Funeral Home. A sign on the house indicates it was built circa 1874 and was the home of Allen Avery, undertaker. As related in the Genealogical and Biographical Record of New London County (1905), Allen Avery was born in 1838 and married Alice Babcock Hinckley in 1862. As the book continues:

Mr. Avery spent his boyhood days in Old Mystic, securing an excellent education in the public schools and at the academy at Mystic. Leaving school he worked as a ship joiner with his father in the Greenman yards, but in 1864, he embarked in an undertaking business at Mystic, in a store built by his father. Later, he purchased the store, and carried on an undertaking business for a number of years, but about 1884, he retired from that line, continuing, however, to operate his furniture store, which he had in the meanwhile established, until 1895. He is now engaged in the real estate business.

Apparently he lived in the house at 17 Pearl Street for no longer than twelve years, as the biography notes:

For the past seventeen years he has lived on the Stonington side of Mystic, in a house he built in 1886, so that he takes a deep interest in the affairs of the town of Stonington. For thirteen years he was a menber of the executive committee of the fire district. and was one of the organizers of the Hook and Ladder Company, which he served faithfully and ably as treasurer for twenty-one years. He is now vice-president of the Avery Memorial Association. which he served as president for two years. In fact there are few measures of a public character, designed to advance the interests of Mystic, in which he has not been concerned.

Colby-Tripp House (1864)

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017 Posted in Houses, Italianate, Mystic, Stonington | No Comments »

The house at 36 Denison Avenue in Mystic was built in 1864 for John N. Colby. He was a ship and sign carver and decorator who also held a number of patents, including one with John E. Coffin from 1875 for a combined cane and umbrella. From 1866 to 1892, the house was the residence of Capt. George E. Tripp. He had married Lydia Stanton Spicer in 1855.