Archive for the ‘Towns’ Category

Ebenezer Morgan House (1853)

Wednesday, August 23rd, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Mystic, Stonington | No Comments »

The house at 61 Denison Avenue (formerly 14 Denison Avenue) in Mystic was built in 1853 for Ebenezer Morgan. This may be the Ebenezer Morgan (1831-1903) whose career is described in the Genealogical and Biographical Record of New London County, Connecticut (1905):

In early life he worked in the old Irons & Grinnell yard as a ship carpenter, later in the Greenman and Mallory yards, in the latter serving as a superintendent, but during the last forty years of his life he was employed in the Light House Department on the Atlantic coast, and for several years was superintendent of construction in the Third Light House District. By his uniform courtesy and characteristic integrity Mr. Morgan commanded the respect of all who knew him. He was well known in Masonic circles throughout the State, being a member of Charity and Relief Lodge of Mystic: Palestine Commandery, of New London; and Pyramid Temple, Mystic Shrine, of Bridgeport. He had taken the thirty-second degree. He was a trustee in the Methodist Church. Like other members of his family, he was a man gifted in many ways, and he developed talents in ship construction which brought him many important contracts. He designed and built the famous yacht “Dauntless,” the property of Mrs. Colt, of Hartford, and was also the builder of the steam yacht “Britanique,” a vessel 240 feet in length, owned in Baltimore. He was the superintendent of the great work of dredging in the Potomac river and filling in land around the Washington Monument, and under his superintendence the Erie Basin Dry Dock was constructed.

Ray S. Wilbur House (1840)

Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Groton, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 29 Pearl Street in Noank was built in 1840 for Ray S. Wilbur.

Cornelius Fowler House (1880)

Monday, August 21st, 2017 Posted in Groton, Vernacular | No Comments »

The house at 11 Cove Street in Noank was built in 1880 and has a modern entrance porch. It was the home of Cornelius Fowler, who may be the same Cornelius Fowler who was a veteran of the Civil War, serving in the Twenty-First Regiment Infantry Regiment. Cornelius and his brother, Sylvester Crossman Fowler (1848-1919), were lobster fisherman.

Noank Methodist Church (1902)

Sunday, August 20th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Folk Victorian, Gothic, Groton, Shingle Style | No Comments »

The building at 55 Sylvan Street in Noank, formerly used as a church, was built in 1902-1903. It combines elements of the Gothic and Shingle styles with distinctive Art Nouveau windows. As related in Historic Groton (1909):

The Methodist church was formed as a chapel, partially dependent on the conference for support, in the year 1878. After years of using what was known as the chapel, it became advisable to build a better and larger house, which was done in 1903. They have now an auditorium with a seating capacity of two hundred and fifty to three hundred, fitted with modern improvements. A well equipped kitchen and Sunday school rooms are below the main auditorium.

The Noank Methodist Church later merged with the Groton Methodist Church to form Christ United Methodist Church, which moved to a new building at 200 Hazelnut Hill Road in 1972. The former Noank Church was converted into a residence.

Thomas Harris House (1755)

Saturday, August 19th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Greek Revival, Houses, Wethersfield | No Comments »

The house at 117 Maple Street in Wethersfield was built c. 1755. It was the homestead of Thomas Harris (1695-1774) and remained in the Harris family for many years. The area around the Harris Homestead, where members of the family built other houses, was known as Harris Hill. Harris had a son, Thomas Harris, Jr., who died in 1774 from injuries sustained at a barn raising. His son, Thomas Harris III (1771-1829) had a son, Chauncey Harris (1816-1875), who was principal of Hartford’s South School, which was later renamed for him. Chauncey Harris also served as the city’s Superintendent of Schools.

Isaac Eaton House (1840)

Friday, August 18th, 2017 Posted in Chaplin, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 19 Chaplin Street in Chaplin was built in 1840 by Isaac Eaton (1801-1846). He married Maria Butler in 1824 and they had three sons: Horace, Isaac Lester, and Albert Dwight. Born the year the house was built, Albert Dwight Eaton died in 1851 at the age of eleven. His tombstone once stood in the home’s garden, but was removed when a family monument was erected in the Chaplin Center Cemetery.

Mansfield Town Office Building (1935)

Thursday, August 17th, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Mansfield, Public Buildings | No Comments »

For many years, Mansfield’s Old Town Hall (built in 1843) was used to store town records and hold town meetings. Business was conducted at office holders’ homes. Eventually the need to have a central place for town offices led to the construction of the Town Office Building, a WPA project completed in 1935 (the date on the cornerstone), next to the Town Hall. An addition was constructed in 1957 and town offices were moved to another larger building in the late 1970s. In 1980, the Mansfield Historical Society moved into the old Office Building.