Archive for the ‘Enfield’ Category

Dr. Simeon Field House (1763)

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015 Posted in Colonial, Enfield, Houses | Comments Off

Dr Simeon Field

According to the sign on the house at 1346 Enfield Street in Enfield, it was “Built by Dr. Simeon Field, 1763.” Born in Longmeadow, Mass. in 1731, Dr. Field built the house in the same year he married Margaret Reynolds. According to Vol. I of the Field Genealogy (1901), by Frederick Clifton Pierce (a work dedicated to the famous Marshall Field of Chicago), Dr. Simeon Field

graduated at Yale College as a physician. He settled in Enfield, Conn., where he was very celebrated, and had an extensive practice. He also kept a tavern which is now, 1900, still standing, and is known as the old Field tavern. He also was an active and influential man during the Revolution, and during his time was easily the most important man in his town.

His son also became a doctor, as described in the fourth volume of Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College with Annals of the College History, July 1778-June 1792 (1907), by Franklin Bowditch Dexter:

Simeon Field, the eldest child of Dr. Simeon Field, of Enfield, Connecticut, and nephew of Dr. Samuel Field (Yale 1745), was born in Enfield on June 3, 1765. His mother was Margaret, daughter of the Rev. Peter Raynolds (Harvard 1720), of Enfield, and sister of Dr. Samuel Raynolds (Yale 1750). He joined College in May of the Freshman year.

He studied medicine with his father, and settled at first in Somers, the town next east of Enfield; but about 1790, on the decline of his father’s health, he returned to Enfield, where he became locally distinguished for his valuable professional services. Though not a member of the church, he was always a stable friend and supporter of the institutions of religion.

After a feebleness of several months he died in Enfield on March 1, 1822, in his 57th year. He left no descendants, and his property, inventoried at $6833, was divided between his brothers and sisters. The honorary degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred on him by Yale College in 1817.

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Cottage Green Cottages, Enfield (1848)

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015 Posted in Enfield, Gothic, Houses | Comments Off

50 Cottage Green, Enfield

On Cottage Green in Enfield is a row of four small Gothic Cottages (46, 50, 54, 58 Cottage Green). Possibly designed by Alexander Jackson Davis, they are the survivors of a group of cottages that were erected for factory workers around the now built-over Cottage Green, which was once a grassy square with a fountain or well in the center. This is a less commonly found arrangement for worker tenements designed to appeal to skilled workers imported from abroad. They were built c. 1848 to house employees of the Enfield Manufacturing Company, a hosiery factory founded in 1845 by H. G. Thompson that failed in 1873, after which its property was purchased by the Hartford Carpet Company. A brochure entitled “Historic Enfield,” alternately claims that the houses were built c. 1830 for Scottish weavers employed at the Bigelow carpet mill. Actually, according to the nomination for the Bigelow-Hartford Carpet Mills Historic District, they were built for English-born workers and the earlier cottages, built by Thompson’s father Orrin Thompson for imported Scottish weavers, do not survive today. This type of housing recalls the “Potsdam” Cottages (featured on this last week!) built in 1859 by Samuel Colt in Hartford for imported German workers at his willow ware factory. Pictured above is the house at 50 Cottage Green in Enfield, which is presently more in need of work than its neighbors.

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Sullivan Building (1915)

Saturday, January 17th, 2015 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Enfield, Neoclassical | Comments Off

Sullivan Building

The Sullivan Building, built in 1915 at 37 Pearl Street in the Thompsonville section of Enfield, is a commercial building designed with Neo-Classical Revival elements.

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Hazard Power Company Superintendent’s House (1865)

Friday, November 7th, 2014 Posted in Enfield, Houses, Italianate | Comments Off

8 School St., Hazardville

The Italianate villa-style house at 8 School Street, at the corner of Hazard Avenue in the Hazardville section of Enfield, was built in 1865 to serve as the home of the superintendent of the Hazard Powder Company. It is the largest house in the neighborhood.

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Carpet Mill Tenement (1840)

Friday, September 19th, 2014 Posted in Enfield, Greek Revival, Houses | Comments Off

40 Prospect St., Thompsonville

At 40 Prospect Street in Thompsonville in Enfield is a Greek Revival tenement building built c. 1840. It is one of many tenements in various styles in the neighborhood that were constructed for workers at the Hartford Carpet Company mills between the 1840s and 1920s. Read the rest of this entry »

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Holy Cross Polish National Catholic Church (1935)

Sunday, July 20th, 2014 Posted in Churches, Colonial Revival, Enfield | Comments Off

Holy Cross PNC Church

The Polish National Catholic Church was established in 1897 by Polish-Americans who were Roman Catholics but were unhappy with the Catholic Church hierarchy of the time. The PNC Church today seeks full communion with the Holy See, although it has important theological differences. Holy Cross Parish, part of the Eastern Diocese of the Polish National Catholic Church, was organized and built a church at 723 Enfield Street in Enfield in 1935.

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Powder Mill Barn (1845)

Monday, July 7th, 2014 Posted in Enfield, Outbuildings, Vernacular | Comments Off

Powder Hollow Barn

Powder Hollow, in the Hazardville section of Enfield, was once the site of the Hazard Powder Company, which flourished in the mid-nineteenth century. The company furnished an estimated 40% of all the gunpowder used during the Civil War. Surviving friom the company’s original complex of buildings is a barn built around 1845. Constructed as a horse barn, it was converted by Ralph Sweet for Square Dancing in 1959. The Powder Mill Barn (also known as the Powder Hollow Barn) is also a popular rental hall for weddings, auctions and other events.

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