Archive for the ‘Tudor Revival’ Category

Rowayton Community Center and Library (1912)

Friday, November 25th, 2016 Posted in Libraries, Norwalk, Outbuildings, Public Buildings, Tudor Revival | No Comments »

Rowayton Community Center and Library

The building which know houses the Rowayton Community Center in Norwalk was originally built in 1912 as the carriage house and stables for the Rock Ledge estate. The estate’s original mansion, built on the other side of Highland Street in 1911, burned down and was rebuilt in 1913. The carriage house and U-shaped stables wings are constructed with a rough stone first floor and a half-timbered upper story with jerkinhead roofs in the Tudor Revival style.

The Community Center also houses the Rowayton Library. After an brief early attempt to establish a library in Rowayton in 1867, locals established what would become today’s Rowayton Library in 1903. Originally located in the former Craw Store, Craw Hall, at 101 Rowayton Avenue, the library moved into the former home of the Rowayton Fire Department in 1926 and finally into the former stables in the 1960s.

Rogers-Cooper House (1920)

Friday, September 16th, 2016 Posted in Houses, New Britain, Tudor Revival | No Comments »

32 Sunnyledge St., New Britain

The house at 32 Sunnyledge Street in New Britain’s West End was erected c. 1920 for Emma Jane Camp Rogers (1854-1940), widow of Daniel O. Rogers (1854-1915). It later became the home of James E. Cooper, a former judge who had become a vice-president and legal counsel at the Stanley Works. Cooper had previously lived in the house at 115 Vine Street in New Britain.

William C. Scheide House (1913)

Thursday, September 15th, 2016 Posted in Hartford, Houses, Tudor Revival | No Comments »

1414 Asylum Ave

Built c. 1913, the house at 1414 Asylum Avenue in Hartford was the home of insurance executive William C. Scheide. His son, Lester Beach Scheide (1897-1953), became an architect. The house was designed by architect Edward Thomas Hapgood.

75 Broad Street, East Hartford (1929)

Friday, June 10th, 2016 Posted in East Hartford, Houses, Tudor Revival | No Comments »

75 Broad St., East Hartford

Emil Schultz was a builder in East Hartford who lived in a house he built for himself at 140 Naubuc Avenue. His wife’s grandmother quit-claimed the property at 75 Broad Street to him in 1929 and he soon built there a Tudor Revival house to sell.

Renbrook School (1931)

Monday, April 25th, 2016 Posted in Chateauesque, Houses, Schools, Tudor Revival, West Hartford | No Comments »

Renbrook School

Renbrook School in West Hartford, a private school for children age 3 through grade 9, began in 1935 when several area families decided to start a progressive school. Originally named the Tunxis School, it was first located in a rented house on Albany Avenue in West Hartford. Within months it moved to a larger house at the corner of Farmington and Outlook Avenues and was renamed Junior School. In 1937 the school erected its own building on Trout Brook Drive. By the mid-1950s the enrollment had increased and the school needed to expand again. The next move would be to the estate called Renbrook. This was the name given to the West Hartford mansion built (c. 1931) by famed aviation engineer Frederick Rentschler and his wife Faye Belden Rentschler. Frederick Brant Rentschler (1887-1956) co-founded Pratt & Whitney Aircraft in 1925. In 1929 he purchased 80 acres on Avon Mountain and soon constructed a Tudor Revival/French chateauesque mansion on the site. After Rentschler‘s death his estate announced it would lease the mansion to a worthy non-profit. The Junior School was chosen and in 1958 moved to its new home, also taking the new name of Renbrook School. Read the rest of this entry »

Erwin Home for Worthy and Indigent Women (1891)

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016 Posted in Apartment Buildings, New Britain, Queen Anne, Tudor Revival | No Comments »

Erwin Home for Worthy and Indigent Women

Cornielius B. Erwin (1811-1885) was a leading industrialist and philanthropist in New Britain. At his death he became the benefactor of the Erwin Home for Worthy and Indigent Women, leaving funds for the project to the Pastor and Standing Committee of South Congregational Church. Opened in 1892, the Erwin Home continues to operate today as a non-denominational residence for “worthy women of limited means.” With an address at 140 Bassett Street in New Britain, it is a large structure with several additions. Architecturally the Erwin Home is an example of the English interpretation of the Queen Anne style. The earliest section of the building, designed by Melvin H. Hapgood of Cook, Hapgood & Co and erected in 1891, consists of two wings that extend along Bassett and Ellis Streets and join at a three-story corner tower. At the rear of the Ellis Street side, facing the building’s inner courtyard, is a small gable-roofed tower. The first addition to the Erwin Home, made in 1894 and designed by Hapgood & Hapgood, extends along Warlock Street. This connects to another addition built in 1914. These later sections feature elements of the Tudor Revival style. Further addition were made in 1971 and 1973.

An early description of the building appeared in The American Architect and Building News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 814 (August 1, 1891):

The late Cornelius B. Erwin, of the Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co., left a large sum in the hands of the committee of the Congregational Church, of which he was a member, for the purpose of having a building put up which should be an actual home for such beneficiaries as the committee should approve, saying in his will: — “it being my object in establishing said Home to aid the really worthy and deserving poor, and not to encourage those who neither are, nor desire to be self-supporting.” The architects have endeavored to carry out as closely as possible the desires of Mr. Erwin, and, instead of planning a large high structure having the appearance of an asylum, a low, rambling cluster of cottages has been arranged for, all under one roof, yet each little portion retaining its individuality.

The Domestic English style of architecture was selected as being the one best adapted for giving the desired picturesqueness and homelikeness so attractive to destitute and homeless women. [. . . .] It will be seen that the key-note of the whole design is the furnishiug of independent homes for worthy and indigent women. It is well-known that many poor but respectable people have a strong prejudice, even horror of anything which is suggestive of surveillance or a binding down to rules in an institution.

Read the rest of this entry »

Yantic Fire Engine Company No. 1 (1907)

Friday, March 25th, 2016 Posted in Norwich, Public Buildings, Swiss Chalet, Tudor Revival | No Comments »

Yantic Fire Engine Company

the Yantic Fire Engine Co. No. 1 was established in 1847 in the mill village of Yantic in Norwich. The company‘s service area would eventually grow to include Bean Hill, Plain Hill and Norwichtown. After their old firehouse burned down in 1906, a new one was built in 1907 and was first occupied in 1908.