Archive for the ‘Colonial’ Category

Grumman-St. John House (1750)

Monday, March 20th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Colonial Revival, Houses, Norwalk, Second Empire | No Comments »

The earliest core of the house at 93 East Street in Norwalk dates to at least 1750 (and perhaps earlier). It was built by Samuel Grumman, a carpenter and builder who came from Fairfield to erect Norwalk’s second meeting house. During the Revolutionary War, the Grumman House was at the center of the Battle of Norwalk in July 1779, when General William Tryon’s raiding forces burned much of the town. The house was damaged, but it was rebuilt in the 1780s and expanded in the nineteenth century. The current roof was added in the 1870s. In 1805, the Grumman family had sold the house to Stephen Buckingham St. John, whose descendants, including the Hoyt family, owned it until 1925. The building was subdivided into apartments in 1928.

In 2001, the neighboring Norwalk Inn & Conference Center purchased the house with the intention of demolishing it to make way for an addition to the hotel. Preservationists rallied to block these plans and preserve the historic house. Litigation ensued and in 2010, after an extended legal battle, a compromise was reached: the Inn would renovate the dilapidated building to contain extended stay suites with permission being granted to the Inn itself to expand to a third floor. The renovations were completed in 2013.

Samuel North House (1707)

Saturday, March 11th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Farmington, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 221 South Road in Farmington was built by Samuel North (1671-1707), a merchant, sometime after he acquired the lot in 1701 and before his death, in Boston, in 1707. The year before he had willed the house and farm to his then one-year-old nephew, Josiah North (1705-1777), who later sold it to his younger brother Samuel (1708-1796) in 1736/7. This younger Samuel‘s house eventually passed to his son, Samuel North, Jr. (1740-1806), and then to Samuel, Jr.’s son Linus North (1774-1828). The property was sold out of the North family in 1829 and has passed through various owners. Alterations were made to the house in the mid-nineteenth century. The farm continued in operation until 1947. Much of the surrounding land has since been altered by the construction of Interstate 84 and residential development, but the house still has a prominent location on an elevated site with views of the Hartford skyline.

Benedict Ives Homestead (1750)

Friday, March 3rd, 2017 Posted in Cheshire, Colonial, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 257 Fenn Road in Cheshire is described in Edwin R. Brown’s Old Historic Homes of Cheshire, Connecticut (1895):

This old but well-preserved house is situated about one hundred yards directly south of the Silas Ives place. The main part was built by Nathaniel Ives in about the year 1750. Nathaniel was the youngest son of Deacon Joseph Ives, Cheshire’s first settler[.]

Nathaniel Ives had six sons who all served in the American Revolution. His son Jotham, according to Brown,

took an active part in the defence of his country, enlisting under Captain Bunnell of Wallingford, whose company joined Wadsworth’s Brigade to reinforce Washington’s army at New York. He was engaged in the battle of Long Island, August 7. 1776, and White Plains, October 28th, the same year; also accompanied Washington on his retreat through New Jersey. On his return from the war, he became part owner in his father’s house, and later received a deed for his entire interest. He married Lillis Fisk of Providence. R.I.

As Brown relates, their son,

Benedict Ives built the addition to this house and resided here until his death, at the age of 83 years. Uncle Benedict was well known throughout the town as a man fond of his books and a good story. His wife, Betsy Bristol (Aunt Betsy she was called), was noted for her hospitality to friend or traveler, and it was a common saying, by those who frequently passed her door, that “If we can reach Aunt Betsy’s by noon, we are sure of a good dinner.”

Benajah Stone House (1730)

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Guilford, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 2655 Long Hill Road in North Guilford was built c. 1730. The original owner was Joseph Chittenden, Jr. (died 1794), a cooper by trade. It was later owned by Benajah Stone III (1708-1757), who was married to Joseph’s sister, Mary. Benajah sold the house on March 3, 1746 to Samuel Fyler.

Roger Hooker House (1769)

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Farmington, Houses | No Comments »

The Georgian Colonial house at 24 Main Street in Farmington dates to c. 1769, but it may incorporate the earlier home of John Hooker (1665-1745), son of Rev. Samuel Hooker, built around 1688. The house eventually passed to John Hooker‘s grandson, Roger Hooker, Jr. (1751-1830), who later sold it to Col. Isaac Cowles. It then passed to the Colonel’s son Maj. Timothy Cowles (1784-1858), who sold it in 1834 to store-owner William Gay.

Arthur Miller – Marilyn Monroe House (1783)

Friday, January 27th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Roxbury | 1 Comment »

Glimpsed through the trees in the image above is a house that was once the home of two of the most famous people of the twentieth century. Located at 232 Tophet Road in Roxbury, it has been much altered over the years. It was built for a Revolutionary War veteran and was later the residence of playwright Arthur Miller and his wife (from 1956 to 1961) Marilyn Monroe. The couple had originally planned to replace the old farmhouse with a new home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, but they decided the plan produced by the famous architect was too impractical and expensive. According to Homes of Old Woodbury (1959), p. 247, the house was built about 1783 by Captain David Leavenworth. Sheldon Leavenworth sold it to Elliot Beardsley in 1847 and twenty years later it was acquired by Charles N. Ward. Frederick H. Leavenworth bought the house in 1888 and his son sold it to Miller in 1949, the year the playwright wrote Death of a Salesman at his first Roxbury home. Miller lived in Roxbury from 1947 until his death in 2005. The Leavenworth House has has remained in Miller’s family. Ten years after his death, his daughter donated a 100-acre parcel to the Roxbury Land Trust.

16 Barry Road, Oxford (1740)

Tuesday, January 24th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Oxford | 1 Comment »

The house at 16 Barry Road in the Quaker Farms section of Oxford was once thought to have been built as early as 1680, but a date of 1740 is now considered more likely. In the early nineteenth century the house was owned by the Tomlinson family. It was used in the mid-nineteenth century by Preston Hinman for his shoemaking business. Greatly deteriorated by the early twentieth century, Ralph B. Pomeroy purchased it in 1947, removed a later dormer window and undertook the house’s restoration to a colonial appearance.