Archive for the ‘Glastonbury’ Category

Goodrich-Stratton House (1740)

Friday, April 10th, 2015 Posted in Colonial, Glastonbury, Houses | No Comments »

Goodrich-Stratton House

The center-chimney colonial house at 501 Main Street in South Glastonbury was built around 1740 by Timothy Brooks on land he had acquired in 1730 from William Goodrich, Sr. In 1749 Brooks sold the house to William Goodrich, Jr., a sea captain, who drowned in 1753. His daughter Mehitabel, wife of John Welles, Jr. (who owned the Welles-Shipman-Ward House in Glastonbury), later sold the property to her step-brother, Samuel Stratton, Jr.

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Glastenbury Knitting Company (1860)

Thursday, March 19th, 2015 Posted in Glastonbury, Industrial, Italianate | No Comments »

Glastenbury Knitting Company

The Glastenbury Knitting Company (which, like the town where it was founded, later changed the spelling of its name to “Glastonbury“) was founded in 1855 by Addison L. Clark. The company produced men’s wool underwear (long johns, called “union suits” during the Civil War), reaching its peak during World War I when it produced 400,000 pairs for the U.S. army. Having acquired the Eagle Manufacturing Company woolen mills in Glastonbury 1855, the company built its first mill (c. 1860), just upstream on Salmon Brook, at the outlet to a small mill pond called Addison Pond. A fire in 1892 destroyed part of the mill, but Clark soon rebuilt and in 1897, a year after his death, the surrounding mill village of Eagleville was renamed Addison in his honor. The mill itself was expanded over the years, until about 1910. The company went out of business in 1936, during the Great Depression. The old mill was later used as a warehouse, but in 2005 it was acquired by developers who have converted it into upscale apartments under the name Addison Mill Apartments. The developers recreated a tower, destroyed by fire in the late 1930s, that had stood at the building’s western end. The new tower serves as a stairwell.

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M. C. House House (1845)

Saturday, February 28th, 2015 Posted in Glastonbury, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

1918 Manchester Road, Glastonbury

Built by a member of the House family, the house at 1918 Manchester Road in Glastonbury is a Greek Revival cottage built c. 1845. It has been much added to in the rear.

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Gideon Hale, Jr. House (1796)

Monday, January 5th, 2015 Posted in Colonial Revival, Glastonbury, Houses | No Comments »

Gilmore Manor

Two brothers, Gideon Hale Jr., and Ebenezer Hale, built the house at 1381 Main Street in Glastonbury in 1796. The house was known as “Gideon’s Temptation” because Gideon Hale, Jr. is said to have built it in a unsuccessful attempt to get a local woman to marry him. Although it was built in the late seventeenth century, the house’s current appearance reflects alterations in the Colonial Revival style made later. The house was acquired by J.H. Hale in 1911 and moved from its original location near Hale’s house at 1420 Main Street. The Gideon Hale, Jr. House is now Gilmore Manor, an assisted living facility.

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Moseley Talcott House (1851)

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014 Posted in Glastonbury, Gothic, Houses | No Comments »

2190 Main St., Glastonbury

A granite panel on the Main Street facade of the house at 2190 Main Street in Glastonbury identifies it as the home of Moseley Talcott. A stone house built in 1851, it was much added to in the twentieth century.

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Timothy Stevens, Jr. House (1743)

Thursday, November 27th, 2014 Posted in Colonial, Glastonbury, Houses | No Comments »

1179 Main St., Glastonbury

Happy Thanksgiving! The house at 1179 Main Street in Glastonbury is associated with Timothy Stevens, Jr. (1705-1746), who may have built it in 1743 on land that he had acquired from his father, Rev. Timothy Stevens. The house has also been given the later date of 1763. In the twentieth century the house was part of Red Hill Farm.

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Old Cider Mill (1870)

Friday, October 31st, 2014 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Glastonbury, Industrial, Outbuildings, Vernacular | No Comments »

Old Cider Mill, Glastonbury

Happy Halloween!! In keeping with the Fall spirit, today’s building is the Old Cider Mill in Glastonbury. Recognized as the oldest continuously operating Cider Mill in the United States (starting in the early nineteenth century?), the current building was constructed as early as the 1870s.

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