Archive for the ‘Victorian Eclectic’ Category

Sarah Vincent House (1850)

Saturday, November 22nd, 2014 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Ledyard, Vernacular, Victorian Eclectic | Comments Off

63 Hurlbut Rd., Gales Ferry

In the first half of the early nineteenth century, a store occupied the lot at 63 Hurlbut Road in Gales Ferry in Ledyard. Starting in 1831, the store was owned by Samuel and Ira Vincent. At Samuel‘s death in 1837, his widow Martha sold off the store goods. She owned the property until 1843 when it was inherited by Ira’s widow, Sarah Baker Vincent (1802-1885). Around 1850, she built a house in place of the store.

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Isaac C. Lewis Cottage (1882)

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014 Posted in Branford, Gothic, Houses, Second Empire, Stick Style, Victorian Eclectic | Comments Off

Isaac C. Lewis Cottage

The Isaac C. Lewis Cottage (although it’s much bigger than what people think of as a cottage!) is located at 255 Thimble Islands Road in the Stony Creek section of Branford. It is an impressive eclectic Victorian house with an outstanding variety of detail that features elements of the Gothic Revival, Second Empire, Eastlake, and Stick styles. It was built as a seaside cottage for Isaac Chauncey Lewis (1812-1893), president of the Meriden Britannia Company and one of Connecticut’s leading industrialists. The cottage was designed by the architect Henry Martin Jones (1828-1908), who had also designed Lewis’s much larger house in Meriden. The cottage was shifted about a hundred feet east, from one side of its lot to the other, in 1917. Read the rest of this entry »

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Gilbert Sisson House (1819)

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014 Posted in Houses, North Stonington, Victorian Eclectic | Comments Off

Gilbert Sisson House

Attention Readers: I will be at the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center tonight at 5:00 PM discussing and signing copies of my book, Vanished Downtown Hartford. Please come to this Nook Farm Book Talk if you are in the area! The house at 85 Main Street in North Stonington was built in 1819 (according to the sign on the house) or circa 1790 (according to the nomination for North Stonington Village Historic District). It was the home of Gilbert Sisson, a cabinetmaker and merchant. Born in 1769, Sisson married Desire Main in 1791. One of their sons, Charles Grandison Sisson (1807-1874), became a contractor and railroad president in New Jersey. Another, Noyes Sisson (1798-1872), was a cabinet maker and farmer in North Stonington.

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Daniel Eels House (1782)

Saturday, August 9th, 2014 Posted in Colonial, Cromwell, Federal Style, Houses, Queen Anne, Victorian Eclectic | Comments Off

Daniel Eels House

Daniel Eels (1757-1851), a cooper, built a house on Main Street in Cromwell around 1782. He moved to Whitestown, New York in 1795 and sold the property, which then had a number of owners until 1802, when it was purchased by William Smith, who then sold it to his brother Capt. John Smith. The house (373 Main Street) may actually have been built at that time, instead of the earlier date of 1782. In the late nineteenth century, this Colonial/Federal house was altered in the Queen Anne style.

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Jonathan Starr Office (1800)

Saturday, August 2nd, 2014 Posted in Commercial Buildings, New London, Victorian Eclectic | Comments Off

194 Bank St., New London

Dating to around 1800, the building at the corner of Bank and Pearl Streets in New London was part of the business operations of Jonathan Starr‘s family. Starr, who lived across the street, operated the Chester & Starr lumberyard and a grocery store at the site. According to the New London Heritage Trail plaque at the site: “Coffins and groceries both sold here.” The building now houses a restaurant and bar.

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Union School, West Haven (1890)

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014 Posted in Queen Anne, Romanesque Revival, Schools, Victorian Eclectic, West Haven | Comments Off

Union School

West Haven’s Union School is a former school building at 174 Center Street. Built in 1889 to 1890, when West Haven was part of the town of Orange, it served as a grammar school and for thirty-five years as a high school. It replaced a series of earlier wooden school buildings. Union School is a brick structure with terra cotta and East Haven red-sandstone trim. It was designed by Leoni W. Robinson, a leading architect in New Haven. An addition to the building, identical in plan and detail, was built to the rear in 1914. The former school is now used for senior housing.

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Capewell Horse Nail Company Office Building (1900)

Saturday, January 18th, 2014 Posted in Hartford, Industrial, Romanesque Revival, Tudor Revival, Victorian Eclectic | Comments Off

Capewell Horse Nail Company Office Building

The Capewell Horse Nail Company was founded in 1881 by George Capewell, who invented an improved machine for making horseshoe nails. Located next to the old Capewell factory in Hartford is the company’s office building (60 Popieluszko Court, formerly Governor Street), built around 1900. Designed by an unknown architect, the office building features an elaborate brick, brownstone and terra-cotta fa├žade.

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