Archive for the ‘Guilford’ Category

Frederick A. Fowler House (1848)

Saturday, November 21st, 2015 Posted in Guilford, Houses, Italianate | No Comments »

Frederick A. Fowler House

The Italianate house at 49 Church Street in Guilford was built c. 1848 by Frederick A. Fowler. He was married to Laura Brooks, sister of Captain Oliver N. Brooks, who also lived at the house for a time. Captain Brooks was the lighthouse keeper at Faulkner’s Island from 1851 to 1882. He was described in Forest and Stream (Vol. LXXX, No. 8, January 18, 1913):

It was a piece of heroism performed on the night of Nov. 23, 1858, that caused Captain Brooks to be spoken of as the “Hero of 1858.” That night the schooner Moses F. Webb went ashore in a heavy gale on Goose Island, not far from Faulkner’s Island. Captain Brooks, disregarding the weather, put out to the stranded vessel in an open boat, and safely took off the five men of the crew. This feat was widely heralded. The Life Saving Benevolent Association of New York presented him a gold medal and the citizens of New Haven gave him a purse of gold.

Captain Brooks was known to every Connecticut ornithologist of thirty years ago as a careful observer of birds, and as possessing in his home at the lighthouse a collection of birds of unusual interest. His name has been quoted in many a list of Connecticut birds during the last forty or fifty years.

Captain Brooks was a delightful man, full of stories of his experiences and observations. He was twice a member of the Connecticut General Assembly.

Richard Cruttenden House (1849)

Friday, November 20th, 2015 Posted in Greek Revival, Guilford, Houses | No Comments »

Richard Cruttenden House

Much altered over the years, the house at 65 Fair Street in Guilford was built in 1849 by Richard Cruttenden. He was descended from Abraham Cruttenden, one of the original settlers of Guilford.

Dr. Davis S. Brooks House (1790)

Thursday, November 19th, 2015 Posted in Colonial, Guilford, Houses | No Comments »

2864-Long-Hill-David-S-Brooks-1790

The house at 2864 Long Hill Road in North Guilford was built in 1790. It was the home of Dr. David S. Brooks. He married Annis Benton (b. 1764). Dr. Brooks delivered “An eulogy on the Death of George Washington,” at Guilford on February 22, 1800. The eulogy was published in New York in 1823. A facsimile of the only known copy of this work was reprinted by the Blackstone Memorial Library in Branford in 1920. Dr. Brooks later moved to New York, where he died in January, 1826. His son, David B. Brooks, graduated from Yale and practiced medicine in Cromwell starting in 1819. He also later moved to New York where he died in 1830.

John Evarts House (1850)

Friday, November 6th, 2015 Posted in Guilford, Houses, Vernacular | No Comments »

71 Broad St., Guilford

Not much is known about the origins of the house at 71 Broad Street in Guilford. It dates to c. 1850 and the original owner was John Evarts. It may have been built as a barn and converted to a house later on. Among various other changes over the years, the front entrance was moved from the side to the front and a porch was added to the west side (later removed).

James Monroe House (1865)

Saturday, October 3rd, 2015 Posted in Gothic, Guilford, Houses | No Comments »

James Monroe House (1865)

Having previously constructed the Gothic Revival house at 53 Fair Street in Guilford in 1860, James Monroe erected another residence at 63 Fair Street in 1865. The builder was William E. Weld. Typical of the Gothic Revival style, the house has prominent gables, board and batten siding and windows with drip molds.

James Monroe House (1860)

Friday, October 2nd, 2015 Posted in Gothic, Guilford, Houses | No Comments »

James Monroe House 1860

The first of two Gothic Revival houses built by James Monroe on Fair Street in Guilford is the house at No. 53, built in 1860. James Monroe was part of the firm of Jasper Monroe & Sons on Boston Street. He also erected several building around town. A later resident was George Cruttenden. The house has board and batten siding, typical of the Carpenter Gothic style, and also has Italianate-style entry porch.

William E. Weld House (1850)

Friday, August 21st, 2015 Posted in Greek Revival, Guilford, Houses | No Comments »

William Weld House

William E. Weld was a carpenter and builder and ran a lumber business in Guilford for almost fifty years in the nineteenth century. He built many houses in town, including the Albert B Wildman House (1852), the Frederick A. Weld House (built for his brother in 1852) the Benjamin Bradley House (1860) and the Julia Labadie House (1872). Weld built his own house in 1850 at 45 Boston Street.