Archive for the ‘Houses’ Category

Oliver Avery House (1818)

Friday, February 5th, 2016 Posted in Houses, North Stonington, Vernacular | No Comments »

92 Main St., North Stonington

The house at 92 Main Street in North Stonington was built in 1818. It is known as the Oliver Avery House. This may be the Oliver Avery who was born in Groton in 1757 and died in North Stonington in 1842.

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Daniel Tyler House (1810)

Thursday, February 4th, 2016 Posted in Houses, Italianate, Norwich | No Comments »

Daniel Tyler House

The city property listing for the house at 130 Washington Street in Norwich gives a construction date of 1810, which seems too early for this Italianate building. The National Register of Historic Places nomination for the Chelsea Parade Historic District gives a date of c. 1880, which is too late because it is known that Edith Kermit Carow, future wife of Theodore Roosevelt, was born here on August 6, 1861. The house has clearly been much altered over the years. Could Italianate features have been added to a much earlier house? It was the residence of Daniel Putnam Tyler (1799-1882), Edith‘s grandfather (Tyler’s daughter Gertrude had married Charles Carow of New York City). Daniel Tyler was a West Point graduate who became an iron manufacturer and railroad president. He served as a general in the Civil War, commanding a division in the Union Army at the First Battle of Bull Run. Although he took a substantial portion of the blame for the Union disaster at that battle, he was promoted and commanded a brigade at the Siege of Corinth, Mississippi. At the Battle of Harpers Ferry, September 15, 1862, Tyler’s division surrendered to Stonewall Jackson and spent two months as prisoners of war at Camp Douglas before being officially paroled. Tyler left the army in 1864, the same year his wife passed away. He owned his house in Norwich until 1868. By the start of the twenty-first century the building had become dilapidated and was condemned, but c. 2004 it was restored and subdivided into apartments.

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Burwell Tavern – Thomas House (1785)

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016 Posted in Houses, Roxbury, Taverns & Inns, Vernacular | No Comments »

Burwell Tavern - Thomas House

Little is known about the origins of the house at 4 Southbury Road in Roxbury, which originally served as a tavern and stage-coah stop. It is said to have been built in 1785 by a man named Burwell. He may be identified with one of several men named Brothwell (a variant spelling of the same surname) who lived in Roxbury at the time [refer to Roxbury Place-Name Stories (2010) by Jeannine Green, p. 17 for more details]. In 1839 the building was purchased by the Thomas family who owned it for over a century. The most well known member of the family was Harvey Thomas (died 1894). He raised and sold horses. A nineteenth-century barn that survives on the property almost certainly served as his horse barn.

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William Parker House (1646)

Monday, February 1st, 2016 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Old Saybrook | No Comments »

Parker House, Old Saybrook

The sign on the Parker House at 680 Middlesex Turnpike in Old Saybrook gives it the date of 1646. The National Register of Historic Places nomination for the house gives a date of 1679. In either case, it is one of the oldest houses in Connecticut. It was built by William Parker (1645-1725). Born in Hartford, Parker settled in Saybrook. As described in Family Records: Parker-Pond-Peck (1892), by Edwin Pond Parker:

Dea. William Parker was a leading citizen, and very prominent in church and state. He is said to have represented Saybrook as Deputy to the General Court in more sessions than any other person, excepting only Robert Chapman. He was Sergeant in Train-band as early as 1672, and in 1678-9 the town voted him five acres of land for services “out of the town” in the Indian wars. He was elected Deacon before 1687, and probably continued in that office until his death. He was a lay member of the Saybrook Synod of 1705 that framed the “Saybrook Platform” for the churches of Connecticut.

The house descended in the same family into the 1960s. It is now a commercial property.

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Capt. Ezra D. Post House (1844)

Friday, January 29th, 2016 Posted in Essex, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

Capt. Ezra D. Post House

The house at 28 Pratt Street in Essex was built in 1844 by Captain Ezra D. Post, a sea captain, who had previously resided in the house of his father-in-law, Gurdon Smith, at 9 Pratt Street.

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George Canfield House (1835)

Thursday, January 28th, 2016 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Southbury | No Comments »

George Canfield House

Built around 1835, the Greek Revival house at 756 South Britain Road in South Britain, Southbury was the home of George Canfield (died 1870). The house was built on the site of Aaron Downs’ house. Canfield married Cornelia H. Beecher (1800-1876) in 1824. Canfield was a harness-maker and his harness and saddling shop was located south of his house.

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Eleazar Fitch-John Ripley House and Store (1755)

Wednesday, January 27th, 2016 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Windham | No Comments »

Eleazar Fitch-John Ripley House and Store

At 19 Windham Green Road in Windham Center is a house built c. 1755. It has an attached structure on the east side that was once a store. The house has a nineteenth-century Victorian rear ell and the store has an eighteenth-century rear ell. The combined structure is known as the Eleazar Fitch-John Ripley House and Store. Col. Eleazer Fitch (1726-1796) served in the French and Indian War and served as high-sheriff of Windham County from 1752-1776. He later moved into a new grand house in 1763 that was destroyed by fire in 1923. During the Revolutionary War Fitch was a loyalist, although he was related by marriage to Windham’s leading revolutionary Eliphalet Dyer.

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