Archive for the ‘Houses’ Category

Elliot B. Plumb House (1860)

Saturday, July 22nd, 2017 Posted in Houses, Trumbull, Vernacular | No Comments »

A plaque on the house at 1885 Huntington Turnpike in Trumbull indicates it was built in 1860 and was the home of Elliot B. Plumb.

The only references I can find relating to Elliot B. Plumb relate to the following, as reported in the Journal of the Senate of the State of Connecticut for 1887:

Senate Resolution No. 92. Senator Hill of the Thirteenth District, introduced a resolution appointing Charles Beard of Huntington, and Elliot B. Plumb of Trumbull, Commissioners of the Wells Hollow Turnpike for two years from July 1, 1887.

The resolution was passed.

Senate Resolution No. 93. Senator Hill of the Thirteenth District, introduced a resolution appointing Charles Beard of Huntington, and Elliot B. Plumb of Trumbull, Commissioners of the Huntington Turnpike for two years from July 1, 1887.

The resolution was passed.

Alfred R. Wright House (1924)

Friday, July 21st, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Essex, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 134 Main Street in Centerbrook was built in 1924. It was the home of Alfred R. Wright, manufacturer of of bits and augers. The Wright family controlled the Connecticut Valley Manufacturing Company. Alfred R. Wright, born in 1888, retired as president of the company in 1956.

Stephen Fowler House (1770)

Thursday, July 20th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Guilford, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 2545 Long Hill Road in North Guilford was built in 1770 by Stephen Fowler (1744-1814) (it was once thought to have been built by his father, Daniel Fowler, in 1740). The house contained the first post office in North Guilford, and Stephen’s grandson, also named Stephen, served as postmaster until his death in 1869, followed by his daughter into the 1870s. Later, this Stephen’s grandson, Harold E. Fowler (1884-1981), owned the house, which has remained in the Fowler family.

Selden Gladwin House (1823)

Wednesday, July 19th, 2017 Posted in Federal Style, Haddam, Houses | No Comments »

Selden Gladwin (1794-1883) was a merchant, farmer and manufacturer who played a major role in the establishment of the Higganum Congregational Church. In 1816 he married Lydia Lane and in 1823 he built the house at 365 Saybrook Road in Higganum (in Haddam). The house remained in the Gladwin family until 1948.

Hezekiah Nichols House (1810)

Tuesday, July 18th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Trumbull | No Comments »

Interestingly, the house at 1810 Huntington Turnpike in Trumbull was built in 1810. A sign on the house indicates it was the home of Hezekiah Nichols. The Nichols family gave their name to the village where the house is located. The name on the sign may refer to the Hezekiah Nichols (1781-1835) who is mentioned in the Commemorative Biographical Record of Fairfield County, Connecticut (1899):

Hezekiah Nichols of Nichols, a son of Andrew Nichols, Esq., succeeded to the homestead and a goodly portion of the estate of Nichols. He was related to the Rev. James Nichols, the last Episcopal clergyman who went to Scotland for ordination, and to the first ordained in America — Rev. Philo Shelton.

His first wife, Prudence Polly Shelton, was his cousin and a cousin of Rev. Shelton. As related in Part II of Rev. Samuel Orcutt’s A History of the Old Town of Stratford and the City Bridgeport, Connecticut (1886):

Hezekiah Nichols became a member of the Congregational Church of Trumbull, but his second wife, Avis Peet, retained for many years her fondness for the Episcopal Church, in which she was born and reared, and the Rev. Mr. Rutledge, rector of Christ Church, Stratford, held mission services in the “north and south rooms” of Hezekiah Nichols’ house at Nichols’ Farms, which aided in preparing the way for the present Trinity parish of that place.

[. . . .] At the time of Mr. Nichols’ death his estate, in addition to tracts of land in Stratford and Huntington, extended from Huntington turnpike to Bear swamp road, a distance of nearly a mile. The greater portion of his lands at Nichols’ Farms is now in possession of his eldest son, William Grandison Nichols.

Judge Aram Tellalian Building (1891)

Monday, July 17th, 2017 Posted in Folk Victorian, Houses, Public Buildings, Trumbull, Vernacular | No Comments »

The former residence at 5892 Main Street in Trumbull was built in 1891. It was the home of a member of the Burroughs family, which produced cider at a mill across the street. The house was purchased by the town in 2002 and moved slightly to the south to serve as a town hall annex named in honor of Judge Aram Tellalian.

Rev. Noah Benedict House (1760)

Friday, July 14th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Woodbury | No Comments »

The house at 256 Main Street South in Woodbury was built in 1760-1763 by Rev. Noah Benedict (1737-1813), who served as the third minister of Woodbury’s First Congregational Church from 1760 to 1813. He dug and stoned the well with his own hands. Rev. Benedict built another house for his son nearby in 1795 and his own home was occupied by his widow until her death in 1861. The house then passed to Nathaniel Benedict Smith, son of Rev. Benedict’s only daughter, Ruth. It was acquired in 1874 by George Crane, who sold it to Charles Harvey in 1888. The house, originally a saltbox, has been much altered over the years, with chimneys replaced and eventually removed.