Archive for the ‘Houses’ Category

Ebenezer Morgan House (1853)

Wednesday, August 23rd, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Mystic, Stonington | No Comments »

The house at 61 Denison Avenue (formerly 14 Denison Avenue) in Mystic was built in 1853 for Ebenezer Morgan. This may be the Ebenezer Morgan (1831-1903) whose career is described in the Genealogical and Biographical Record of New London County, Connecticut (1905):

In early life he worked in the old Irons & Grinnell yard as a ship carpenter, later in the Greenman and Mallory yards, in the latter serving as a superintendent, but during the last forty years of his life he was employed in the Light House Department on the Atlantic coast, and for several years was superintendent of construction in the Third Light House District. By his uniform courtesy and characteristic integrity Mr. Morgan commanded the respect of all who knew him. He was well known in Masonic circles throughout the State, being a member of Charity and Relief Lodge of Mystic: Palestine Commandery, of New London; and Pyramid Temple, Mystic Shrine, of Bridgeport. He had taken the thirty-second degree. He was a trustee in the Methodist Church. Like other members of his family, he was a man gifted in many ways, and he developed talents in ship construction which brought him many important contracts. He designed and built the famous yacht “Dauntless,” the property of Mrs. Colt, of Hartford, and was also the builder of the steam yacht “Britanique,” a vessel 240 feet in length, owned in Baltimore. He was the superintendent of the great work of dredging in the Potomac river and filling in land around the Washington Monument, and under his superintendence the Erie Basin Dry Dock was constructed.

Ray S. Wilbur House (1840)

Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Groton, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 29 Pearl Street in Noank was built in 1840 for Ray S. Wilbur.

Thomas Harris House (1755)

Saturday, August 19th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Greek Revival, Houses, Wethersfield | No Comments »

The house at 117 Maple Street in Wethersfield was built c. 1755. It was the homestead of Thomas Harris (1695-1774) and remained in the Harris family for many years. The area around the Harris Homestead, where members of the family built other houses, was known as Harris Hill. Harris had a son, Thomas Harris, Jr., who died in 1774 from injuries sustained at a barn raising. His son, Thomas Harris III (1771-1829) had a son, Chauncey Harris (1816-1875), who was principal of Hartford’s South School, which was later renamed for him. Chauncey Harris also served as the city’s Superintendent of Schools.

Isaac Eaton House (1840)

Friday, August 18th, 2017 Posted in Chaplin, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 19 Chaplin Street in Chaplin was built in 1840 by Isaac Eaton (1801-1846). He married Maria Butler in 1824 and they had three sons: Horace, Isaac Lester, and Albert Dwight. Born the year the house was built, Albert Dwight Eaton died in 1851 at the age of eleven. His tombstone once stood in the home’s garden, but was removed when a family monument was erected in the Chaplin Center Cemetery.

Leverett G. Merrick House (1890)

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017 Posted in Bristol, Houses, Italianate | No Comments »

The house at 200 Summer Street in Bristol was built c. 1890. It was originally the home of Leverett G. Merrick, a grocer who owned two stores. His wife lived in the house after Merrick’s death in 1916. Marvin Edgerton, Treasurer and superintendent of Penfield Saw Works in Bristol, was a later resident. By the mid-1980s the building had been converted to use as an office, with a new block added to the front, replacing the original front porch.

Origen A. Sessions House (1875)

Monday, August 14th, 2017 Posted in Folk Victorian, Houses, Windham | No Comments »

The house at 283 Prospect Street in Willimantic was built c. 1875. It was originally the home of Origen A. Sessions (1842-1919), an undertaker (just across the street, at 284 Prospect Street, lived another undertaker, William Cummings). As related in the Commemorative Biographical Record of Tolland and Windham Counties, Connecticut (1903), Sessions worked from 1862 to 1872 for J. E. Cushman before

he began business for himself in the Atwood Block, where Puritan & Reade now are. From the start Mr. Sessions was engaged in the undertaking and furniture business, with which he combined frame making for all kinds of pictures. In addition to this line, he also conducted “dollar stores.” in both Willimantic and Stafford, his store at the latter place being the first of the kind and in these ventures he was associated with C. W. Raynes, under the firm name of O. A. Sessions & Company.

Mr. Sessions was the first occupant of the old Hamlin Block, where he maintained his store for several years. which was next established at No. 677 Main street, remaining at that point from the month of December, 1891, to April 1, 1902, when it was removed to the corner of North and Valley streets, in a building of which Mr. Sessions is half owner. In undertaking there has been a vast change since Mr. Sessions was first associated with it, and it is but strict truth to say that he has kept pace with every advance in his art. It is a work for which his fine taste, delicacy of thought and expression toward his patrons, and a tender respect and sympathy for their feelings, give him a peculiar fitness. His store is fully furnished with all the appliances for the successful management of his business, including a fine and new rubber-tired hearse, which for beauty of design and artistic workmanship cannot be surpassed anywhere. Mr. Sessions devotes special attention to embalming, and uses a preparation that preserves the features in a life-like expression. His services are in demand throughout Eastern Connecticut, and to every case he still gives his personal attention, after a business career of over thirty-eight years.

Dr. Joel Canfield House (1829)

Thursday, August 10th, 2017 Posted in Federal Style, Guilford, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 78 Church Street in Guilford was built in 1829, just four years after the street was opened. It was erected by Dr. Joel Canfield (1801-1877). According to his obituary by Alvan Talcott, M. D., in the Proceedings of the Connecticut Medical Society, Eighty-Sixth Annual Convention (1877), Dr. Canfield was originally from Chester and studied medicine with Dr. John S. Peters, of Hebron and Dr. Samuel B. Woodward, of Wethersfield. He then studied at Yale in 1823-1824.

He received a license to practice as a physican [sic] and surgeon in March, 1824, and on the 1st day of June following he commenced practice in Guilford, Conn., locating himself, the first year, in the parish of North Guilford. One year afterwards, he removed to the village of Old Guilford, on the same day with the decease of Dr. Joel L. Griffing, of Guilford, a physician of much promise, who died of phthisis at the age of 36. Dr. Canfield succeeded to his business, and had at once a large and lucrative practice. Other practitioners, however, came in after a few years, and divided the business with him.

On January 10, 1827, he married Lucretia M. Bartlett. She died in 1876 and, according to the doctor’s obituary, “he appeared never to have recovered from the shock.” Dr. Canfield was given an honorary medical degree by Yale in 1847. He was also active in the anti-slavery and temperance movements. As his obituary concludes:

On the morning of April 9, 1877, being in usual health, he took the cars for Saybrook, and from thence for Chester, hired some boys to row him across the Connecticut river, and was on his way to visit a brother and a niece in Hadlyme. After walking a few rods in a lonely road, and when out of sight of any human being, he was stricken down by failure of the action of the heart, and died almost immediately. Some five hours afterwards his body was found, his left hand still grasping a stone in the wall for support. His funeral was attended on the 11th, in the Third Church of Guilford, by a full assemblage of his relatives and friends, with very appropriate remarks from his pastor, Rev. George W. Banks. His age was 76 years and 30 days.