Archive for the ‘Trumbull’ Category

George & Florence Woods House (1820)

Wednesday, January 24th, 2018 Posted in Houses, Trumbull, Vernacular | No Comments »

The current home of the Trumbull Historical Society is the a house located at 1856 Huntington Turnpike, in the Nichols section of Trumbull. The house was built in 1820 on the property of the Nichols family, land that went back to Abraham Nichols, one of the original founders of the town of Stratford. The last of the family to live in the house was Florence Nichols Woods (died 1973), whose husband, George Woods (died 1972), was president of Bridgeport’s People’s Bank. Their estate was noted for its gardens. The couple left their property to the Nichols Methodist Church. The church did not require the property, so the house and land, known as the Woods Estate, were purchased by the town in 1974. Since 1978 the house has been rented by the Historical Society, while the grounds are now Abraham Nichols Park.

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Samuel Edwards House (1838)

Monday, December 11th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Trumbull | No Comments »

The house at 1745 Huntington Turnpike in the Nichols section of Trumbull was built in 1838. A sign on the house gives the name of Samuel Edwards. Could this be the Samuel Edwards who was born in 1800 and died in Trumbull in 1880?

Christ Church Tashua (1846)

Sunday, November 19th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Trumbull | No Comments »

Christ Church, the Episcopal parish in the Tashua area of Trumbull, was organized about 1760, by which time the residents had built a small wooden church. The parish began as a mission of Christ Church in Statford, the oldest Episcopal parish in Connecticut. In 1788, the parish voted to build a new church by subscription. As described in Vol. 2 of Samuel Orcutt’s A History of the Old Town of Stratford and the City Bridgeport (1886), the church was proportioned

not to exceed 50 feet in length, and 34 in breadth, and 24 in height. Also to be 24 windows in said church, of six-by-eight glass, thirty panes in each window, exclusive of the arch. This edifice was located, apparently, on the north side of the highway, where it remained until the present one was erected. The same year it was voted to call the parish Trinity Church, and by that name it was known in the records for many years. In June, 1790, the church was so far advanced that by vote of the parish the pew spots were sold at public veendue, the buyers being obligated to pay the prices bid and build the pews in one year from the time of purchase. The pews were to be in uniform style, as they were in the North Fairfield meeting house. The purchase money was applied towards the expense of building the church. The pew spots, except two, were sold for $310.66. The square pews were sixteen in number, being the wall pews round the building. The chancel was on the north side, and there was a door in the opposite side and one also at the east and west ends. In the body of church there were long, open seats free to all. A tower and spire were built at the west entrance in 1823.

The erection of the current church was begun in 1846 and the building was consecrated on May 28, 1847. While there have been additions, the church remains an excellent and very well preserved example of the Carpenter Gothic style.

Burroughs Cider Mill (1884)

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017 Posted in Industrial, Outbuildings, Trumbull, Vernacular | No Comments »

Happy Halloween! In keeping with the Fall season, today’s building is the Burroughs Cider Mill at 5913 Main Street in Trumbull. Built in 1884 by Stephen Burroughs, it remained in operation by the family until 1972 and was later restored, remaining at its original location. There is a recent book about the Burroughs Cider Mill by Serge G. Mihaly, Jr.

Trumbull Congregational Church (1899)

Sunday, September 17th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Trumbull | No Comments »

The Congregational Church in Trumbull was first established in 1730. Services were initially held at Pulpit Rock on White Plains Road. The first meeting house was built on the corner of White Plains Road and Unity Road. The congregation’s second meeting house was built in 1747 on what is now Church Hill Road, just west of where the Helen Plumb Building would be built in 1883. Over the years, the expanding road moved closer to the church and many a horse and wagon, coming down the hill on icy days, collided with the corner of the building. In 1842 a new church was erected on the same site, but located further back toward the Pequonnock River. A fire destroyed this building in 1898. The cornerstone for the current church, built at a new location at 3115 Reservoir Avenue, was laid on September 28, 1898 and the building was dedicated on on May 11, 1899. The church was constructed of stone quarried north of Beardsley Park.

Helen Plumb Building (1883)

Saturday, September 16th, 2017 Posted in Organizations, Public Buildings, Trumbull, Vernacular | No Comments »

From 1883 to 1957, the building at 571 Church Hill Road in Trumbull served as the Town Hall. It was Trumbull’s second Town Hall. The first Town Hall, purchased by the Town of Trumbull in 1862, was a building on Daniels Farm Road, formerly known as Beach’s Tavern. Some years ago the old second Town Hall building on Church Hill Road was renovated and it is now used by the Trumbull Chamber of Commerce. The building is named for Helen E. Plumb (1904-2001), who was town clerk in Trumbull for many years. Read the rest of this entry »

Trinity Episcopal Church, Nichols (1965)

Sunday, July 23rd, 2017 Posted in Churches, Colonial Revival, Trumbull | No Comments »

Trinity Episcopal Church, in the Nichols section of Trumbull, was organized in 1848. The original church was located at the corner of Huntington Turnpike and Jerusalem Hill Road. In 1939, the church was moved further north when the Merritt Parkway was constructed. The old church was replaced by the current one, at 1734 Huntington Turnpike, in 1965.