Archive for the ‘Chaplin’ Category

Chaplin Congregational Church Parsonage (1831)

Friday, May 12th, 2017 Posted in Chaplin, Federal Style, Houses | No Comments »

Dating to c. 1830-1835, the house at 47 Chaplin Street in Chaplin is the parsonage of the Congregational Church next door. It is also known as “Friendship House.”

Isaac Goodell House (1828)

Thursday, May 11th, 2017 Posted in Chaplin, Federal Style, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 318 Phoenixville Road in Chaplin was built c. 1828 by Isaac Goodell. It was later owned by Lester Bill and Newell C. Hunt. Jesse Hunt sold the house to George England in 1905.

Chaplin Congregational Church (1815)

Sunday, October 30th, 2016 Posted in Chaplin, Churches, Federal Style | No Comments »

chaplin-congregational-church

The Congregational church in Chaplin was organized in 1810 and the meeting house was erected in 1810-1815. As related in Richard M. Bayles’ History of Windham County, Connecticut (1889):

it was accepted as completed according to contract September 14th, 1815. It was not finished as it was intended eventually to be but so that public worship could be held in it. Neither pews, slips nor pulpit were provided, but the people went up with joy to the courts of the Lord, to worship Him in His own house. After a number of years a steeple was built upon the east end of the meeting house, a bell procured in 1837, the pews or slips were constructed, and a lofty pulpit placed for the elevation of the minister. Thus they intended to have their pastors settled over the people. Many years after, one of the pastors expressed the earnest wish to have the pulpit brought down from its great altitude, that he might be among his people as one of them, saying when his Master wished him to come up to heaven he hoped he should be ready, but while he was upon earth he did not wish to be placed somewhere between earth and heaven. The pulpit was brought down as he wished, and yet it was too high for some of his successors, and it has been brought down several feet lower, and now it has only the elevation of the modern pulpit. A number of years since, the people feeling the need of a lecture room or vestry, moved the meeting house about fifty feet on the hillside, and constructed a very commodious vestry under it, where the evening meetings and other religious and social gatherings are accommodated. Thus the same meeting house has been occupied during the entire history of the church, except for a short time when worship was held in the Center school house.

Walter Goodell House (1835)

Saturday, October 1st, 2016 Posted in Chaplin, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

44-chaplin-street

The house at 44 Chaplin Street in Chaplin was built between 1828, when Isaac Goodell purchased the land, and 1835, when he sold the property, now including a house and store, to his brother Walter Goodell. The house is a good example of the transition of the Federal to the Greek Revival style of architecture. The residence is now the home and studio of art quilter Catherine Whall Smith.

William Ross Public Library (1911)

Friday, September 30th, 2016 Posted in Chaplin, Libraries, Romanesque Revival | No Comments »

william-ross-public-library

The William Ross Public Library, built in 1911 at 57 Chaplin Street, is the original library building in the town of Chaplin. The library has since moved to the building at 130 Chaplin Street, a former elementary school built in 1948 and renovated for the library in 2000. The history of the library is described by librarian Ruth Eveline Snow in “The William Ross Public Library, Chaplin” in A Modern History of Windham County, Vol. I (1920):

About two years before the regular organization, a circulating library was kept first in the old Davenport House by Nettie E. Snow. At a town meeting October 7, 1901, the town gave a vote of thanks to Mr. Seth Moseley of New Haven for his gift of $100 toward the establishment of a free library. At the same meeting it was voted that the town should give $200, and “should spend annually for maintenance and increase $25.”

[. . .] The library has at present $50 a year from the town, $25 for heating, lighting, magazines, etc., and $25 for the librarian’s salary; $50 a year, interest on the William Ross Trust Fund. The library is under the state law and the state gives $100 worth of books each year.

The library was kept in different places. It had no regular library building. At the death of Mr. William Ross, a public-spirited citizen, it was found that his will provided money for a suitable library building. His widow added more money to the fund, so that a $6,500 brick building was erected. The dedication of the building was Saturday, November 18, 1911.

[. . .] The new building was built by George Eastman Snow. A guest book is kept on one of the tables and now shows the names of many visitors from many different states.

The library now numbers about two thousand volumes. Collections of books are sent each term, to each of the three schools in the town. The children use the library to a great extent, and it is very popular with the adults also.