Archive for the ‘Libraries’ Category

Old Canton Public Library (1920)

Tuesday, November 28th, 2017 Posted in Canton, Colonial Revival, Libraries, Neoclassical | No Comments »

The building at 26 Center Street in Collinsville was erected in 1920 as the Canton Public Library. The library had started in 1913 and was initially housed in the basement of the Collins Company office building. The 1920 building was a gift by Helen R. Collins in memory of her husband, Howard R. Collins, son of Samuel W. Collins, founder of the Collins Company. It was erected on land donated by the Canton Memorial Association in memory of the soldiers and sailors of Canton. The library moved out in 1999 and the building now houses the law offices of Burns & Lovejoy.

Andover Public Library (1927)

Saturday, October 14th, 2017 Posted in Andover, Colonial Revival, Libraries | No Comments »

A library association was first organized in Andover in 1885. In 1896 the public library was housed in the Congregational Church Conference House. A dedicated library building, called the Burnap Skinner Memorial Library, was opened at 355 Route 6 in 1927. It is now called the Andover Public Library.

Guilford Smith Memorial Library (1836)

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Libraries, Windham | No Comments »

In 1836, Charles Smith (1807-1893) built a Greek Revival house on Main Street in South Windham. The following year, he and Harvey Winchester bought a nearby factory that they used for the manufacture of paper, forming the Smith & Winchester Company. Charles Smith‘s son, Guilford Smith (1839-1923), was born in the house. He was a wealthy philanthropist who left $25,000 for the establishment of a library in South Windham. A trust and Board of Trustees were established for in 1930 and the new Guilford Smith Memorial Library, occupying the old Smith House, opened on April 4, 1931.

Plymouth Library (1932)

Monday, October 2nd, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Libraries, Plymouth | No Comments »

The Plymouth Library is a small private library, operated by the Plymouth Library Association and located at 692 Main Street, not far from Plymouth Green. The library was founded in 1871, largely through the efforts of Rev. E. B. Hillard (1825-1895), pastor of the Plymouth Congregational Church from 1869 to 1889. The original library building was destroyed by fire in 1929. The current building, designed by architect Raymond Percival, was dedicated in April 1932.

Acton Library (1873)

Friday, September 15th, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Folk Victorian, Libraries, Old Saybrook, Queen Anne | No Comments »

The original Acton Library building in Old Saybrook was erected in 1873 on land donated by Thomas Acton at the corner of Old Boston Post Road and Pennywise Lane. The Library was dedicated on July 4, 1874. Thomas C. Acton (1823-1898) was a New York City politician and Police Commissioner whose summer home in Old Saybrook was across the street from the library. Begun as a subscription library, it became a public library in 1904. A new Acton Library was constructed in 1967 at 60 Old Boston Post Road. The former library, at 40 Old Boston Post Road, was bought from the town by architect Robert Wendler in 1970. He converted it into a single-family residence.

Clark Memorial Library (1936)

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017 Posted in Bethany, Colonial Revival, Libraries | No Comments »

A private library, called the Bethany Union Library, used to meet between 1798 and 1812 at the home of Capt. Isaac Judd. In 1930, residents of Bethany seeking to start a public library for the town, met at the home of Treat B. Johnson (1875-1947), a Yale chemistry professor and a descendant of two of the founding members of the original library. In 1936 a town library was finally erected at 538 Amity Road through the gift of Noyes Clark in memory of his parents.

American Seamen’s Friend Society Sailor’s Reading Room (1841)

Saturday, July 1st, 2017 Posted in Italianate, Libraries, Mystic, Organizations, Outbuildings, Stonington | No Comments »

One of the buildings at Mystic Seaport is set up to represent the American Seamen’s Friend Society Sailor’s Reading Room. The Society was incorporated in 1833 to provide moral and religious alternatives to the saloons, boardinghouses and brothels frequented by sailors while in port. The organization is best known for the libraries it placed aboard American ships for the use of sailors. The Society’s records are now held the Collections Research Center at Mystic Seaport. This historic organization is interpreted for Mystic Seaport visitors in a building erected c. 1841 as a work shop and tool shed by Clark Greenman of the George Greenman & Co. Shipyard. Starting in 1951, it was used as the Seaport’s Children’s museum, before housing the Reading Room exhibit. The building originally stood where the Treworgy Planetarium was built in 1960. It was moved to its current location in 1959. Read the rest of this entry »