Archive for the ‘Folk Victorian’ Category

Comstock, Cheney & Company House #1 (1872)

Friday, September 8th, 2017 Posted in Essex, Folk Victorian, Houses, Vernacular | No Comments »

At 116 Main Street in Ivoryton is the first of a number of company houses built by Comstock, Cheney & Company, manufacturers of combs and other ivory products. The company sold the house to a private owner, Giles Augustus Bull (1851-1930), in 1900. Bull was a foreman at the company who married Anna Comstock, grandniece of company founder Samuel M. Comstock.

Former Chaplin Congregational Church Parsonage (1840)

Saturday, September 2nd, 2017 Posted in Chaplin, Folk Victorian, Houses, Vernacular | No Comments »

The house at 60 Chaplin Street in Chaplin was built in 1840. It was once the parsonage of the Chaplin Congregational Church, before the current parsonage at 47 Chaplin Street was used. There is also a historic barn on the property.

Noank Methodist Church (1902)

Sunday, August 20th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Folk Victorian, Gothic, Groton, Shingle Style | No Comments »

The building at 55 Sylvan Street in Noank, formerly used as a church, was built in 1902-1903. It combines elements of the Gothic and Shingle styles with distinctive Art Nouveau windows. As related in Historic Groton (1909):

The Methodist church was formed as a chapel, partially dependent on the conference for support, in the year 1878. After years of using what was known as the chapel, it became advisable to build a better and larger house, which was done in 1903. They have now an auditorium with a seating capacity of two hundred and fifty to three hundred, fitted with modern improvements. A well equipped kitchen and Sunday school rooms are below the main auditorium.

The Noank Methodist Church later merged with the Groton Methodist Church to form Christ United Methodist Church, which moved to a new building at 200 Hazelnut Hill Road in 1972. The former Noank Church was converted into a residence.

Origen A. Sessions House (1875)

Monday, August 14th, 2017 Posted in Folk Victorian, Houses, Windham | No Comments »

The house at 283 Prospect Street in Willimantic was built c. 1875. It was originally the home of Origen A. Sessions (1842-1919), an undertaker (just across the street, at 284 Prospect Street, lived another undertaker, William Cummings). As related in the Commemorative Biographical Record of Tolland and Windham Counties, Connecticut (1903), Sessions worked from 1862 to 1872 for J. E. Cushman before

he began business for himself in the Atwood Block, where Puritan & Reade now are. From the start Mr. Sessions was engaged in the undertaking and furniture business, with which he combined frame making for all kinds of pictures. In addition to this line, he also conducted “dollar stores.” in both Willimantic and Stafford, his store at the latter place being the first of the kind and in these ventures he was associated with C. W. Raynes, under the firm name of O. A. Sessions & Company.

Mr. Sessions was the first occupant of the old Hamlin Block, where he maintained his store for several years. which was next established at No. 677 Main street, remaining at that point from the month of December, 1891, to April 1, 1902, when it was removed to the corner of North and Valley streets, in a building of which Mr. Sessions is half owner. In undertaking there has been a vast change since Mr. Sessions was first associated with it, and it is but strict truth to say that he has kept pace with every advance in his art. It is a work for which his fine taste, delicacy of thought and expression toward his patrons, and a tender respect and sympathy for their feelings, give him a peculiar fitness. His store is fully furnished with all the appliances for the successful management of his business, including a fine and new rubber-tired hearse, which for beauty of design and artistic workmanship cannot be surpassed anywhere. Mr. Sessions devotes special attention to embalming, and uses a preparation that preserves the features in a life-like expression. His services are in demand throughout Eastern Connecticut, and to every case he still gives his personal attention, after a business career of over thirty-eight years.

Judge Aram Tellalian Building (1891)

Monday, July 17th, 2017 Posted in Folk Victorian, Houses, Public Buildings, Trumbull, Vernacular | No Comments »

The former residence at 5892 Main Street in Trumbull was built in 1891. It was the home of a member of the Burroughs family, which produced cider at a mill across the street. The house was purchased by the town in 2002 and moved slightly to the south to serve as a town hall annex named in honor of Judge Aram Tellalian.

Bellin Building (1917)

Saturday, July 15th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Folk Victorian, Seymour, Vernacular | No Comments »

The Bellin Building is an early twentieth century vernacular “triple decker” commercial building (with an intact storefront) at 14-16 Bank Street in Seymour. It was built in 1917.

American Legion Hall – Griffith Academy (1874)

Sunday, May 28th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Folk Victorian, Organizations, Wethersfield | No Comments »

The building at 275 Main Street, at the corner of Hartford Avenue, in Wethersfield, was built c. 1874-1876 as a Baptist Church. Declining membership led the church society to vote to disband in 1918 and deed their Main Street property to the Town of Wethersfield for use as a library. The town decided not to proceed with that project and in 1922 the building was sold to Russell K. Bourne D.S.C. Post of the American Legion, which changed it name to the Bourne-Keeney Post 23 in 1949. The name honors Russell K. Bourne, who was killed in action in 1918 during the First World War, and Robert A. Keeney, who lost his life when the USS Indianapolis was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine in 1945. The second floor hall of the building maintains the deck of the Minerva, used as training ground for the town’s Sea Scouts. In 2014, the Legion Post sold the building to the Griffith Academy, which teaches Irish dance. The Academy had been renting the Hall for many decades. The veterans continue to use the building as well, now renting the basement.