Archive for the ‘North Haven’ Category

Pierpont Store (1845)

Saturday, June 17th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Greek Revival, Italianate, North Haven | No Comments »

The building at 31 State Street in North Haven was built c. 1845 by Rufus Pierpont (1818-1855), adjacent to the 1795 Pierpont Homsetead, to serve as a general store. His son, Joseph Pierpont, continued the business, was operated by the family until 1942, when it closed during World War II due to a lack of help. A Greek Revival building, it was enlarged and remodeled in the Italianate style with a storefront on the west side and a side porch and projecting bay on the south side. These alterations were the work of Solomon Linsley, a Civil War veteran and local builder in North Haven.

Martha Culver House (1857)

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017 Posted in Houses, Italianate, North Haven | No Comments »

Ammi Culver, who owned a brickyard on the banks of the Quinnipiac River, built the house at 290 Quinnipiac Avenue in North Haven in 1857. After his death in 1865, his widow Delia lived their with her children, Benjamin and Martha, and Samuel Sackett, her second husband. Martha Culver (1864-1926) married Frank Smith, but soon divorced him. After traveling for some years, she lived the rest of her life in her old family home in North Haven. She later willed her house and land to the the town, stipulating that the property be used as a community gathering place that would include a library and recreational fields. The Montowese branch of the North Haven Public Library was located in the house for many years. Today Martha Culver Memorial is preserved by the North Haven Historical Society as a house museum and also contains the Brockett collection of early farm tools and equipment.

J. Boardman Smith House (1840)

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, North Haven | No Comments »

The ell of the house at 30 State Street in North Haven was built in the eighteenth century. This original home became a side-wing when the larger Greek Revival section was built in the 1840s. It was the residence of J. Boardman Smith and is thought to have once been the home of Oscar Benson, chauffeur of Frank L. Stiles.

Rev. William T. Reynolds House (1825)

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017 Posted in Federal Style, Houses, North Haven | No Comments »

The earliest residents of the hip-roofed brick Federal-style house at 2 Washington Avenue – 1 St. John Street in North Haven are not known. Much altered over the years, the house was built c. 1825 on the site where the c. 1680 homestead of Nathaniel Thorpe once stood. In the later nineteenth century the house was the residence of Rev. William T. Reynolds, who was pastor of the North Haven Congregational Church from 1863 to 1893. The house is now an office property.

David Bassett House (1790)

Monday, October 17th, 2016 Posted in Colonial, Houses, North Haven | No Comments »

David Bassett House

The house at 20 State Street in the Pines Bridge Historic District in North Haven was built c. 1790. Around the 1830s the house was willed to David Bassett by his grandfather. The current front entry porch was added in 1936 when the house was remodeled.

Alfred Linsley House (1780)

Monday, July 18th, 2016 Posted in Federal Style, Houses, North Haven | No Comments »

20 Church St., North Haven

The house at 20 Church Street in North Haven was built c. 1780-1800. It was the home of Alfred Linsley in the mid to late-nineteenth century. Today the former residence is home to the Murray-Reynolds American Legion Post 76.

Smith Brothers Carriage Shop (1868)

Thursday, June 30th, 2016 Posted in Industrial, Italianate, North Haven | No Comments »

Smith Brothers Carriage Shop

The single-story brick structure at 9 State Street in North Haven once served as the Smith Brothers carriage parts factory. The nomination document for the Pines Bridge Historic District gives the building a date of 1868, although the North Haven Historical Society website says it was built in 1846 by John F. Bronson, possibly as a match factory, and was acquired by the Smith Brothers in 1856. Because of a plaque found in the building engraved “Runaway Hole” it has been speculated that it was part of the Underground Railroad. Around the turn-of-the-century Angelo Ghiselli acquired the property, which became a restaurant. It was next used as apartments and is now a private residence.