Archive for the ‘Plymouth’ Category

Gaines House (1800)

Wednesday, February 15th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Plymouth, Taverns & Inns | No Comments »

Built c. 1800, the house at 2 North Street, corner of Main Street, in Plymouth Center is thought to have once been the Red Tavern, an inn on the Hartford Turnpike. In the mid-nineteenth century it was the home of George Pierpont and later became the rectory of the neighboring Episcopal Church, which is now the Baptist Church. Owned by the Baptist Church, the building is now called Gaines House.

SS Cyril & Methodius Orthodox Church, Terryville (1979)

Sunday, October 2nd, 2016 Posted in Byzantine Revival, Churches, Plymouth, Postmodern | No Comments »

ss-cyril-methodius-orthodox-church

Saints Cyril & Methodius Russian Orthodox Church in Terryville in the town of Plymouth was established in 1908. The parish was formed after a split among the Rusyn/Lemko membership of the St. Michael Brotherhood of Terryville between Greek Catholic and Russian Orthodox factions. The Greek Catholics built St. Michael’s Church in 1910, while the Russian Orthodox built Saints Cyril & Methodius Church on the corner of Fairview and Ames Avenues in 1912. This original church, later enlarged, was replaced by by the current building circa 1979.

St. Casimir Church, Terryville (1907)

Sunday, August 14th, 2016 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Plymouth | No Comments »

St Casimir Church

Polish immigrants settled in Terryville in significant numbers in the 1890s. At first they worshiped at Immaculate Conception Church, but in December 1900 the St. Casimir Society, a Polish fraternal organization, was formed and soon purchased land for a Polish Catholic church on Allen Street in Terryville. St. Casimir Church, 17 Allen Street, was dedicated on September 1, 1907. Since 1999 the two parishes of Immaculate Conception and Saint Casimir have been linked.

Wyllys Hinman House (1830)

Friday, July 22nd, 2016 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Plymouth | No Comments »

28 Marsh Rd

The house at 28 Marsh Road in East Plymouth was built c. 1830 by clockmaker Wyllys Hinman. The son of Philemon Hinman, Wyllys Hinman (1798-1888) later settled in Illinois. Hinman sold the house 1833 to Luther Driscoll (1791-1858), who had married his sister Eunice that same year. Driscoll also later moved to Illinois. Note: the house has been repainted a darker color since the above photograph was taken.

St. Michael Ukrainian Catholic Church, Terryville (1910)

Sunday, June 5th, 2016 Posted in Byzantine Revival, Churches, Plymouth | No Comments »

St. Michael Ukrainian Catholic Church

Ukrainian Catholics first settled in Terryville in Plymouth in 1895. They did come directly from Eastern Europe but initially settled in central Pennsylvania before relocating to Connecticut. They established a voluntary association called the Rus Ruthenian Brotherhood of St. Michael the Archangel in 1902. Having worshiped in New Britain from 1896 to 1904, the Archangel St. Michael Ruthenian Greek Catholic Congregation then began holding services in a school on Main Street in Terryville. The congregation acquired land on Allen Street in March 1905 on which to build their own church. The cornerstone for the new church was blessed on July 4, 1910 and St. Michael Ukrainian Catholic Church at 35 Allen Street was soon completed. A sacristy was added to the north side of the church in 1944.

Josiah Kimberly House (1827)

Monday, February 22nd, 2016 Posted in Houses, Plymouth, Vernacular | No Comments »

Josiah Kimberly House

The house at 144 East Plymouth Road in East Plymouth was built c. 1800. From 1827 to c. 1860 it was owned by Josiah Kimberly, a tanner and shoemaker. Kimberly took over the tannery business begun in East Plymouth by the Gaylord and Tuttle families. His son Eber E. Kimberly would continue in his father’s trade. As described in Francis Atwater’s History of the Town of Plymouth, Connecticut (1895):

The elder Cyrus Gaylord above alluded to, at one time also did carding in a building near the dam now standing on the same stream a short distance from his house, Josiah Kimberly at the same time using a part of the building for a tannery.

Somewhat later Mr. Kimberly had a tannery on the same stream between the grist mill and Stephen Blake’s. This tannery was afterwards conducted by Eber Kimberly.

St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church, East Plymouth (1792)

Sunday, August 2nd, 2015 Posted in Churches, Plymouth, Vernacular | 3 Comments »

St. Matthew's Episcopal Church, East Plymouth

The third oldest surviving Episcopal Church building in Connecticut is the former St. Matthew’s Church in East Plymouth. The church was built by a group of members of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Plymouth who lived in the eastern part of town and were displeased in 1790 when the church decided to build a new meetinghouse in Plymouth Hollow, now Thomaston, which was then in the far western part of Plymouth. St. Matthew’s Church was built in 1792 with support from Episcopalians from the neighboring towns of Bristol, Harwinton and Burlington. The largest part of the original membership of St. Matthew’s came from the northwestern section of Bristol. Many Episcopalians had settled there near Chippens Hill and wanted a church nearby. St. Matthew’s Church is a vernacular building, in many ways similar to contemporary Congregational meetinghouses. A rural community grew up around the church, which is adjacent to the East Plymouth Cemetery. The history of the building can be found in the History of the Town of Plymouth, Connecticut (1895), compiled by Francis Atwater:

The church was built in 1792, but was unfinished inside, for at a meeting held March 5, 1793, Isaac W. Shelton and Stephen Graves were appointed a committee to “lay out the money, and procure somebody to do off the inside of the church.” And again, at a meeting held at the church December 31, 1793, the following committee was appointed to “examine and find the most convenient way of doing off the church and make report at the next meeting:” Noah Andrews, Ira Dodge, Isaac W. Shelton, Calvin Woodin, and Timothy Sperry; at which meeting held January 13, 1794, it was voted to “finish the church in the following manner: to make a broad alley through the center of the lower floor, and finish the sides with pews in the most convenient manner, also to finish the gallery by making two rows of seats round the whole square, and a row of pews across the south end.” It was voted that the church be called St. Matthew’s at a meeting held October 19, 1795. On November 10, 1794, it was voted to adopt the constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church of Connecticut, and Caleb Matthews, the parish clerk, was instructed to attend the convention at Cheshire and request the Right Rev. Dr. Seabury to consecrate the new church.

In 1795, “the church was consecrated by Bishop Samuel Jarvis, second Bishop of Connecticut.” Various changes were made to the building over the years, as again quoted from Atwater (in 1895):

When first erected the building stood in front of its present location with its entrance at the south end, but in 1842, or soon after, was turned around and placed where it now is. The old square pews were removed about 1830.

[. . .] In 1871 or ’72, the church was remodeled, a chancel arranged, the old towering pulpit taken down, and doors taken off the small pews, also a ceiling made to reach across from one gallery to another. There is no chimney, and when a stove was put in the people thought that no one could speak in such close atmosphere. It used to be a large and full congregation, but has dwindled down to half a dozen old decrepit ladies, and service is seldom performed there.

The former church is now a private residence.