Archive for the ‘Commercial Buildings’ Category

A.F. & IP. Wood Building (1900)

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Tudor Revival, West Haven | No Comments »

A.F. & IP. Wood Building

At 519-529 Campbell Avenue in West Haven is a three-story Tudor Revival commercial building erected in 1900. It was built by the brothers (or father and son?), Alonzo Felton Wood and James P. Wood, who operated a drug store on the first floor.

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Lyric Hall, New London (1898)

Friday, November 14th, 2014 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Neoclassical, New London, Theaters | Comments Off

Lyric Hall

At 243 State Street in New London is Lyric Hall, a commercial building with an auditorium on the second floor. Originally a theater, by the mid-twentieth century the auditorium space was being used for dance classes. The Classical Revival building was designed by architect James Sweeney of New London. The building has had various owners and been used for different purposes over the years. It has recently undergone restoration work and has very recent new owners.

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Old Cider Mill (1870)

Friday, October 31st, 2014 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Glastonbury, Industrial, Outbuildings, Vernacular | Comments Off

Old Cider Mill, Glastonbury

Happy Halloween!! In keeping with the Fall spirit, today’s building is the Old Cider Mill in Glastonbury. Recognized as the oldest continuously operating Cider Mill in the United States (starting in the early nineteenth century?), the current building was constructed as early as the 1870s.

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Cheney Brothers Office Building (1910)

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Industrial, Manchester, Neoclassical | Comments Off

Cheney Brothers Office Building

Located at 146 Hartford Road in Manchester is a former office building of the Cheney Brothers silk mills. The office was built in 1910, replacing an earlier office. After the Cheney Brothers mills closed, the building was owned at different times by the electric company and Manchester Community College. Currently it serves as the offices of Fuss & O’Neill, an engineering firm.

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Old Town Hall, North Stonington (1809)

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Federal Style, North Stonington, Public Buildings, Vernacular | Comments Off

Old Town Hall

The building at 42 Main Street in North Stonington was built just before 1809 by Daniel Packer and Jedidiah Randall. It served as a store and for a time as a jail. It was moved from another spot on the same lot in the late nineteenth century. The building was the T.S. & H.D. Wheeler Store (a general store) before it was converted into North Stonington‘s Town Hall in 1904. A neighboring garage was converted into a new Town Hall in 1978. Today the old Town Hall is used for the offices of the selectmen, resident state trooper, and other town officials.

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Governor Fitch Law Office (1740)

Thursday, September 25th, 2014 Posted in Colonial, Commercial Buildings, Houses, Norwalk | Comments Off

Governor Fitch Law Office

Thomas Fitch (1696-1774), a lawyer, was Governor of the Colony of Connecticut from 1754 to 1766. His house, built around 1740, once stood on Earls Hill on the east side of East Avenue in Norwalk. The house was partially burned in the British raid on Norwalk on July 11-12, 1779. Fitch descendants occupied the reconstructed house until 1945. The section of the house that had survived the British raid (part of the house’s kitchen wing) was moved to Mill Hill in 1956 when the rest of the building was demolished to make way for the construction of the Connecticut Turnpike (now I-95). In 1971 the building was restored as a museum to resemble a law office such as one that Governor Fitch might have used in the eighteenth century. The foundations and chimney of the Law Office were constructed using stones from the cellar walls of the original Fitch House. The Law Office is one of three buildings at Mill Hill Historic Park maintained by the Norwalk Historical Society and the Norwalk-Village Green Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

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Twin City Building (1875)

Thursday, August 28th, 2014 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Italianate, Norwalk | Comments Off

Twin City Building

The building at 9-11 Wall Street in Norwalk was built in 1875 but Col. Frederick St. John Lockwood on the site where the general store of E. Lockwood & Sons operated in the eighteenth century. The building originally had retail stores and a market on the first floor, offices on the second floor and Lockwood Hall, a large hall for public functions and entertainments, on the third floor. The structure was remodeled in the Art Deco style and renamed the Twin City Building in the 1930s. In the 1950s and 1960s the second floor was shared by the Hilltop Athletic Club and Radio Station WNLK. Today the building’s principal tenant is The Fat Cat Pie Co.

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