Archive for the ‘Commercial Buildings’ Category

4 Parsonage Lane, Washington (1790)

Thursday, May 12th, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Houses, Vernacular, Washington | No Comments »

4 Parsonage Lane, Washington

The house that now stands at 4 Parsonage Lane in Washington initially stood facing Washington Green. It was built circa 1790 by Samuel Leavitt as a store. His son William continued to operate the store, which was adjacent to the Leavitt House. At some point early on it was moved to its current address. For a time it was used as a school before being converted into a residence.

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Cheney Block (1899)

Friday, May 6th, 2016 Posted in Colonial Revival, Commercial Buildings, Manchester | No Comments »

Cheney Block 1899

The commercial building at 969-985 Main Street in Manchester, called the Cheney Block, was built in 1899. It was the successor to the old Cheney Brothers general store which was located on the southeast corner of South Main and Charter Oak Streets and burned in 1898. The new building’s location, between Maple and Oak Streets, contributed to the shift of the town’s commercial district northwards to a former residential area. Many businesses, as well as the South Manchester Post Office, have occupied the Cheney Block over the years. The building has lost its original roof-top balustrade.

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Galpin Store (1862)

Saturday, April 30th, 2016 Posted in Berlin, Commercial Buildings, Federal Style, Greek Revival | No Comments »

Galpin Store, Worthington Ridge

The white-painted brick building at 943 (AKA 947) Worthington Ridge in Berlin was built c. 1862 by Henry N. Galpin as a general merchandise store, replacing a previous store building on the site that had been destroyed in a fire. As related in Catharine Melinda North’s History of Berlin (1916):

From the time as far back as the memory of the oldest living person goes, a prosperous store has been conducted at the stand south of the Freedom Hart place, which for many years has borne the sign of Henry N. Galpin.

Names obtained of those who have been at the head of the business here are as follows: Orrin Beckley, about 1810; Samuel Porter (died 1838, aged eighty-eight); Horace Steele & Dr. David Carpenter; Plumb & Deming, 1835; Benjamin Wilcox; S. C. Wilcox; Galpin & Loveland; Henry N. Galpin; Strickland Bros., and lastly E. E. Honiss. This store formerly carried a line of everything that the community might need, including drugs. Physicians’ prescriptions were compounded here until, by mutual agreement, H. N. Galpin surrendered his drug department to Alfred North, who, in exchange, gave up the sale of his drygoods to Mr. Galpin.

. . . . . .

Mr. Galpin was a public-spirited citizen, ready at all times to respond liberally to every good cause. He was also a man of sterling integrity, as one, who knew him well, said, she would not fear to trust him with the last cent she owned.

As described in New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial, Vol. III (1913):

Hon. Henry Norris Galpin, son of Norris Galpin, was born in the old Galpin home on the lower end of Berlin street, Berlin, December 22, 1820, died December 22, 1892. He attended the common schools and academy in his native town and at an early age began to work for a living, his father dying when he was but a boy. He began an apprenticeship in a harness maker’s shop, but found that he preferred mercantile life and entered the employ of Edward Wilcox as clerk. He continued with Mr. Wilcox and his successor in business, Samuel C. Wilcox, until after 1850 when he purchased the business and continued it successfully to the end of his life. He owned considerable real estate in the vicinity of the store building. In 1861 his building and goods were destroyed by fire, but he erected a new building and resumed business. Though partly paralyzed from the effects of a fall in 1883, he continued to manage his business.

He was one of the leading citizens of the town, a substantial and capable man of business, active and useful in town affairs. Before the civil war he was a Democrat, but he became a Republican in 1860 and continued to support that political party to the end of his life. For many years he was town auditor and in 1863-80-82 represented his town in the general assembly. He was treasurer of school district No. 5 from 1878 until he died, and was also trustee of the Selden school fund. He was one of the organizers of the Wilcox Cemetery Association and was its first president, continuing to fill that office until his death. In 1845 he was first commissioned as postmaster of Berlin and he held the office almost continuously until he died. The post office was in his store.

The Galpin Store, much altered over the years, operated as a store into the 1950s. It is now a private residence.

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National Hall (1873)

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016 Posted in Banks, Commercial Buildings, Italianate, Westport | No Comments »

National Hall

On the west bank of the Saugatuck River in Westport, at 2 Post Road West, is the National Hall Building. It was built in 1873 to house the First National Bank of Westport, two stores and a meeting hall called National Hall. The building was constructed at a time when the west bank of the river was Westport’s commercial and social hub and it represents the town’s growing prosperity after the Civil War. Horace Staples, a prominent Westport businessman and president of the bank was the driving force behind its construction. Various businesses have used the building over the years, including the Fairfield Furniture store and a luxury hotel, the recently closed Inn at National Hall, where President Bill Clinton once stayed. Today it is home to Vespa Italian Restaurant.

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Stearns Building (1897)

Saturday, March 12th, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Hartford, Neoclassical | No Comments »

Stearns Building

The Stearns Building, at 73-77 Pratt Street in Hartford, was designed by an unknown architect and constructed in 1897. The Stearns family owned the property until 1942.

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169 Bank Street, New London (1890)

Thursday, January 14th, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Italianate, New London | No Comments »

169 & 165-167 Bank Street, New London

Next to 165-167 Bank Street (the gray building on the right in the image above) is 169 Bank Street, a brick building on the corner of Bank and Pearl Street. In the mid-nineteenth century this was the site of a market run by Francis Holt. The current building was erected in 1890. It had a store run by W. M Lucy on the first floor with apartments above. The building suffered damage in a fire in 1947.

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Adams and Stone’s Blocks (1894)

Saturday, January 2nd, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Italianate, Winchester | No Comments »

Adams and Stone's Blocks, Main Street, Winsted

The two adjacent commercial buildings at 420-418 and 424-426 Main Street in Winsted were both built around 1894. The building on the right in the image above (No. 418, Winsted News Co.) was built by Horace O. Adams, who had his construction firm offices on an upper floor and ran a shoe store on the first floor. The building on the left (No. 424, Winsted Pawn & Jewlery) was built by Charles and Lester Stone, house painters, who had their offices in the building. Both buildings also contained residences as well as businesses.

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