Archive for the ‘Commercial Buildings’ Category

Pierpont Store (1845)

Saturday, June 17th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Greek Revival, Italianate, North Haven | No Comments »

The building at 31 State Street in North Haven was built c. 1845 by Rufus Pierpont (1818-1855), adjacent to the 1795 Pierpont Homsetead, to serve as a general store. His son, Joseph Pierpont, continued the business, was operated by the family until 1942, when it closed during World War II due to a lack of help. A Greek Revival building, it was enlarged and remodeled in the Italianate style with a storefront on the west side and a side porch and projecting bay on the south side. These alterations were the work of Solomon Linsley, a Civil War veteran and local builder in North Haven.

Former Nichols Store (1874)

Monday, May 22nd, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Vernacular, Willington | No Comments »

Although it is now used as a diner, the building at 12 Tolland Turnpike in Willington, next to the old railroad depot, was built as a store. The first store in West Willington opened in 1837. The business was acquired by John Carpenter in 1874, when the current building was erected. In 1888, Charles Nichols bought it, moved the building to its current location and added a grain room. Hans Hansen acquired the business in 1902 and added a post office section in 1936. By the time of his death in 1939, Hansen’s Grain and Grocery Store was being run by his daughter, Ester (1913-2014), and her husband, Floyd W. Phelps. It was renovated in 1957 to become Phelps Market, which later moved to Phelps Crossing nearby.

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Hotchkiss Block (1880)

Wednesday, April 26th, 2017 Posted in Ansonia, Commercial Buildings, Renaissance Revival | No Comments »

The Hotchkiss Block in Ansonia is a commercial building at 54-64 Main Street. It was part of a row of buildings erected by 1881 that were owned by W & L Hotchkiss Company, builders, which dissolved in 1885.

Hall Block, Southport (1895)

Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Commercial Buildings, Fairfield | No Comments »

On December 31, 1894, a fire in Southport destroyed the commercial/tenement building at the corner of Main Street and Harbor Road in Southport. Known as the Hall Block (possibly built in 1874), it was soon rebuilt in the Italianate style, with shops on the first floor and apartments above. The building, located at 252 Main Street with a flatiron form, was later altered converted in the Colonial Revival style into condominiums.

55 Wall Street, Norwalk (1890)

Saturday, April 1st, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Norwalk, Renaissance Revival | No Comments »

The red brick commercial building at 55 Wall Street in Norwalk was built circa 1890. The ground floor has a modern storefront.

Canfield Corner Pharmacy (1876)

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Second Empire, Woodbury | No Comments »

The Canfield Corner Pharmacy is a classic American drug store, complete with soda counter (although the latter is no longer functional). The pharmacy is located in a Mansard-roofed building at 2 North Main Street in Woodbury. The building was erected in 1876 as Stong’s Block by Nathaniel M. Strong, who had begun his drug business across the street in 1867. In addition to the drug store, the building contained a number of other businesses over the years and had a hall on the third floor used for meetings by various community groups. Henry H. Canfield (died 1949), who had been Stong’s head clerk, took over the business in 1900. Pharmacist Curtis Martiny and his wife Vera took over the pharmacy in 1950. After her husband’s death in 1954, Vera Taylor Martiny became a licensed pharmacist and continued the business, serving customers, including Roxbury resident Marilyn Monroe. Vera’s daughter Mary purchased the pharmacy in 1987. The building was restored after a fire in 1998. Read the rest of this entry »

Augustus Post House (1826)

Friday, March 24th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Federal Style, Hebron, Houses | No Comments »

The large Federal-style brick house at 4 Main Street (the corner of Routes 66 and 85) in Hebron was built c. 1820-1826 by Augustus Post, who was engaged in some kind of manufacturing. He soon sold the large residence and it passed through a series of owners that included Dr. John S. Peters and his business partner Abner Hendee. Peters was Governor of Connecticut from 1831 to 1833. In the late nineteenth century the house was acquired by W. S. Hewitt, who used it for his general store and post office. At some point the house was extended on the north side with a frame addition. The west side of the house has an entrance with a twentieth-century shed-roofed portico and the south side entrance was once altered to function as the storefront. The Hewitt family owned the house into the 1970s and it is commonly known as the Hewitt House. In 1978 the house was converted into office space. At that time the current Federal-style entrance on the south side was created.