Archive for the ‘Commercial Buildings’ Category

Tate Block (1890)

Monday, October 24th, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, New London, Second Empire | No Comments »

Tate Block, New London

The Tate Block, originally known as Tate’s Building, is a commercial block at 187-195 (aka 185) Bank Street in New London. It was built in 1890 on a site that was once the gardens of the neighboring Jonathan Starr House, built a century earlier.

Lund House (1820)

Friday, October 7th, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Houses, Vernacular, Watertown | No Comments »

38 Academy Hill, Watertown

At 38 Academy Hill in Watertown is a house that was erected in 1820 as a shop. It has been used for a number of different businesses over the years: first as Alanson Warren’s hat shop, then Russell Beer’s shirt factory, Dr. Walter S. Munger’s office (Dr. Munger served for many years as Watertown’s medical examiner and health officer) and finally Peter N. Lund’s tailor shop. It remained the Lund/Rose family residence for over 85 years. The interior was recently completely remodeled by a developer.

W. L. Wellwood General Store (1787)

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Coventry, Greek Revival | No Comments »

Wellwood Store

A section of the former W. L. Wellwood General Store at 1140 Main Street in Coventry dates to 1787, making it one of the oldest general store buildings in the nation. In 1820, the large Greek Revival portion was added to the original store and living quarters, which also attach to a later Italianate residence to the northeast. Another addition, containing the west wing grain room and butcher shop, was added in 1883. The Loomis family owned the store from about 1810 until 1881. After 1905 it was owned and operated by the Wellwood family. In 1974 the building went from housing a general store to becoming an antiques shop. It has more recently been the “Coventry Country Store” (as in the image above) and is currentlyCoventry Arts & Antiques.”

Linderme & Zurcher Building (1944)

Monday, August 22nd, 2016 Posted in Colonial Revival, Commercial Buildings, Middletown | No Comments »

423 Main St., Middletown

The Colonial Revival building at 423 Main Street in Middletown was built in 1944 for Linderme & Zurcher, a furniture and appliance store.

Neubauer Building (1896)

Saturday, August 20th, 2016 Posted in Bristol, Commercial Buildings, Romanesque Revival | No Comments »

248 Main

At 248 Main Street, corner of High Street, in Bristol is a three story brick commercial building built c. 1896 with remodeled first-floor storefronts. It is called the Neubauer Building and was possibly built by George W. Neubauer, a German immigrant who established himself in Bristol as a wood clock case carver before expanding into many other business ventures.

Essex Square Theatre (1925)

Saturday, July 30th, 2016 Posted in Colonial Revival, Commercial Buildings, Essex, Theaters | No Comments »

Essex Square Theater

The Benjamin Williams, Jr. Homestead was erected in 1814 at what is now Essex Square in Essex. In 1925 the old house was removed and replaced by the Essex Square Theatre building. The theatre showed movies and also had space for four retail stores and four offices. Films played there until 1972 and in 1984 the building was acquired by Talbots.

Colony Building (1922)

Wednesday, June 29th, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Meriden, Neoclassical | No Comments »

Colony Building, Meriden

Built in 1922 on the site where a train station had once stood for 28 years in Meriden, the Colony Building (39-49 Colony Street) is a Neoclassical Revival-style structure. The original occupants of the building included Emerson & Whitney Shoe Co. and Jepson’s Book Store. The latter store later moved to 31 Colony Street. It had been founded in 1910 by Louise J. Jepson and was later run by George S. Jepson and Mildred Jepson.