Archive for the ‘Commercial Buildings’ Category

Unity Building (1891)

Saturday, July 4th, 2015 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Hartford, Romanesque Revival | No Comments »

Unity Building

Happy Fourth of July! As described in my book Vanished Downtown Hartford (pp. 143-144), Hartford’s First Unitarian Society built a church, known as Unity Hall, on Pratt Street in 1881. It functioned as both a church and a public hall and was used by the Unitarians until 1924. They then moved to a new building on Pearl Street, which later became Ados Israel Synagogue, and then to their current building on Bloomfield Avenue. In 1891-1892, when they were still based at Unity Hall, the Unitarians constructed a five-story brick Romanesque Revival commercial building in front of their church. It was no doubt built to provide additional income for the church to add to that gained from renting out Unity Hall. A similar move was made by the Universalist Church of the Redeemer on Main Street, when it constructed a commercial building in front of the church in 1899 (it only stood until 1906 when Travelers acquired the property). Unity Hall was eventually demolished, but the Unity Building survives today. There is an interesting article about trouble early on with the buildings foundation: see “Foundation Stones Tipped: The Pratt Street Building Trouble Laid to a Surface Drain” in the Hartford Courant, April 13, 1892. The Unity Building has a Jacobethan first-floor facade that was added in 1928.

Share Button

Cook Building (1888)

Friday, July 3rd, 2015 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Hartford, Victorian Eclectic | No Comments »

Cook Building

The Cook Building is a three-story brick commercial building constructed in 1888 at 84-88 (then 36) Pratt Street in Hartford. The building was owned by Charles W. Cook, who may be the same Charles W. Cook (d. 1912) who was the partner of Charles S. Hills in the dry goods firm of Cook & Hills, which became C.S. Hills & Company after Cook’s retirement in 1896. The store was located at the corner of Main and Pratt Streets, not far from the Cook Building.

Share Button

Bishop Building (1935)

Monday, June 29th, 2015 Posted in Art Deco, Commercial Buildings, Gothic, Norwalk | No Comments »

Bishop Building, Norwalk

While some sources (including the nomination for the Wall Street Historic District) date the construction of the Bishop Building, a two-section commercial building at 64 Wall Street in Norwalk, to 1935, an article in The Norwalk Hour, “New Woolworth Opens Friday” (September 5, 1940), provides a different timeline. According to the article, the first section of the building was constructed by William Bishop in 1928 (or was it 1923?) on the site of the old Bishop Homestead. He was born in the Homestead, which he inherited and tore down for his building, which originally had 35 offices and three stores on the first floor. It was the first office building in the city to have a passenger elevator. In 1938, Bishop was approached by the F. W. Woolworth Company to open a branch of their five-and-dime stores in Norwalk. He purchased the adjacent Ambler Block and remodeled it to become part of an enlarged Bishop Building, in which the Woolworth store opened in 1940. Woolworth would later move to another location on Wall Street. Many other businesses have been located in the Bishop Building, including WNLK radio station and Kiddytown toy store (closed in 1995). It is now home to My Three Sons.

Share Button

Hazardville Hotel (1857)

Friday, June 19th, 2015 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Enfield, Greek Revival, Hotels | No Comments »

Hazardville Hotel

Dating to 1857 (or perhaps as early as 1845 according to the nomination for the Hazardville Historic District) in the village of Hazardville in Enfield is the former Hazardville Hotel at 312 Hazard Avenue. The hotel was built and operated by Sylvester Charter. Today the building is used as retail space. Read the rest of this entry »

Share Button

Landmark Square (1840)

Saturday, June 6th, 2015 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Italianate, Norwalk | No Comments »

Landmark Square

At 2 Knight Street, corner of Wall Street, in Norwalk is a three-story Italianate-style commercial building built around 1840. It has a two-story addition that extends on an angle up Knight Street. The building currently has retail and office space as part of a development called Landmark Square.

Share Button

Southport Telephone Exchange (1912)

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015 Posted in Colonial Revival, Commercial Buildings, Fairfield, Houses | No Comments »

Southport Telephone Exchange

The house at 35 Rose Hill Road in Southport was not always a house. It was built in 1912 by the Southern New England Telephone Co. as its Southport Telephone Exchange. The business office was on the first floor and the telephone switchboard operations were on the second floor. The Telephone Exchange moved to reef road in 1947 and the 1,722-square-foot building was converted to residential use. For a time it was divided into two apartments until recent owners returned it to being a single-family home. The property also has a guest house that was once a four-bay garage used by SNET.

Share Button

Former Universalist Church, Middletown (1839)

Sunday, May 17th, 2015 Posted in Churches, Commercial Buildings, Greek Revival, Middletown | No Comments »

Former Universalist Church, Middletown

The First Universalist Society was organized in Middletown in 1829. Ten years later the Society constructed a church on Main Street at the corner of College Street (then called Parsonage Street; the building’s current address is 203-207 Main Street). Declining membership in the early twentieth century led to the sale of the building to the Odd Fellows for use as a meeting hall in 1916. The building has always had retail space on the first floor (originally the basement, as a flight of stairs led up to the church entrance from street level) and there was a conference room in the rear of the first floor. The Main Street front is currently home to Thai Gardens Restaurant.

Share Button