Archive for the ‘Public Buildings’ Category

Old Town Hall, Willington (1876)

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016 Posted in Public Buildings, Vernacular, Willington | No Comments »

Old Willington Town Hall

Although it resembles a typical one-room school house, the building next to the Old Congregational Church on Willington Common was actually built as the Town of Willington’s first Town Hall. It and the church were erected the same year, 1876, symbolizing the role of town and Ecclesiastical Society for the community as represented by their two meeting spaces. The builder of the Town Hall was Lorenzo Ide. Eventually, in 1920s, the church itself came to be used as Willington’s second Town Hall.

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Old Mansfield Town Hall (1843)

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016 Posted in Mansfield, Public Buildings, Vernacular | No Comments »

Old Mansfield Town Hall

Although the Town of Mansfield decided to erect a town hall at a meeting held on December 3, 1838, electors wrangled over the details for three years. A building committee was finally confirmed on January 24, 1842 and the building was completed the following year. Located in the village of Spring Hill, near the geographic center of town, the old Town Hall was joined by a new Town Office Building on the same property, built in 1934. In the late 1970s, town offices moved to what is now the Audrey Buck Municipal Building. In 1980, the two older town buildings were occupied by the Mansfield Historical Society, which renovated the Old Town Hall to become a museum.

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Windsor Town Hall (1965)

Thursday, May 5th, 2016 Posted in Colonial Revival, Public Buildings, Windsor | No Comments »

Windsor Town Hall

In 1877 the Town of Windsor decided to construct two town halls, one at Windsor Center and the other at Poquonock. Town meetings were held in the two buildings in alternate years. In 1920 the building in Windsor Center became the sole Town Hall. It was located on the northwest corner of Broad and Maple Streets. It was demolished in 1967 for a parking lot after the current Town Hall was built in 1965. Facing the Windsor Center Green, the Windsor Town Hall was designed by Louis J. Drakos & Associates of Hartford and was built by Matthew J. Reiser of Elmwood, N.J.

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Yantic Fire Engine Company No. 1 (1907)

Friday, March 25th, 2016 Posted in Norwich, Public Buildings, Swiss Chalet, Tudor Revival | No Comments »

Yantic Fire Engine Company

the Yantic Fire Engine Co. No. 1 was established in 1847 in the mill village of Yantic in Norwich. The company‘s service area would eventually grow to include Bean Hill, Plain Hill and Norwichtown. After their old firehouse burned down in 1906, a new one was built in 1907 and was first occupied in 1908.

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Bozrah Town Hall (1832)

Friday, February 26th, 2016 Posted in Bozrah, Colonial Revival, Industrial, Public Buildings | No Comments »

Bozrah Town Hall

The building which now serves the Town Hall of Bozrah was built in the mid-nineteenth century (between 1832 and 1865). Its original owner was Asa Fitch, who owned the local mill and was expanding the mill village of Fitchville at the time. The building was once used as a sericulture plant and then as a recreation center for mill workers. It was acquired by the town in 1949. In 2010-2012, the Town Hall underwent an extensive renovation, in which it was completely gutted and rebuilt on the inside and an addition placed on one corner.

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Westport Town Hall (1923)

Saturday, January 23rd, 2016 Posted in Neoclassical, Public Buildings, Schools, Westport | No Comments »

Westport Town Hall

The Town Hall of Westport, 110 Myrtle Avenue, was originally built in 1923 as the Bedford Public School. In 1978 the school closed and the building was converted to become the Town Hall, opening in 1983. The Town Hall had previously been in a building at 90 Post Road East, built in 1908.

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Norwalk Town House (1835)

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016 Posted in Federal Style, Norwalk, Public Buildings | No Comments »

Old Norwalk Town House Museum

Located in Mill Hill Historic Park in Norwalk is the former Town House (or Town Hall), a Federal-style brick structure erected in 1835. Norwalk’s first Town House was erected by 1736 at the site of the old Trolley Barn at Wall and Knight Streets. A newer Town House was later built at Mill Hill, but it was destoyed when the British burned Norwalk on July 11, 1779 during the Revolutionary War. It took fifteen years before a new structure was erected in 1794. As described by John Warner Barber in his Connecticut Historical Collections (1836):

The old town house was pulled down in July, 1835. It had been long in a ruinous state, and much disfigured the appearance of the place. Some persons in the town who took upon themselves the responsibility of regulating things of this nature about the town, being impatient of the “law’s delay,” took advantage of the darkness of night, pulled down the obnoxious building, and piled up the rubbish by the side of the road.

The current building was built by by Captain Lewis Raymond, who used brick brought to Norwalk as ship’s ballast. The building was used as the seat of government until the Town of Norwalk and the City of South Norwalk were consolidated in 1913. Starting in 1924, the Norwalk Daughters of the American Revolution leased the building from the city, eventually adding a rear kitchen wing. The building was restored in 1965 for meeting and educational purposes. Still owned by the city, it is maintained, along with the rest of Mill Hill Historic Park, by the Norwalk Historical Society and the Norwalk-Village Green Chapter of the DAR.

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