Archive for the ‘Vernacular’ Category

Elliot B. Plumb House (1860)

Saturday, July 22nd, 2017 Posted in Houses, Trumbull, Vernacular | No Comments »

A plaque on the house at 1885 Huntington Turnpike in Trumbull indicates it was built in 1860 and was the home of Elliot B. Plumb.

The only references I can find relating to Elliot B. Plumb relate to the following, as reported in the Journal of the Senate of the State of Connecticut for 1887:

Senate Resolution No. 92. Senator Hill of the Thirteenth District, introduced a resolution appointing Charles Beard of Huntington, and Elliot B. Plumb of Trumbull, Commissioners of the Wells Hollow Turnpike for two years from July 1, 1887.

The resolution was passed.

Senate Resolution No. 93. Senator Hill of the Thirteenth District, introduced a resolution appointing Charles Beard of Huntington, and Elliot B. Plumb of Trumbull, Commissioners of the Huntington Turnpike for two years from July 1, 1887.

The resolution was passed.

Judge Aram Tellalian Building (1891)

Monday, July 17th, 2017 Posted in Folk Victorian, Houses, Public Buildings, Trumbull, Vernacular | No Comments »

The former residence at 5892 Main Street in Trumbull was built in 1891. It was the home of a member of the Burroughs family, which produced cider at a mill across the street. The house was purchased by the town in 2002 and moved slightly to the south to serve as a town hall annex named in honor of Judge Aram Tellalian.

Bellin Building (1917)

Saturday, July 15th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Folk Victorian, Seymour, Vernacular | No Comments »

The Bellin Building is an early twentieth century vernacular “triple decker” commercial building (with an intact storefront) at 14-16 Bank Street in Seymour. It was built in 1917.

Plymouth Cordage Company Ropewalk (1824)

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017 Posted in Industrial, Mystic, Stonington, Vernacular | No Comments »

Preserved at Mystic Seaport is a section of the original ropewalk of the Plymouth Cordage Company of Plymouth, Massachusetts. The company was founded in 1824 by Bourne Spooner, who had learned the art of ropemaking in New Orleans. He opposed slavery, so he set up his business back home in Plymouth, hiring free labor. Spooner ran the company until his death in 1870, producing rope for many kinds of vessels, including the Great Republic, the largest clipper ship ever built. By the late nineteenth century, the company had become the largest manufacturer of rope and twine in the world. The company remained in business for 140 years. The ropewalk remained in operation until 1947, when changing technology led to the end of its use by the company. In 1951, a 250-foot section of the 1,000-foot ropewalk in Plymouth was saved and reassembled at Mystic Seaport. It came with its machinery, which is no longer powered but is set up as though it were still functioning in order to illustrate the process of spinning rope.

Mitchell-Williams Store (1904)

Thursday, July 6th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Southbury, Vernacular | No Comments »

Featuring a distinctive “picturesque vernacular” design, the general store at 667 South Britain Road in Southbury has served the village of South Britain since it was built in 1903-1904. It was originally the store of George W. Mitchell, who built it on the site of a previous store that had burned. Mitchell also had interests in Kansas, where he was president of the Goodrich Cattle Company. Mitchell‘s daughter Abbie Evelyn married Charles Williams, who succeeded his father-in-law as proprietor in 1926. The second floor of the building has apartments. The store is also notable for having a cast iron storefront manufactured by the George L. Mesker Company of Evansville, Indiana.

Grove Clark House (1799)

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017 Posted in Houses, Vernacular, Windsor | No Comments »

The house at 1075 Poquonock Avenue in Windsor was built in 1799 by Grove Clark. This could be Capt. Grove Clark (1766-1846).

Ira Smith House (1791)

Monday, June 19th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Prospect, Vernacular | No Comments »

Ira Smith of Prospect was born in 1757 at his family homestead on Cheshire Road in Prospect. He served fifteen months in the Revolutionary War, going in place of his father, who was drafted in 1777. Ira was a private in Capt. Jesse Kimball’s company of Col. John Chandler’s 8th Connecticut Regiment. He was at Peekskill, at Germantown, detached for the defense of Fort Mifflin, and at Valley Forge. Smith later applied for a pension, giving a deatailed account of his service. After returning home, Ira Smith built the house at 61 Cheshire Road in Prospect sometime between 1779, when he married Elizabeth Judson, and 1791, when his father, Ephriam Smith, gave him 35 acres of the family farm. Ira and Ephriam were among the founders of Prospect’s Congregational Church. Ira died in 1835 and his son, John Andrew Smith, lived in the home until he died in 1878. It was then purchased by the Plumb family, who today operate Plumb Farm Flowers.