Archive for the ‘Vernacular’ Category

Old Town Hall, North Stonington (1809)

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Federal Style, North Stonington, Public Buildings, Vernacular | Comments Off

Old Town Hall

The building at 42 Main Street in North Stonington was built just before 1809 by Daniel Packer and Jedidiah Randall. It served as a store and for a time as a jail. It was moved from another spot on the same lot in the late nineteenth century. The building was the T.S. & H.D. Wheeler Store (a general store) before it was converted into North Stonington‘s Town Hall in 1904. A neighboring garage was converted into a new Town Hall in 1978. Today the old Town Hall is used for the offices of the selectmen, resident state trooper, and other town officials.

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681 Middle Turnpike, Mansfield (1820)

Saturday, October 11th, 2014 Posted in Houses, Mansfield, Vernacular | Comments Off

681 Middle Turnpike, Mansfield

The house at 681 Middle Turnpike in the Mansfield Four Corners section of Mansfield, not far from Storrs, was built sometime before 1820. It had a number of owners until 1843, when it was purchased by Rev. Aaron R. Livermore (1810-1892), who was the minister of Mansfield’s North Society Church, now Storrs Congregational Church, from 1843 to 1858. The house was next owned by the Fish family.

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West Street School (1760)

Saturday, September 6th, 2014 Posted in Schools, Southington, Vernacular | Comments Off

West Street School, Southington

The West Street School is a one-room schoolhouse at 1432 West Street in Southington. It was erected about 1760 and was in continuous operation, serving the northwest quarter of town, until 1946. It has been little changed over the years, retaining its eighteenth-century exterior features and a nineteenth-century interior, which includes a pot-bellied wood stove. The site also has the school’s associated outbuildings: a woodshed and a privy. In 1933, the West Street School Alumni Association was formed. In 1947, a year after the school closed permanently, this group, by then called the West Street School and Community Association, obtained a 99-year lease on the building from the town. The West Street School is currently maintained by the Southington Historical Society. The school originally sat closer to the roadbed, but West Street was widened and lowered in front of the school in 1977, so that the building is now at least twelve feet above the road.

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Capt. William C. Sammis House (1842)

Friday, August 22nd, 2014 Posted in Houses, Norwalk, Vernacular | Comments Off

Capt. William C. Sammis House

The house at 186 Rowayton Avenue in Rowayton, Norwalk was built in 1842 by Nicholas Vincent, a New York ship builder, for his daughter, Catherine Raymond Vincent, who married John Thomes. The house is named for a later owner, Capt. William C. Sammis (1818-1891). A coastal shipping trader in oysters until the railroad drove him out of business, Capt. Samis purchased the house in 1866 and became a farmer, sending his produce by train to market in New York City.

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Daniel Payne House (1830)

Saturday, July 19th, 2014 Posted in Houses, Vernacular, Windsor | Comments Off

Daniel Payne House

Built around 1830, the house at 27 Park Avenue in Windsor is one of many examples in the town of early nineteenth-century brick construction. The earliest known owner of the house was Clarissa Loomis, who sold it to Daniel Payne, a farmer, in 1855.

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Powder Mill Barn (1845)

Monday, July 7th, 2014 Posted in Enfield, Outbuildings, Vernacular | Comments Off

Powder Hollow Barn

Powder Hollow, in the Hazardville section of Enfield, was once the site of the Hazard Powder Company, which flourished in the mid-nineteenth century. The company furnished an estimated 40% of all the gunpowder used during the Civil War. Surviving friom the company’s original complex of buildings is a barn built around 1845. Constructed as a horse barn, it was converted by Ralph Sweet for Square Dancing in 1959. The Powder Mill Barn (also known as the Powder Hollow Barn) is also a popular rental hall for weddings, auctions and other events.

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Wassuc School (1840)

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014 Posted in Glastonbury, Schools, Vernacular | Comments Off

Wassuc School

The former Wassuc schoolhouse, at 184 Wassuc Road in Glastonbury was built around 1840 to serve students in the east part of town. The building has since been converted into a residence and has a later wing addition.

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