Archive for the ‘Vernacular’ Category

Davidson Carriage Barn (1885)

Saturday, November 12th, 2016 Posted in Bethany, Outbuildings, Vernacular | No Comments »

Carriage Barn

At 254 Carrington Road, across from the Davidson House, 539 Litchfield Turnpike, in Bethany is the a historic carriage barn. It was erected c. 1885, a few years after S. G. Davidson built the farmhouse. According to local tradition, the barn was used for blacksmithing. It may also have housed equipment used by the Davidson Telephone Exchange System. This company, run by S. G. Davidson’s son, Tyler D. Davidson, installed five phone lines in Bethany between 1898 and 1903. Phone installation was free, but subscribers paid a $12 yearly rental fee. The Southern New England Telephone Company took over the system in 1907.

Old Town Hall, Southbury (1873)

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016 Posted in Italianate, Public Buildings, Southbury, Vernacular | No Comments »

Old Town Hall Museum, Southbury

Southbury‘s first Town Hall was built in 1873 in the South Britain section of town. In the preceding years South Britain had developed as an industrial center and come to rival Southbury’s town center in importance. Annual town meetings had alternated between the two until South Britain used its influence to have the Town Hall erected at 624 South Britain Road, just before a period of industrial decline set in. The building continued to serve as the center of town government until 1964. It is now operated as a museum by the Southbury Historical Society.

Ephraim West House (1850)

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016 Posted in Houses, Suffield, Vernacular | No Comments »

222 South Main St., Suffield

The house at 222 South Main Street in Suffield was built c. 1850-1870 by Ephraim West. The house acquired its current appearance when decorative elements were applied that had been removed from the First Congregational Church during renovations after the 1938 hurricane.

Conference House (1830)

Monday, October 31st, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Glastonbury, Houses, Organizations, Schools, Vernacular | No Comments »

Conference House, Glastonbury

Happy Halloween! The Conference House is a building in Glastonbury, built around 1830, that possibly once stood where the First Church of Glastonbury was erected in 1837. It was moved to another site down Main Street, just north of the Joseph Wright House. Called the Conference House, the church used it for meetings, lectures and concerts. Starting in the late 1830s it was used as a private school run by one of Deacon Wright’s sons. In 1894, Deborah Goodrich Keene, who lived at 2016 Main Street, the Hale-Goodrich House, bought the building and moved it across the street to its current address of 2000 Main Street. In 1911 she leased the house to Glastonbury’s first telephone switchboard. She later converted it into a private residence. Floodwaters from Hubbard Brook almost reached the roofline of the house in 1936.

Sally Keeney House (1840)

Friday, October 28th, 2016 Posted in East Hartford, Houses, Vernacular | No Comments »

Sally Keeney House

Ira Anderson, a prosperous farmer, built the house at 224 Naubuc Avenue on his land in Hockanum in East Hartford c. 1840 for Sally Keeney. In 1873 she sold it to Edmund A. Fox. The house has been much altered.

Glass Factory School (1854)

Saturday, October 8th, 2016 Posted in Schools, Vernacular, Willington | No Comments »

Glass Factory District School, Willington

The Willington Glass Company, founded in 1814, gave its name to the Glass Factory School District in the Town of Willington. The district was served by a one-room schoolhouse, located at the modern address of 18 Glass Factory School Road. According to page 107 of the book A Glimpse of Willington’s Past by Isabel B. Weigold, published by the Willington Historical Society in 1991, the school was erected in 1858. A sign on the building gives a date of 1854. It replaced an earlier school on the site, dating back perhaps to 1727. After the school districts were consolidated, Albert Benjamin bought the house and converted it into a residence in 1936.

Lund House (1820)

Friday, October 7th, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Houses, Vernacular, Watertown | No Comments »

38 Academy Hill, Watertown

At 38 Academy Hill in Watertown is a house that was erected in 1820 as a shop. It has been used for a number of different businesses over the years: first as Alanson Warren’s hat shop, then Russell Beer’s shirt factory, Dr. Walter S. Munger’s office (Dr. Munger served for many years as Watertown’s medical examiner and health officer) and finally Peter N. Lund’s tailor shop. It remained the Lund/Rose family residence for over 85 years. The interior was recently completely remodeled by a developer.