Archive for the ‘Vernacular’ Category

Cornelius Fowler House (1880)

Monday, August 21st, 2017 Posted in Groton, Vernacular | No Comments »

The house at 11 Cove Street in Noank was built in 1880 and has a modern entrance porch. It was the home of Cornelius Fowler, who may be the same Cornelius Fowler who was a veteran of the Civil War, serving in the Twenty-First Regiment Infantry Regiment. Cornelius and his brother, Sylvester Crossman Fowler (1848-1919), were lobster fisherman.

Ichabod Cottage (1795)

Thursday, July 27th, 2017 Posted in Houses, Ledyard, Vernacular | No Comments »

The village of Gales Ferry in Ledyard is named for Roger Gale, who from 1759 to 1764 owned the ferry there that crossed the Connecticut River. One of his successors was John Allyn, Jr., who owned the ferry rights from 1774 to 1793. He then built the cottage at 54 Hurlbutt Road in 1795. After his death in 1798, the cottage passed to his widow, Priscilla. In 1804, she leased her property to James Eldrege, who who eventually purchased it in 1806. According to tradition, the house was used as a training school by Commodore Stephen Decatur during the blockade of New London in 1813-1814. Ichabod and Dorcas Babcock bought the cottage in 1815. Ichabod Babcock (1758-1848) was a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Their daughter Caroline married Stephen Gray, who built the house next door in 1842. Thomas Latham acquired both houses in 1863 and later rented the 1795 house, which he called “Ichabod Cottage,” to various tenants. Latham, a teacher, may have used the cottage for his private school. The building now has dormer windows, which were added sometime in the twentieth century.

Martha Minerva Franklin House (1870)

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017 Posted in Houses, Meriden, Vernacular | No Comments »

The house at 63 Cherry Street in Meriden (built c. 1870) was the childhood home of Martha Minerva Franklin (1870-1968), one of the first people to campaign for racial equality in nursing. Franklin was the only African American graduate in the class of 1897 at Woman’s Hospital Training School for Nurses in Philadelphia. She sought to address discrimination in her profession and spent two years investigating the status of African American nurses. She organized a meeting in New York in 1908 that founded the National Association for Colored Graduate Nurses (NACGN) and became its first president. She later settled in New York, where she completed a postgraduate course at Lincoln Hospital and worked as a nurse in the public schools. She studied public health nursing at Teachers College, Columbia University, but retired before completing a degree. Franklin lived the rest of her life in New Haven.

Elliot B. Plumb House (1860)

Saturday, July 22nd, 2017 Posted in Houses, Trumbull, Vernacular | No Comments »

A plaque on the house at 1885 Huntington Turnpike in Trumbull indicates it was built in 1860 and was the home of Elliot B. Plumb.

The only references I can find relating to Elliot B. Plumb relate to the following, as reported in the Journal of the Senate of the State of Connecticut for 1887:

Senate Resolution No. 92. Senator Hill of the Thirteenth District, introduced a resolution appointing Charles Beard of Huntington, and Elliot B. Plumb of Trumbull, Commissioners of the Wells Hollow Turnpike for two years from July 1, 1887.

The resolution was passed.

Senate Resolution No. 93. Senator Hill of the Thirteenth District, introduced a resolution appointing Charles Beard of Huntington, and Elliot B. Plumb of Trumbull, Commissioners of the Huntington Turnpike for two years from July 1, 1887.

The resolution was passed.

Judge Aram Tellalian Building (1891)

Monday, July 17th, 2017 Posted in Folk Victorian, Houses, Public Buildings, Trumbull, Vernacular | No Comments »

The former residence at 5892 Main Street in Trumbull was built in 1891. It was the home of a member of the Burroughs family, which produced cider at a mill across the street. The house was purchased by the town in 2002 and moved slightly to the south to serve as a town hall annex named in honor of Judge Aram Tellalian.

Bellin Building (1917)

Saturday, July 15th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Folk Victorian, Seymour, Vernacular | No Comments »

The Bellin Building is an early twentieth century vernacular “triple decker” commercial building (with an intact storefront) at 14-16 Bank Street in Seymour. It was built in 1917.

Plymouth Cordage Company Ropewalk (1824)

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017 Posted in Industrial, Mystic, Stonington, Vernacular | No Comments »

Preserved at Mystic Seaport is a section of the original ropewalk of the Plymouth Cordage Company of Plymouth, Massachusetts. The company was founded in 1824 by Bourne Spooner, who had learned the art of ropemaking in New Orleans. He opposed slavery, so he set up his business back home in Plymouth, hiring free labor. Spooner ran the company until his death in 1870, producing rope for many kinds of vessels, including the Great Republic, the largest clipper ship ever built. By the late nineteenth century, the company had become the largest manufacturer of rope and twine in the world. The company remained in business for 140 years. The ropewalk remained in operation until 1947, when changing technology led to the end of its use by the company. In 1951, a 250-foot section of the 1,000-foot ropewalk in Plymouth was saved and reassembled at Mystic Seaport. It came with its machinery, which is no longer powered but is set up as though it were still functioning in order to illustrate the process of spinning rope.