Archive for the ‘Vernacular’ Category

Downs House (1750)

Thursday, January 12th, 2017 Posted in Houses, Southbury, Vernacular | No Comments »

32 East Flat Hill Rd., South Britain

According to a guide to the South Britain Historic District, produced by the Town of Southbury, the house at 32 East Flat Hill Road, called the Downs House, was acquired as a residence by the minister of the South Britain Congregational Church in 1791. Does this relate it to the Moses Downs House at 639 South Britain Road? Further, the guide indicates that it was used in the 1870s for a school for girls and the lower level was once a tavern. The National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination for the South Britain Historic District dates the house to 1750 (based on assessor’s records) and indicates it was once a toll house.

Nicholas Vincent House (1842)

Thursday, January 5th, 2017 Posted in Folk Victorian, Houses, Norwalk, Vernacular | No Comments »

Nicholas Vincent, New York ship builder, erected the house at 184 Rowayton Avenue in Rowayton, Norwalk in 1842 for his son John R. Vincent. The house next door was built the same year for his daughter, Catherine. John R. Vincent was a ship carpenter who also owned a livery stable and a saloon.

Salvation Army, Bristol (1891)

Sunday, December 25th, 2016 Posted in Bristol, Churches, Vernacular | No Comments »

Merry Christmas! Pictured above is the Salvation Army’s Bristol Worship and Service Center at 19 Stearns Street in Bristol. Much altered over the years, the building was erected in 1891 for the Swedish Lutheran Lebanon Congregational Church (later simplified to Lebanon Lutheran Church), founded in 1887. In 1963 Lebanon Lutheran merged with Bethesda Lutheran Church of Forestville to form Gloria Dei Lutheran Church. The newly formed church erected a new building on Camp Street in Forestville and the old building on Stearns Street was sold to the Salvation Army, which had previously had its headquarters on Prospect Street.

Dawson’s Corner Store (1884)

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Vernacular, Woodbury | No Comments »

The building on the left in the image above is the Woodbury Town Archive Building. Next to it, on the right, is a building that was opened in 1884 as the Corner Store by G. F. Morris and Louis E. Dawson. They sold dry goods, clothing and groceries. Starting in 1889, Morris was also the postmaster, a position taken over by Dawson when Morris left for another store in Hotchkissville in 1893. The building had several additions over the years as the store continued under the management of Louis Dawson’s sons, L. Clyde and Jim Dawson. The store eventually closed in the 1940s.

Davidson Carriage Barn (1885)

Saturday, November 12th, 2016 Posted in Bethany, Outbuildings, Vernacular | No Comments »

Carriage Barn

At 254 Carrington Road, across from the Davidson House, 539 Litchfield Turnpike, in Bethany is the a historic carriage barn. It was erected c. 1885, a few years after S. G. Davidson built the farmhouse. According to local tradition, the barn was used for blacksmithing. It may also have housed equipment used by the Davidson Telephone Exchange System. This company, run by S. G. Davidson’s son, Tyler D. Davidson, installed five phone lines in Bethany between 1898 and 1903. Phone installation was free, but subscribers paid a $12 yearly rental fee. The Southern New England Telephone Company took over the system in 1907.

Old Town Hall, Southbury (1873)

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016 Posted in Italianate, Public Buildings, Southbury, Vernacular | No Comments »

Old Town Hall Museum, Southbury

Southbury‘s first Town Hall was built in 1873 in the South Britain section of town. In the preceding years South Britain had developed as an industrial center and come to rival Southbury’s town center in importance. Annual town meetings had alternated between the two until South Britain used its influence to have the Town Hall erected at 624 South Britain Road, just before a period of industrial decline set in. The building continued to serve as the center of town government until 1964. It is now operated as a museum by the Southbury Historical Society.

Ephraim West House (1850)

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016 Posted in Houses, Suffield, Vernacular | No Comments »

222 South Main St., Suffield

The house at 222 South Main Street in Suffield was built c. 1850-1870 by Ephraim West. The house acquired its current appearance when decorative elements were applied that had been removed from the First Congregational Church during renovations after the 1938 hurricane.