Archive for the ‘Colonial Revival’ Category

G. T. Loomis House (1905)

Saturday, October 7th, 2017 Posted in American Foursquare, Colonial Revival, Houses, Shingle Style, Stonington | No Comments »

The G. T. Loomis House, at 15 Lester Avenue in Pawcatuck, was built in 1905. The owner may have been the G. T. Loomis who was a photographer in the Westerly, R.I. area. Read the rest of this entry »

Plymouth Library (1932)

Monday, October 2nd, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Libraries, Plymouth | No Comments »

The Plymouth Library is a small private library, operated by the Plymouth Library Association and located at 692 Main Street, not far from Plymouth Green. The library was founded in 1871, largely through the efforts of Rev. E. B. Hillard (1825-1895), pastor of the Plymouth Congregational Church from 1869 to 1889. The original library building was destroyed by fire in 1929. The current building, designed by architect Raymond Percival, was dedicated in April 1932.

Valley Y.M.C.A. (1924)

Saturday, September 23rd, 2017 Posted in Ansonia, Colonial Revival, Organizations | No Comments »

The Y.M.C.A. in Ansonia dates back to 1866. Now the Valley Y.M.C.A., it serves citizens of Ansonia, Derby, Oxford, Seymour and Shelton. Its its current building is at 12 State Street in Ansonia. The building was erected in 1924.

Oxfordshire (1925)

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Houses, Oxford | No Comments »

Stephen Betts Church (1866-1951) was a businessman and land-owner in Oxford who founded the Stephen B. Church Company, which specializes in drilling high capacity artesian wells. In 1925, he expanded his original family homestead at 53 Great Hill Road. The old house, built in 1736, was split in half and the two parts were moved to be on either side of a new section in the center. Church named his thirty-room mansion Oxfordshire. A highlight of the house is the music room, which features an Aeolian Pipe Organ. Read the rest of this entry »

Acton Library (1873)

Friday, September 15th, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, Folk Victorian, Libraries, Old Saybrook, Queen Anne | No Comments »

The original Acton Library building in Old Saybrook was erected in 1873 on land donated by Thomas Acton at the corner of Old Boston Post Road and Pennywise Lane. The Library was dedicated on July 4, 1874. Thomas C. Acton (1823-1898) was a New York City politician and Police Commissioner whose summer home in Old Saybrook was across the street from the library. Begun as a subscription library, it became a public library in 1904. A new Acton Library was constructed in 1967 at 60 Old Boston Post Road. The former library, at 40 Old Boston Post Road, was bought from the town by architect Robert Wendler in 1970. He converted it into a single-family residence.

Wells Hall (1832)

Tuesday, September 5th, 2017 Posted in Colonial Revival, East Hartford, Neoclassical, Public Buildings, Schools | No Comments »

Much altered over the years, the Classical Revival building at 1110-1112 Main Street in East Hartford was erected in 1832-1833. It was known as the Academy and housed the East Hartford Select School, also known as the Classical and English School. The school eventually closed and the building was acquired by Jonathan Tremaine Wells in 1858. It became part of the larger Wells estate to the east, which included the famous Wells Tavern. Upon his death in 1881, Wells willed the Academy to the town for use as a public building to be called Wells Hall. In 1885 it became East Hartford’s town hall and a new front entry tower was added to the structure. In addition to town offices, Wells Hall also housed a library and the police department, including jail cells. On the second floor was a large public hall, used as a ballroom and as a meeting place for the Grange and the Grand Army of the Republic. When the current Town Hall building was erected in 1937, ownership of Wells Hall reverted to the heirs of Jonathan Wells, as per his will. For many years the building was the Old Town Hall Inn and Restaurant. In the 1930s to 1950s, the Inn had a dinner theater that hosted famous performers. In more recent years the building has been restored and expanded and a 1924 addition on the front of the building, which for many years blocked the 1885 entrance, was removed. Wells Hall now houses the offices of the East Hartford Board of Education.

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St. Mark the Evangelist Church (1945)

Sunday, August 27th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Colonial Revival, West Hartford | No Comments »

St. Mark the Evangelist Catholic Church, 467 South Quaker Lane in West Hartford, was dedicated on September 30, 1945. It replaced the original St. Mark Church on the site, which was destroyed by a fire of suspicious origin on June 24, 1944. Due to the scarciry of building materials during World War Two, that building had been a portable church, a narrow structure with a heating grate running through its center. St. Mark’s Parish Center was dedicated in 1971. As part of the Archdiocese of Hartford’s reorganization of parishes earlier this year, St. Mark’s merged with two other West Hartford parishes, St. Brigid and St. Helena, to form the new Saint Gianna Parish.