Archive for the ‘Meriden’ Category

Morse and Norton’s Block (1880)

Wednesday, September 27th, 2017 Posted in Apartment Buildings, Commercial Buildings, Italianate, Meriden | No Comments »

Morse and Norton’s Block is an Italianate-style commercial and apartment building built in 1880 at 72-80 East Main Street in Meriden. One of the two original owners of the building was Samuel L Norton (1821-1902). In more recent times, tenants had to abandon the building in early 2014 after the back wall of the eastern half partially collapsed. Work to repair the structure was greatly facilitated the following year when the building, still divided between two owners, became the property of a single owner.

J. Ferry & Sons Funeral Home (1937)

Monday, September 4th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Meriden, Renaissance Revival | No Comments »

Starting in 1890, John J. Ferry was a liverymen in Meriden. With his two sons, Thomas L. Ferry, Sr. and William A. Ferry, he formed the undertaking firm of John J. Ferry & Sons. John J. Ferry died in 1918, leaving the business to his sons. In 1937 they erected the building at 88 East Main Street in Meriden where the fourth generation continues the funeral home business.

Main Street Baptist Church, Meriden (1868)

Sunday, September 3rd, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Meriden | No Comments »

The church at 22 Crown Street in Meriden was built in 1868 as the West Meriden Baptist Church, later renamed the Main Street Baptist Church. Established in 1860, the church had an earlier chapel on the same site. The present church building’s tower was removed in 1946 and in the 1950s the Connecticut Bank & Trust Company built a branch right in front of the building. In 1997 the Baptist Church closed and sold the building to Faith Center Church of God in Christ.

All Saints Episcopal Church, Meriden (1893)

Sunday, July 30th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Meriden | No Comments »

As related in An Historic Record and Pictorial Description of the Town of Meriden, Connecticut AKA A Century of Meriden (1906):

A[l]though the present attractive edifice of All Saints’ Protestant Episcopal Church, was not occupied for services until Ash Wednesday, 1893, some eight years or more previous it became evident that the erection of a church was definitely contemplated for that section of Meriden. The first service was held in the dwelling house, 273 West Main street on December 13, 1885[.]

A women’s sewing circle began raising money to build a church. Their funds were augmented by a bequest of $10,000 by Mrs. Phoebe A. Hallam, in honor of her late husband, the Rev. R. A. Hallam, D. D., at one time rector of St. Andrews Church in Meriden. All Saints Memorial Church was built at 215 West Main Street and consecrated on November 17, 1893. In more recent years, as the parish faced declining attendance, they began meeting at Immanuel Lutheran Church on Hanover Street. The old church building on West Main Street was sold in 2009 and bought by Rock of Salvation Church (Roca De Salvacion).

Martha Minerva Franklin House (1870)

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017 Posted in Houses, Meriden, Vernacular | 3 Comments »

The house at 63 Cherry Street in Meriden (built c. 1870) was the childhood home of Martha Minerva Franklin (1870-1968) [this fact is in dispute, please see comment below], one of the first people to campaign for racial equality in nursing. Franklin was the only African American graduate in the class of 1897 at Woman’s Hospital Training School for Nurses in Philadelphia. She sought to address discrimination in her profession and spent two years investigating the status of African American nurses. She organized a meeting in New York in 1908 that founded the National Association for Colored Graduate Nurses (NACGN) and became its first president. She later settled in New York, where she completed a postgraduate course at Lincoln Hospital and worked as a nurse in the public schools. She studied public health nursing at Teachers College, Columbia University, but retired before completing a degree. Franklin lived the rest of her life in New Haven.

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, Meriden (1936)

Sunday, July 9th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Meriden | No Comments »

In the 1870s, Italian immigrants began settling in the northwest corner of Meriden. For many years they attended existing Catholic churches in the city, but soon wanted to found their own parish. The Diocese of Hartford established Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Parish in 1894. The first parish church was a wooden building on Goodwill Avenue. The current church, located at 109 Goodwill Avenue, was dedicated on February 16, 1936. Our Lady of Mt. Carmel School was established in 1944 after the parish purchased the Nathan Hale Public School from the city of Meriden. In recent years, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel and St. Laurent Parishes in Meriden shared a priest. Earlier this year, as part of a reorganization throughout the Archdiocese of Hartford, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, St. Laurent and three other parishes merged to form the new Our Lady Queen of Angels Parish, based at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church.

Fox Block (1905)

Monday, July 3rd, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Meriden, Renaissance Revival | No Comments »

The Fox Block, or Fox Building, at 88-92 West Main Street, corner of Butler Street, in Meriden, was built in 1905. It was designed by the Meriden architect David B. Bloomfield.