Archive for the ‘Churches’ Category

Bakerville United Methodist Church (1960)

Sunday, December 10th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Colonial Revival, New Hartford | No Comments »

The history of the Methodist church in New Hartford begins with the establishment of the New Hartford Society of the Reformed Methodist Church in 1845. A Methodist church building was erected on Maple Hollow Road in the village of Bakerville in the 1850s. It was destroyed by fire on September 23, 1954. Ground breaking for a new Bakerville Church, located at 1087 Litchfield Turnpike, took place in the fall of 1957. The exterior of the church was built first, followed by construction of the attached Fellowship Hall. It was in Fellowship Hall that the first church service was held on April 6, 1958. The church sanctuary was consecrated on December 11, 1960.

All Saints’ Episcopal Church, Ivoryton (1905)

Sunday, December 3rd, 2017 Posted in Churches, Craftsman, Essex, Shingle Style | No Comments »

All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Ivoryton was founded in 1895 as St. Mary’s Church, which met in various places, including private homes, until a church was erected at 129 Main Street. Land for the church was given in 1904 to the Missionary Society of the Diocese of Connecticut by Isabell J. Doane, daughter of Marsena Whiting Comstock of Comstock, Cheney & Company. The cornerstone was laid in 1905 and the church was consecrated on January 7, 1906. A parish hall was added to the church in 1948 and the neighboring house was acquired as a vicarage in 1959. The house was built in 1886 by William Griffith and his wife Lillian, another daughter of Marsena Whiting Comstock.

Church of St. Colman (1962)

Sunday, November 26th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Middlefield, Modern | No Comments »

The original St. Colman’s Catholic Church in Middlefield stood at the corner of Main and Stow Streets. The cornerstone was laid in 1886 and the church opened its doors on August 7, 1887. Construction was completed in 1889 and fourteen stained glass windows were installed the following year. It was a mission church under St. John Parish in Middletown until 1903, when it became a mission of the newly formed St. Francis Parish in Middletown. The last service in the old church was held on September 16, 1962, the same day that the new Church of St. Colman, located at 170 Hubbard Street, was dedicated. The church was granted full parish status in 1964.

Christ Church Tashua (1846)

Sunday, November 19th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Trumbull | No Comments »

Christ Church, the Episcopal parish in the Tashua area of Trumbull, was organized about 1760, by which time the residents had built a small wooden church. The parish began as a mission of Christ Church in Statford, the oldest Episcopal parish in Connecticut. In 1788, the parish voted to build a new church by subscription. As described in Vol. 2 of Samuel Orcutt’s A History of the Old Town of Stratford and the City Bridgeport (1886), the church was proportioned

not to exceed 50 feet in length, and 34 in breadth, and 24 in height. Also to be 24 windows in said church, of six-by-eight glass, thirty panes in each window, exclusive of the arch. This edifice was located, apparently, on the north side of the highway, where it remained until the present one was erected. The same year it was voted to call the parish Trinity Church, and by that name it was known in the records for many years. In June, 1790, the church was so far advanced that by vote of the parish the pew spots were sold at public veendue, the buyers being obligated to pay the prices bid and build the pews in one year from the time of purchase. The pews were to be in uniform style, as they were in the North Fairfield meeting house. The purchase money was applied towards the expense of building the church. The pew spots, except two, were sold for $310.66. The square pews were sixteen in number, being the wall pews round the building. The chancel was on the north side, and there was a door in the opposite side and one also at the east and west ends. In the body of church there were long, open seats free to all. A tower and spire were built at the west entrance in 1823.

The erection of the current church was begun in 1846 and the building was consecrated on May 28, 1847. While there have been additions, the church remains an excellent and very well preserved example of the Carpenter Gothic style.

St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, Mystic (1867)

Sunday, November 12th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Groton, Italianate, Mystic | No Comments »

Begun as a mission in 1859, St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Mystic was organized as a parish in 1865. That same year, the parish acquired land at what is now 15 Pearl Street for a church. The cornerstone was laid in 1866 and the first service was held on Christmas Morning, 1867. Once the church was free from its large construction debt of $9,000, the building was dedicated on St. Mark’s Day, April 25, 1873. An education wing was erected in 1962.

Ivoryton Congregational Church (1888)

Sunday, November 5th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Essex, Folk Victorian | No Comments »

In the mid-nineteenth century, Ivoryton in Essex developed as a factory village around Comstock, Cheney & Company, manufacturers of products made from ivory. The heirs of company founder Samuel Merritt Comstock, under the leadership of Harriet Comstick, erected the Comstock Memorial Chapel in 1887-1888. As a mission of the Centerbrook Congregational Church, the Chapel allowed church members in Ivoryton to attend services closer to their homes. In 1898 the building became the property of the new Ivoryton Congregational Church, which had become a separate church from the one in Centerbrook. The Ivoryton Church, located at 57 Main Street, was enlarged in 1906. In 2017, the congregation, which now has approximately 25 active members, decided to put the church building on the market. It was acquired by a developer who plans to convert the building into condominiums. The final service in the church was held on October 1, 2017. The congregation now holds services at the Essex Congregational Church.

Fishtown Chapel (1889)

Sunday, October 29th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Gothic, Mystic, Stonington, Vernacular | No Comments »

The Fishtown Chapel at Mystic Seaport was originally erected by the community of Fishtown in Mystic to serve as a place for Sunday School and prayer meetings in 1889. It took only three weeks to build. For a time around 1900 the Chapel served as a schoolhouse for Groton’s Ninth School District. It then remained unused for many decades until it was moved to Mystic Seaport in 1949. Restored, it was rededicated as a chapel in 1950. As seen in old postcards of the Chapel, it once had a steeple which has since been removed. Read the rest of this entry »