Archive for the ‘Woodbury’ Category

C. L. Adams Company (1878)

Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Vernacular, Woodbury | No Comments »

The store at 47 Main Street South in Woodbury was built in 1878. Starting out as a feed and lumber store run by Nathan Burton, the business changed ownership many times. In 1905 it took the name C. L. Adams Company for Carl L. Adams, one of the store’s owners. Adams sold his part of the business in 1920, but was then paid $60 annually for the continued use of his name. The store has continued as an animal feed and hardware store, operated since 1941 by the Newell family.

David Minor House (1770)

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Woodbury | No Comments »

The house at 100 Main Street South in Woodbury was built between 1765 and 1776 by a member of the Minor family. The sign on the house displays the name David Minor, with a date of about 1770. David’s son, Simeon Minor, inherited the land, house and barn in 1776. The house passed from the Minor family to Jabez Bacon in 1784 and to Samuel Robbins in 1818. Later owners would make extensive alterations to the house.

Rev. Noah Benedict House (1760)

Friday, July 14th, 2017 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Woodbury | No Comments »

The house at 256 Main Street South in Woodbury was built in 1760-1763 by Rev. Noah Benedict (1737-1813), who served as the third minister of Woodbury’s First Congregational Church from 1760 to 1813. He dug and stoned the well with his own hands. Rev. Benedict built another house for his son nearby in 1795 and his own home was occupied by his widow until her death in 1861. The house then passed to Nathaniel Benedict Smith, son of Rev. Benedict’s only daughter, Ruth. It was acquired in 1874 by George Crane, who sold it to Charles Harvey in 1888. The house, originally a saltbox, has been much altered over the years, with chimneys replaced and eventually removed.

Canfield Corner Pharmacy (1876)

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Second Empire, Woodbury | No Comments »

The Canfield Corner Pharmacy is a classic American drug store, complete with soda counter (although the latter is no longer functional). The pharmacy is located in a Mansard-roofed building at 2 North Main Street in Woodbury. The building was erected in 1876 as Stong’s Block by Nathaniel M. Strong, who had begun his drug business across the street in 1867. In addition to the drug store, the building contained a number of other businesses over the years and had a hall on the third floor used for meetings by various community groups. Henry H. Canfield (died 1949), who had been Stong’s head clerk, took over the business in 1900. Pharmacist Curtis Martiny and his wife Vera took over the pharmacy in 1950. After her husband’s death in 1954, Vera Taylor Martiny became a licensed pharmacist and continued the business, serving customers, including Roxbury resident Marilyn Monroe. Vera’s daughter Mary purchased the pharmacy in 1987. The building was restored after a fire in 1998. Read the rest of this entry »

Dawson’s Corner Store (1884)

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Vernacular, Woodbury | No Comments »

The building on the left in the image above is the Woodbury Town Archive Building. Next to it, on the right, is a building that was opened in 1884 as the Corner Store by G. F. Morris and Louis E. Dawson. They sold dry goods, clothing and groceries. Starting in 1889, Morris was also the postmaster, a position taken over by Dawson when Morris left for another store in Hotchkissville in 1893. The building had several additions over the years as the store continued under the management of Louis Dawson’s sons, L. Clyde and Jim Dawson. The store eventually closed in the 1940s.

Elijah Sherman House (1791)

Wednesday, November 9th, 2016 Posted in Colonial, Houses, Woodbury | No Comments »

50 Main St S., Woodbury

Not to be confused with another nearby Elijah Sherman House, the house at 50 Main Street South in Woodbury was erected by Deacon Elijah Sherman on land owned by Lee and Timothy Terrell. As related in the c. 1900 book Woodbury and the Colonial Homes:

The Sherman place is now occupied by Chas. Roswell, and the stone door step still bears the date May 19, 1791 A. D., chiseled on it. In the basement of this house, a tannery was located, later being moved across the street.

The house has been home to the Newell family since 1918.

Benjamin and George Doolittle House (1824)

Thursday, October 20th, 2016 Posted in Federal Style, Houses, Woodbury | No Comments »

Doolittle House

At 366 Main Street South and Doolittle Hill Road in Woodbury is a house built c. 1823-1824 by brothers Benjamin and George Doolittle. The brothers divided the house equally between them, including the basement (the house is on a hill and there is an entrance to it on the left side of the house, not visible in the image above), where Benjamin and George each had a Dutch oven. During the War of 1812, Benjamin Doolittle (1798-1868) was a drummer boy with the New Haven Grays. He became a cabinetmaker, manufacturing chairs in Litchfield, and moved to Woodbury in 1822. He was an active member of King Solomon’s Lodge, No. 7, of Free and Accepted Masons and of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. From 1854 he ran an express business between Woodbury and New Haven, as well as routes to other points, such as Waterbury. He died en route to New Haven in 1868. The house remained in the Doolittle family until George’s widow, Betsey Collier Moore Doolittle, died in the Blizzard of 1888.