Archive for the ‘Federal Style’ Category

Daniel Morris House (1805)

Thursday, March 26th, 2015 Posted in Branford, Federal Style, Houses | No Comments »

Daniel Morris House

Built around 1805, the Daniel Morris House in Branford originally stood on Main Street. In the late nineteenth century it was moved to its current address at 51 Bradley Street (which is why it has a high brick foundation).

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First Congregational Church, Madison (1838)

Sunday, March 22nd, 2015 Posted in Churches, Federal Style, Madison | No Comments »

First Congregational Church, Madison

The first meetinghouse in Madison was erected in 1705, on the southeast section of the town green. It had neither a bell nor a steeple and galleries were only added in 1715. A new meetinghouse was dedicated in May 1743, to which a steeple was added in 1799. The present First Congregational Church was built in the Federal style on the north part of the green in 1837-1838. As described in A Modern History of New Haven and Eastern New Haven County, Volume 1 (1918), by Everett G. Hill:

When the people built for the third time in 1838, they had the common struggle to break away from the green. There was a strong party that favored building on Deacon Hart’s lot north of the green, but so resolute was the minority that forty-seven members actually withdrew from the church in 1841, because of the change. The commanding site north of the green was chosen, and it and the building placed thereon have ever since been the pride of the people of Madison, the delight of all who visit the town. It is a building of notable architecture, acknowledged by all good judges to be one of the finest country churches of its type in New England. A handsome modern chapel was added to its equipment, on a plot just east of the green, in 1881.

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Jared Cone House (1800)

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015 Posted in Bolton, Federal Style, Houses | Comments Off

Jared Cone House

Jared Cone Sr. (1733-1807) of Bolton married Christiana Loomis on September 19, 1754. He purchased the Loomis farm in Bolton by 1768. Jared Cone and his son, Jared Cone, Jr., both served in the Revolutionary War. The father marched with the militia from Bolton to the Lexington Alarm in 1775 and the son was at the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown in 1781. Jared Cone, Jr. married Elisabeth Wells of Wethersfield in 1784. He acquired his father’s farm in 1790 and ten years later built a Federal-style house at what is now 25 Hebron Road. The house‘s rear ell appears to be much earlier, dating perhaps to c. 1755. Cone could only afford to live in the grand house for four years, eventually selling it and moving away (he died in New Hampshire). For about eight years the house was a bed and breakfast until it closed in 2003.

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Levi Deming House (1825)

Thursday, February 19th, 2015 Posted in Berlin, Federal Style, Houses | Comments Off

754 Worthington Ridge, Berlin

The Federal-style house at 754 Worthington Ridge in Berlin was built around 1825. It was owned early on by Levi Deming, a farmer.

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Oliver W. Mills House (1824)

Monday, February 2nd, 2015 Posted in Federal Style, Houses, Windsor | Comments Off

Oliver W. Mills House

Brick-making was once very important industry in Windsor and the town boasts numerous brick houses constructed in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in the Federal and Greek Revival styles. Industrial brick making in Windsor started in 1830 with the founding of the Mack Brick Company. There were also many brick makers with smaller operations, who made bricks by hand. One of these was Oliver W. Mills (1796-1866), whose primary occupation was as a farmer, but who also had a small brickworks near the Connecticut River. His brickworks have been built over, but his modest Federal-style house, constructed with his own bricks in 1824, has survived at 148 Deerfield Road in Windsor.

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New Hope Bible Way Church (1799)

Sunday, January 25th, 2015 Posted in Churches, Federal Style, Middletown | Comments Off

New Hope Bible Way Church

At 712 Main Street in Middletown is the New Hope Bible Way Church. The building, which originally stood on the west side of Main Street between College and Court Streets, was built in 1799. It was then the fourth meetinghouse of Middletown’s First Church of Christ, a Congregational society first organized in 1668. The structure has been moved twice. The first time was in 1822, when it was shifted back 8 feet as it was thought to be too close to Main Street. In 1873, after the congregation moved to a new building (the current First Church of Christ on Court Street), the old meetinghouse had its steeple removed and the structure was relocated to its present location. The original rear of the church became the new front facade facing Main Street, to which storefronts were eventually added. For a time, the former church’s audience room was used for meetings of St. Mary’s Total Abstinence and Benevolent Society. Before becoming a church again, the building housed small businesses and apartments.

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Felix Starkey House (1803)

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015 Posted in Colonial, Essex, Federal Style, Houses | Comments Off

Felix Starkey House

The house at 51 Main Street in Essex was built in 1803 by Thomas Millard, a shipcarver and housewright, and was the home of Felix Starkey from 1805 to 1856. Felix Starkey (1777-1856) was a merchant and the brother of Timothy Starkey. He married Esther Hayden. (The sign on the house reads “Timothy Starkey 1720″).

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