Archive for the ‘Coventry’ Category

John Boynton House (1800)

Thursday, October 6th, 2016 Posted in Coventry, Federal Style, Houses | No Comments »


The oldest sections of the house at 1365 Main Street in Coventry date to 1750, but the Federal-style main section, which includes a rooftop monitor, was built c. 1800. Now used as offices and remodeled for that purpose, the house is named for a prominent early-nineteenth-century resident. In 1815, John Boynton (1783-1863) started a mill that manufactured wool carding machines of his own patent. Boynton was also a deacon of the Congregational Church.

W. L. Wellwood General Store (1787)

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Coventry, Greek Revival | No Comments »

Wellwood Store

A section of the former W. L. Wellwood General Store at 1140 Main Street in Coventry dates to 1787, making it one of the oldest general store buildings in the nation. In 1820, the large Greek Revival portion was added to the original store and living quarters, which also attach to a later Italianate residence to the northeast. Another addition, containing the west wing grain room and butcher shop, was added in 1883. The Loomis family owned the store from about 1810 until 1881. After 1905 it was owned and operated by the Wellwood family. In 1974 the building went from housing a general store to becoming an antiques shop. It has more recently been the “Coventry Country Store” (as in the image above) and is currentlyCoventry Arts & Antiques.”

Charles Hanover House (1825)

Saturday, December 12th, 2015 Posted in Coventry, Houses, Vernacular | No Comments »

Charles Hanover House

Charles Hanover was a glassblower at the Coventry Glassworks, which was in operation from 1815 to 1849. The house at 941 North River Road in Coventry was built for him in 1825.

Nathaniel Root House (1809)

Thursday, November 5th, 2015 Posted in Coventry, Federal Style, Houses | No Comments »

Nathaniel Root House

Captain Nathaniel Root, Sr. (1757-1840), a farmer, was one of the original seven proprietors who in 1813 agreed to erect a glass factory in Coventry, along the Boston Post Road. The Coventry glassworks would be in operation until 1849. Root built the Federal-style house at 1046 Boston Turnpike in 1809.

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Bidwell Hotel (1822)

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015 Posted in Coventry, Greek Revival, Hotels | No Comments »

Bidwell Hotel, Coventry

In 1822 Solomon Bidwell built a three-floor hotel at 1220 Main Street in Coventry. After Solomon died in 1858, his son Nathan Lyman ran the business, adding a wing to expand the hotel. When Nathan L. Bidwell died in 1877, it passed to his son Charles (died 1881) and then to Charles’ widow Lydia (died 1918). The hotel ceased operating in 1938. The Greek Revival building has a Colonial Revival two-story open porch across its front facade, added in the early twentieth century.

Loomis-Pomeroy House (1833)

Thursday, October 8th, 2015 Posted in Coventry, Federal Style, Houses | No Comments »

Loomis-Pomeroy House

The main block of the Loomis-Pomeroy House, located at 1747 Boston Turnpike in North Coventry, is a transitional Federal-Greek Revival house. It was probably built c. 1833 by Eleazer Pomeroy (1776-1867), who had been operating a tavern in the vicinity since 1801. He deeded the house to his son George in 1843 and the Pomeroy family continued to own the house and farm until 1873. After passing through various owners, the property was acquired by James Otis Freeman in 1881. It was then owned by Freeman’s daughter Louise and her husband S. Noble Loomis and remained in the Loomis family until 1987. The Loomis farm, called Meadowbrook, extended to 100 acres, but was subdivided after 1968. Louise Loomis was librarian at the Porter Memorial Library across the street. In 1987, June Loomis bequeathed the house to the library association. It was eventually owned by the Town of Coventry, which leased to Coventry Preservation Advocacy for restoration and later sold it to support the Booth & Dimock Memorial Library.

Jacob Wilson Tavern (1735)

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015 Posted in Colonial, Coventry, Houses, Taverns & Inns | No Comments »

Jacob Wilson Tavern

At the northwest corner of the Boston Turnpike at 21 Bread & Milk Street in Coventry is a house built circa 1735 by John Wilson (1702-1773). After his death in 1773, the house passed to his son William (1729-1819), who married Sarah Rust, and his grandson Jacob (1749-1826), who married Hannah Dimmock in 1771. Jacob Wilson operated a tavern at the house from 1773 until 1817, when he sold the property to Joshua Frink.