Archive for the ‘Greek Revival’ Category

D. W. Huntington House (1830)

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017 Posted in Coventry, Federal Style, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 234 Armstrong Road in Coventry, dramatically situated on a hillside, was built c. 1830. Originally the Stanley family farmhouse, the house was later the home of D. W. Huntington, who owned a silk mill along the nearby Mill Brook in the 1860s-1880s. Originally from Montville, Huntington had moved to Coventry in his youth. He had been overseer of a cotton mill and studied civil engineering. In 1874, Huntington and William A. Hempstead patented an improvement in water-meters.

Horace W. Davis House (1850)

Friday, June 23rd, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Groton, Houses | No Comments »

The house at 40 Pearl Street in the Noank section of Groton was built circa 1850. It was the home home of Horace W. Davis, probably Horace Winthrop Davis (1823-1891) who married Harriet Ashby in 1845.

Ira Smith House (1791)

Monday, June 19th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Prospect, Vernacular | No Comments »

Ira Smith of Prospect was born in 1757 at his family homestead on Cheshire Road in Prospect. He served fifteen months in the Revolutionary War, going in place of his father, who was drafted in 1777. Ira was a private in Capt. Jesse Kimball’s company of Col. John Chandler’s 8th Connecticut Regiment. He was at Peekskill, at Germantown, detached for the defense of Fort Mifflin, and at Valley Forge. Smith later applied for a pension, giving a deatailed account of his service. After returning home, Ira Smith built the house at 61 Cheshire Road in Prospect sometime between 1779, when he married Elizabeth Judson, and 1791, when his father, Ephriam Smith, gave him 35 acres of the family farm. Ira and Ephriam were among the founders of Prospect’s Congregational Church. Ira died in 1835 and his son, John Andrew Smith, lived in the home until he died in 1878. It was then purchased by the Plumb family, who today operate Plumb Farm Flowers.

Pierpont Store (1845)

Saturday, June 17th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Greek Revival, Italianate, North Haven | No Comments »

The building at 31 State Street in North Haven was built c. 1845 by Rufus Pierpont (1818-1855), adjacent to the 1795 Pierpont Homsetead, to serve as a general store. His son, Joseph Pierpont, continued the business, was operated by the family until 1942, when it closed during World War II due to a lack of help. A Greek Revival building, it was enlarged and remodeled in the Italianate style with a storefront on the west side and a side porch and projecting bay on the south side. These alterations were the work of Solomon Linsley, a Civil War veteran and local builder in North Haven.

Charles Wolcott House (1840)

Wednesday, June 14th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Wethersfield | No Comments »

Dated to c. 1840-1850 (or perhaps as early as 1820), the hip-roofed house at 431 Wolcott Hill Road in Wethersfield was the home of Charles Wolcott [possibly Charles Wolcott (1819-1900)]. In the mid-twentieth century it was owned by William C. Stuart. The chimney has been move from its original position.

Watertown Masonic Temple (1873)

Tuesday, June 13th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Organizations, Watertown | No Comments »

According to assessor’s records, the Greek Revival building at 175 Main Street in Watertown was built in 1873. Known as the Watertown Masonic Temple, it is home to Federal Lodge No. 17. The first Masonic Lodge meeting in Watertown was held on December 22, 1790. Part of the building, with the address of 179 Main Street, is rented to a retail store. Watertown Grange #122 (organized in 1891) also meets in the building. The nomination for the Watertown Center Historic District lists the building as the Grange Hall and provides a construction date of c. 1850.

South Britain Academy (1835)

Monday, May 29th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Schools, Southbury | No Comments »

The house at 698 South Britain Road in South Britain, Southbury was built c. 1835-1840 as a school called the South Britain Academy. The Academy, started around 1820, had a library and an Institute for Elocution and Debating. The school had closed by the 1860s and the building was converted into a residence. In 1922 it was acquired by Henry McCarthy, a merchant, and his wife, Helen McCarthy, who worked as secretary of Southbury’s board of Selectmen from 1943-1965 and then worked for the town’s social services office.