Archive for the ‘Greek Revival’ Category

Richard Cruttenden House (1849)

Friday, November 20th, 2015 Posted in Greek Revival, Guilford, Houses | No Comments »

Richard Cruttenden House

Much altered over the years, the house at 65 Fair Street in Guilford was built in 1849 by Richard Cruttenden. He was descended from Abraham Cruttenden, one of the original settlers of Guilford.

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Hadlyme Congregational Church (1840)

Sunday, November 1st, 2015 Posted in Churches, East Haddam, Greek Revival | No Comments »

Hadlyme Congregational Church

As related in A Statistical Account of the County of Middlesex, in Connecticut (1819) by David Dudley Field:

The [Ecclesiastical] Society of Hadlyme was incorporated in Oct. 1742, and was thus called, because it was made partly from East-Haddam and partly from Lyme. The church was organized, with ten male members, on the 26th of June 1745, and on the 18th of the succeeding September, the Rev. Grindall Rawson, who had been minister several years at South-Hadley, Mass. was installed their pastor.

The current church, built in 1840 and located on Town Street (Route 82) in East Haddam, is the second building to be constructed on the site.

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Bidwell Hotel (1822)

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015 Posted in Coventry, Greek Revival, Hotels | No Comments »

Bidwell Hotel, Coventry

In 1822 Solomon Bidwell built a three-floor hotel at 1220 Main Street in Coventry. After Solomon died in 1858, his son Nathan Lyman ran the business, adding a wing to expand the hotel. When Nathan L. Bidwell died in 1877, it passed to his son Charles (died 1881) and then to Charles’ widow Lydia (died 1918). The hotel ceased operating in 1938. The Greek Revival building has a Colonial Revival two-story open porch across its front facade, added in the early twentieth century.

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Deacon Turner House (1849)

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Willington | No Comments »

Deacon Turner House

The main part of the house at 243 Tolland Turnpike in Willington, in the Willington Common Historic District, was designed by architect Augustus Treusdel of Coventry and erected by builder Emery Williams for Deacon John Turner. This 1849 Greek Revival section was added to an earlier single-story building. Deacon John Turner was a stockholder in the Willington Glass Company. George V. Smith, who owned the house in the early twentieth century, was a lawyer and editor of the Connecticut Farmer.

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Francis Jelliff House (1839)

Monday, September 28th, 2015 Posted in Fairfield, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

Francis Jelliff House

The house at 212 Center Street in Southport was built by Francis Jelliff, a carpenter and builder. Much altered in later years, the house has since been restored to its original Greek Revival style. He also constructed another house in the 1870s for his son Charles E Jelliff, which was moved in the 1950s to 154 Taintor Drive to make way for the construction of I-95. Francis Jelliff is described in the Commemorative Biographical Record of Fairfield County, Connecticut (1899). He was

born December 8, 1816, at Westport, Conn., a son of David and Polly (Pike) Jelliff, the latter of whom was born in Southport, Conn. They had their home in Westport, where they reared their family of three children: Francis, Eliphalet and Mary. Of these, Eliphalet died young, and Mary married Sellick Sherman. Francis learned the trade of carpenter when a boy, serving a long apprenticeship, as was customary in those days, and followed that business throughout life at Southport, after a period spent in journeyman work in New York and elsewhere, among other jobs putting up cabins on vessels. In all respects he was a superior mechanic. Prior to his marriage he built his home on the corner of Pequot and Center streets, where he spent the balance of his life. In connection with carpentering he did a considerable amount of business in building and contracting, erecting many buildings in Southport and other towns, doing the entire work on the Southport Savings Bank, building the school house in the borough, and was a partner in the construction of both the Episcopal church and Congregational church. Beginning life a poor boy, he, by industry, perseverance, honesty of purpose and economy, became wealthy, at his death leaving a handsome competence.

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Andover Congregational Chapel (1860)

Sunday, September 27th, 2015 Posted in Andover, Churches, Greek Revival, Organizations | No Comments »


Adjacent to the Congregational Church in Andover is the Congregational Chapel. According to the nomination for the Andover Center Historic District, it was built c. 1860, but the Town of Andover’s website calls it the Conference House and explains that it was built not long after the neighboring church, which was erected in 1833. The Conference House was constructed with timbers and other materials salvaged from the church’s first meeting house, built c. 1748. A versatile building, it was used for public meetings, elections and the local court until the Town Hall was built in 1893; as the town’s library from 1882 to 1927; as a town schoolhouse from 1888 to 1903; and as a meeting place for The Grange and other local organizations.

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Nehemiah Payne House (1839)

Thursday, September 24th, 2015 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, New London | No Comments »

28 Starr Street

On the other side of Starr Street in New London from the row of houses built in 1839 by John Bishop is another Greek Revival house built the same year at 28 Starr Street. Unlike the the Bishop houses, it does not have its gable end to the street, although it similarly displays a later Italianate alteration in its door hood. It was the second house on Starr Street built by Nehemiah Payne.

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