Archive for the ‘Greek Revival’ Category

273 South Main Street, Cheshire (1850)

Saturday, April 25th, 2015 Posted in Cheshire, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

273 South Main Street, Cheshire

The brick house at 273 South Main Street in Cheshire was built c. 1850. It is transitional in style between the Greek Revival and the Italianate Villa. Two owners of the house in the mid-nineteenth century were E. Talmadge and U. P. Hokum.

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Giles Barber House (1825)

Monday, April 20th, 2015 Posted in Federal Style, Greek Revival, Houses, Windsor | No Comments »

Giles Barber House

The Giles Barber House is an “L”-shaped plan Federal/Greek Revival style residence at 411-413 Windsor Avenue in Windsor. It was built c. 1825 using bricks made nearby, at brickyards on the east side of Windsor Avenue.

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Reuben Stone House (1769)

Saturday, April 18th, 2015 Posted in Colonial, Greek Revival, Guilford, Houses | No Comments »

Reuben Stone House

In 1769, Reuben Stone built the house at 22 Broad Street in Guilford, near the home of his brother, Caleb Stone. Reuben Stone (1726-1804) was a supporter of the Revolutionary War who procured supplies for the soldiers. In 1842, the Greek Revival entryway was added and the house was altered from one-and-a-half stories with a steeper roof to two-stories. The house was later owned by Leverett C. Stone (1819-1892) and other Stone descendants.

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Worthington Ecclesiastical Society Parsonage (1845)

Monday, April 6th, 2015 Posted in Berlin, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

Worthington Ecclesiastical Society Parsonage

On Worthington Ridge in Berlin are two similar houses, built around 1845. Both houses are described by Catharine Melinda North in her History of Berlin (1916):

The two houses standing next south of the new academy were built by Elishama Brandegee, the father of Dr. Elishama Brandegee. The one nearest the academy, long the home of Dr. Brandegee and his family, was designed for the teacher and was occupied by Ariel Parish. The other, now the parsonage of the Second Congregational Church, strange to relate, was built to be used as a parsonage by the Rev. James McDonald, who was settled here 1835-1837.

The Second Congregational Church, now the Berlin Congregational Church, began as the Worthington Ecclesiastical Society. The former parsonage is at 850 Worthington Ridge.

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Ledyard Congregational Church (1843)

Sunday, April 5th, 2015 Posted in Churches, Greek Revival, Ledyard | No Comments »

Ledyard Congregational Church

Happy Easter! The origins of the Ledyard Congregational Church are described in the History of the town of Ledyard, 1650-1900 (1901) by Rev. John Avery:

The town of Ledyard was set off from Groton and incorporated in 1836. Previous to this the territory which it covers was for many years known as the Second or North Parish in Groton. The Ecclesiastical Society in this North Parish was organized in 1725, with six or seven members, and at once took measures to find, by actual measurement, the exact centre of the parish as the proper place for a meeting-house. That centre was found to be “in the north-east corner of Stephen Morgan’s goat pasture.” Upon the spot thus designated the erection of a meeting-house was begun in 1727. The present church edifice stands partly on the same ground, but a little further back from the highway. The Congregational Church was organized in 1729. The early history of the Church for about 80 years, is veiled in obscurity. During the last 39 of these 80 years the Church had no settled pastor, and at sometime in this period became extinct; and its records, if it ever had any, have been lost.

The situation was rectified beginning in 1808, when the church began raising funds to repair its meeting-house. In 1811 the Ecclesiastical Society again had a settled minister, Rev. Timothy Tuttle, who served as pastor for fifty-three years. It was during his pastorate that the old meeting-house was taken down and the current church building was constructed in 1843.

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Butler-Simpson House (1838)

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015 Posted in East Hampton, Greek Revival, Houses | No Comments »

Butler-Simpson House

Middle Haddam in East Hampton was a shipbuilding center in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century and Samuel B. Butler made pulleys and other hardware for the shipbuilding industry. He built a Greek Revival house at 30 Knowles Road in 1838. It was purchased by Captain Edward M. Simpson in 1855. He was a steamboat pilot on the Connecticut River and was captain of the famous steamboat City of Hartford. His daughter later had a house nearby.

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Alley House (1853)

Friday, March 27th, 2015 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Plymouth | No Comments »

Alley House

The Greek Revival house at 572 Main Street in Plymouth is home to the Plymouth Historical Society. Their website states that it was built in the mid-nineteenth century. Another article gives the date as 1853. It was built by A.C. Shelton, of the Shelton and Tuttle Carriage Company, for his niece. The property was later known as the Burr Farm and then belonged to the Alley family.

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