Archive for the ‘Greek Revival’ Category

Alfred Harger House (1830)

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Oxford | No Comments »

The house at 329 Quaker Farms Road in Oxford was built in 1830 by Alfred Harger (1804-1887), the year he married Ruth Beardslee. Harger was a leading surveyor in the region, having learned the trade from his father-in-law Lemuel Beardslee. The house remained in the family for generations.

Baptist Parsonage, Willington (1830)

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017 Posted in Federal Style, Greek Revival, Houses, Willington | No Comments »

The house at 7 Common Road in Willington was built in 1830 by Albert Sharp and funded by a private association to provide a residence for the minister of the nearby Baptist Church, now the Federated Church of Willington. Ownership was transferred to the trustees of the Baptist Church in 1901. The building was enlarged in 1913.

Gales Ferry School House (1868)

Friday, March 17th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Ledyard, Schools | No Comments »

The community of Gales Ferry in Ledyard was served for generations by a one-room schoolhouse. The surviving school building, erected in 1868, is the third to have stood on the same site (4 Hurlbutt Road) since 1750. It was used as a school until a new two-room building (now the Gales Ferry Community Center) was opened in January 1929. The former Gales Ferry School House was later restored by the Ledyard Historical Society.

Living Proof Church (1848)

Sunday, March 12th, 2017 Posted in Ashford, Churches, Greek Revival | No Comments »

A Baptist church was established in Ashford in the village of Westford in 1780. In 1848 a new church was built in Warrenville section of town, as Richard M. Bayles describes in his History of Windham County, Connecticut (1889):

John Warren, Esq., manifested much anxiety to have a Baptist church organized in the western part of Ashford, in a village on the turnpike from Hartford to Boston and Providence. The First, or as it was often called, the Knowlton meeting house, was not considered so central, nor easy of access as many thought desirable. But the people in the vicinity of the old church were greatly opposed to giving up worship in their sanctuary, and continued for a time to worship there after another congregation was formed in “Pompey Hollow,” as the place was then called. Mr. Warren offered a fund to support worship in the Hollow, and the name of the village was changed to Warrenville. A church was organized January 22d, 1848[.]

The meeting house was completed that same year (1848). Later called the United Baptist Church, it is now known as Living Proof Church.

Melrose School (1850)

Friday, March 10th, 2017 Posted in East Windsor, Greek Revival, Schools | No Comments »

About 1850 the town of East Windsor organized its schools into twelve districts. The 7th District School in the village of Melrose was built around that time and remained in use as a school until 1938. The Melrose Library was also located here from its founding in the 1930s until it closed in 1950. After that the building, located at 195 Melrose Road, was used by local community groups as a meeting place. In more recent years it was restored by the Melrose School Restoration Committee. The building’s Neoclassical front portico is a later addition that fits in well with the school’s Greek Revival architecture.

Daniel Griswold House (1839)

Saturday, February 25th, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Manchester | No Comments »

The Greek Revival-style house at 270 West Center Street in Manchester is thought to have been built in 1839 by Daniel Griswold, who had many land transactions in the area.

J. Boardman Smith House (1840)

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, North Haven | No Comments »

The ell of the house at 30 State Street in North Haven was built in the eighteenth century. This original home became a side-wing when the larger Greek Revival section was built in the 1840s. It was the residence of J. Boardman Smith and is thought to have once been the home of Oscar Benson, chauffeur of Frank L. Stiles.