Archive for the ‘Italianate’ Category

351 Main Street South, Woodbury (1849)

Thursday, April 16th, 2015 Posted in Houses, Italianate, Woodbury | No Comments »

351 Main Street South, Woodbury

The house at 351 Main Street South in Woodbury was built in 1849. In recent years the house served as a supervised home for people with traumatic brain injuries. The house was damaged in a fire on May 30, 2014.

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Lewis Block (1854)

Saturday, April 11th, 2015 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Italianate, Meriden | No Comments »

29 West Main 1854

Though it has a front facade dating to c. 1870 and it was later much altered on the first floor, the building at 29 West Main Street in Meriden is thought to have been built in 1854. Known as the Lewis Block, should not be confused with the larger Hall and Lewis Block at the corner of Colony and West Main Streets.

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David Lyman II Homestead (1864)

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015 Posted in Gothic, Houses, Italianate, Middlefield | No Comments »

David Lyman II House

In 1741 John Lyman (1717-1763) purchased the first parcel of the land in Middlefield that his descendents would develop and that is part of Lyman Orchards today. John’s great-grandson, David Lyman II (1820-1871) was a prosperous farmer who did much to develop the Town of Middlefield. He co-founded the Metropolitan Washing Machine Company and brought the Air Line railroad to Middlefield. In 1859 David Lyman II added a rear wing to a c. 1785 house, built on the property by his grandfather, David Lyman I. In 1862 he removed the 1785 house and the following year began construction of a new home on the site, completed in 1864. Designed by New Haven architect Rufus G. Russell, the new Lyman Homestead maintained a Georgian-type form but elaborated with the stylistic elements of the Italianate country villa and Gothic Revival cottage. The house, at 5 Lyman Road in Middlefield, has continued to be owned by the Lyman family and since 2000 has been available to rent for events.

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Glastenbury Knitting Company (1860)

Thursday, March 19th, 2015 Posted in Glastonbury, Industrial, Italianate | No Comments »

Glastenbury Knitting Company

The Glastenbury Knitting Company (which, like the town where it was founded, later changed the spelling of its name to “Glastonbury“) was founded in 1855 by Addison L. Clark. The company produced men’s wool underwear (long johns, called “union suits” during the Civil War), reaching its peak during World War I when it produced 400,000 pairs for the U.S. army. Having acquired the Eagle Manufacturing Company woolen mills in Glastonbury 1855, the company built its first mill (c. 1860), just upstream on Salmon Brook, at the outlet to a small mill pond called Addison Pond. A fire in 1892 destroyed part of the mill, but Clark soon rebuilt and in 1897, a year after his death, the surrounding mill village of Eagleville was renamed Addison in his honor. The mill itself was expanded over the years, until about 1910. The company went out of business in 1936, during the Great Depression. The old mill was later used as a warehouse, but in 2005 it was acquired by developers who have converted it into upscale apartments under the name Addison Mill Apartments. The developers recreated a tower, destroyed by fire in the late 1930s, that had stood at the building’s western end. The new tower serves as a stairwell.

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Warren Doolittle House (1860)

Friday, March 13th, 2015 Posted in Cheshire, Houses, Italianate | No Comments »

Warren Doolittle House (1860)

Warren Doolittle (1813-1870), who ran a farm and was secretary and treasurer of the Cheshire Manufacturing Company, was one of Cheshire’s wealthiest citizens. One of two houses he owned on West Main Street in Cheshire was an Italianate villa (345 West Main Street) that was built c. 1860.

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Second Henry Skinner House (1867)

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 Posted in East Hampton, Houses, Italianate | No Comments »

Henry Skinner House

Henry Skinner was a wheelwright who owned a sawmill and gristmill on Pocotopaug Stream in East Hampton. In the 1850s, he built a Greek Revival house at 66 Skinner Street, across the street from his mills. He sold the house in 1867, the same year he completed a new and larger house, built in the Italianate style at 70 Skinner Street. His new house remained in his family until 1919, when it was divided into apartments.

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Stiles Curtis House (1832)

Thursday, January 29th, 2015 Posted in Houses, Italianate, Norwalk | No Comments »

Stiles Curtis House

The Stiles Curtis House is located at 3 Park Street across from the Green in Norwalk. It was built in 1832 and updated in 1869 (the Nomination for the Norwalk Green Historic District lists a date of 1853). A merchant, Stiles Curtis (1805-1882) was a Warden of the Borough of Norwalk (1845-1853) and President of the Bank of Norwalk (1875-1892).

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