Archive for the ‘Italianate’ Category

Cummings House (1855)

Thursday, March 30th, 2017 Posted in Coventry, Houses, Italianate | No Comments »

The Cummings House, located at 984 Main Street in Coventry, was built c. 1855. The house has a typical New England gable-roofed form that goes back to the Colonial period, but the detailing is distinctively Italianate in style. The 1857 map of Tolland County identifies the owner of the house as J. Cummings and the 1869 atlas of Hartford and Tolland Counties indicates it is owned by William M. Cummings.

Edgar and Anna Mosier House (1872)

Monday, March 27th, 2017 Posted in Houses, Italianate, Windsor | No Comments »

Built circa 1872, the house at 1875 Poquonock Avenue in Windsor is a dramatic example of the Italianate style. It was built by Edgar Mosier and his widow Anna lived there into the early twentieth century. It was then inherited by their son Frank.

Kensington Congregational Church Parsonage (1870)

Thursday, March 16th, 2017 Posted in Berlin, Houses, Italianate | No Comments »

The house at 14 Robbins Road in the Kensington section of the town of Berlin was perhaps built c. 1860 (it is so listed in Berlin property records). The lot (with no dwelling mentioned) was sold to the Kensington Ecclesiastical Society by Edward Cowles in 1870 and it has since served as the parsonage of the Kensington Congregational Church. A volume released to celebrate the two hundredth anniversary of the church in 1912 indicates that, instead of a preexisting house,

The present parsonage was built in 1869-70. A debt of $4100, incurred in part on account of the parsonage, was raised by subscription in 1871.

The parsonage is already noted on the map of Berlin in the 1869 Hartford County Atlas by Baker & Tilden.

Kenyon Mill (1863)

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017 Posted in Coventry, Industrial, Italianate | No Comments »

The town of Coventry was once home to a number of water-powered mills. One in South Coventry, known as the Kenyon Mill, was built next to a mill pond in 1863, replacing an earlier mill (built in 1836) that had suffered a major fire. The mill was acquired by C. H. Kenyon from S. R. Moredock, manufacturer of satinet, in 1864. Kenyon had begun making woolen pants (Kentucky jeans) in Coventry in the 1840s and by 1870 his mill had developed into a major enterprise with over seventy employees. He later made ladies dress flannels. After Kenyon, a series of textile manufacturers occupied the mill, ending with National Silk, manufacturers of Tioga yarn, which occupied the building from 1934 until 1972. In more recent years the town was seeking proposals for the adaptive reuse of the mill. In 2007 it was acquired by the Corporation for Independent Living, which has converted it into condominium units known as Kenyon Falls.

George J. Capewell House (1870)

Friday, February 24th, 2017 Posted in Apartment Buildings, Hartford, Houses, Italianate | No Comments »

George J. Capewell (1843-1919) invented an automatic process to make horse nails. In 1881 he started the Capewell Horse Nail Company in Hartford. His residence in the city was an Italianate-style house at 903 Asylum Avenue, built in 1870. The house, long owned by the Holcombe family, was later converted to apartments.

Winthrop House (1848)

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2017 Posted in Hotels, Italianate, Norwalk | No Comments »

The building that is called Winthrop House, at 166 Rowayton Avenue in Rowayton, Norwalk, was built in 1848 by Charles L. Raymond as a a four-story summer hotel. It has had many names, being called the Fairview Hotel by the turn of the century. It was a private home around the time of World War I, but then became a hotel again under various names over the years: Colonial Inn (1926), Pleasant Inn (1930) and Rowayton Inn (1935). During the Second World War it was purchased by the Bassler brothers. At the start of the twenty-first century there were plans to demolish the building, but in 2005 the Norwalk Preservation Trust worked with developer Andrew Glazer, the Rowayton Historical Society, the Rowayton Community Association and the Norwalk Planning and Zoning Office to restore the exterior to its nineteenth-century appearance. The interior was converted into three luxury condominiums.

Levi Frisbie House (1819)

Monday, February 20th, 2017 Posted in Branford, Federal Style, Houses, Italianate | No Comments »

According to the sign on the house at 196-200 Thimble Islands Road in the Stony Creek section of Branford, the building was erected in 1819 by Levi Frisbie. The house has been much added to over the years, additions including an Italianate cupola. In the 1860s it was the home and tin shop of Martin Bishop.