Canfield Corner Pharmacy (1876)

March 28th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Second Empire, Woodbury | No Comments »

The Canfield Corner Pharmacy is a classic American drug store, complete with soda counter (although the latter is no longer functional). The pharmacy is located in a Mansard-roofed building at 2 North Main Street in Woodbury. The building was erected in 1876 as Stong’s Block by Nathaniel M. Strong, who had begun his drug business across the street in 1867. In addition to the drug store, the building contained a number of other businesses over the years and had a hall on the third floor used for meetings by various community groups. Henry H. Canfield (died 1949), who had been Stong’s head clerk, took over the business in 1900. Pharmacist Curtis Martiny and his wife Vera took over the pharmacy in 1950. After her husband’s death in 1954, Vera Taylor Martiny became a licensed pharmacist and continued the business, serving customers, including Roxbury resident Marilyn Monroe. Vera’s daughter Mary purchased the pharmacy in 1987. The building was restored after a fire in 1998. Read the rest of this entry »

Edgar and Anna Mosier House (1872)

March 27th, 2017 Posted in Houses, Italianate, Windsor | No Comments »

Built circa 1872, the house at 1875 Poquonock Avenue in Windsor is a dramatic example of the Italianate style. It was built by Edgar Mosier and his widow Anna lived there into the early twentieth century. It was then inherited by their son Frank.

Advent Chapel, Prospect (1886)

March 26th, 2017 Posted in Churches, Folk Victorian, Prospect, Stick Style | No Comments »

Adventists began meeting in the Town of Prospect about 1850 and in 1886 built a chapel on the Green. As described by J.L. Rockey in his History of New Haven County (1892):

The Adventist chapel, at the Center, which is a small but not unattractive frame building, affords a place of worship for members of that faith. It was built within the past six years. The meetings previous to that time were held in private houses, at “Rag Hollow” and other localities. Moses Chandler was one of the most active in the latter movement to give the denomination a permanent place in the town, and the meetings were for a time held at his house. Other members belong to the Tuttle, Tyler, Hotchkiss and Beecher families. In 1890 there were about a score of members, and Seth Woodruff was the minister.

About 1900 the Prospect congregation merged with an Adventist church in Waterbury. Their former chapel, located at 10 Center Street, became the Chapel school house and then the Prospect Senior Center.

Nathaniel Hall House (1770)

March 25th, 2017 Posted in Federal Style, Guilford, Houses | No Comments »

The Nathaniel Hall House (perhaps named for this Nathaniel Hall?), located at 48 State Street in Guilford, was built c. 1770 and has been much altered over the years. The second floor is thought to have been added around 1810, at which time the house probably acquired its current Federal-style detailing. An owner of the house in the 1980s removed the c. 1810 front porch and various later Victorian-era alterations.

Augustus Post House (1826)

March 24th, 2017 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Federal Style, Hebron, Houses | No Comments »

The large Federal-style brick house at 4 Main Street (the corner of Routes 66 and 85) in Hebron was built c. 1820-1826 by Augustus Post, who was engaged in some kind of manufacturing. He soon sold the large residence and it passed through a series of owners that included Dr. John S. Peters and his business partner Abner Hendee. Peters was Governor of Connecticut from 1831 to 1833. In the late nineteenth century the house was acquired by W. S. Hewitt, who used it for his general store and post office. At some point the house was extended on the north side with a frame addition. The west side of the house has an entrance with a twentieth-century shed-roofed portico and the south side entrance was once altered to function as the storefront. The Hewitt family owned the house into the 1970s and it is commonly known as the Hewitt House. In 1978 the house was converted into office space. At that time the current Federal-style entrance on the south side was created.

Alfred Harger House (1830)

March 23rd, 2017 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Oxford | No Comments »

The house at 329 Quaker Farms Road in Oxford was built in 1830 by Alfred Harger (1804-1887), the year he married Ruth Beardslee. Harger was a leading surveyor in the region, having learned the trade from his father-in-law Lemuel Beardslee. The house remained in the family for generations.

Baptist Parsonage, Willington (1830)

March 22nd, 2017 Posted in Federal Style, Greek Revival, Houses, Willington | No Comments »

The house at 7 Common Road in Willington was built in 1830 by Albert Sharp and funded by a private association to provide a residence for the minister of the nearby Baptist Church, now the Federated Church of Willington. Ownership was transferred to the trustees of the Baptist Church in 1901. The building was enlarged in 1913.