Timothy Stevens, Jr. House (1743)

November 27th, 2014 Posted in Colonial, Glastonbury, Houses | No Comments »

1179 Main St., Glastonbury

Happy Thanksgiving! The house at 1179 Main Street in Glastonbury is associated with Timothy Stevens, Jr. (1705-1746), who may have built it in 1743 on land that he had acquired from his father, Rev. Timothy Stevens. The house has also been given the later date of 1763. In the twentieth century the house was part of Red Hill Farm.

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A.F. & IP. Wood Building (1900)

November 26th, 2014 Posted in Commercial Buildings, Tudor Revival, West Haven | No Comments »

A.F. & IP. Wood Building

At 519-529 Campbell Avenue in West Haven is a three-story Tudor Revival commercial building erected in 1900. It was built by the brothers (or father and son?), Alonzo Felton Wood and James P. Wood, who operated a drug store on the first floor.

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Poli Palace, Majestic Theater and Savoy Hotel (1922)

November 25th, 2014 Posted in Bridgeport, Hotels, Neoclassical, Theaters | No Comments »

Poli Palace, Majestic Theater and Savoy Hotel, Bridgeport

In downtown Bridgeport is a vacant and dilapidated 13-acre building complex, which occupies a city block. Ghost hunters are very interested in the building, which was possibly built on a Native American burial ground. The Beaux Arts structure, built in 1922, was once home to the Poli Palace, the Majestic Theater and the Savoy Hotel. The Poli Palace was built by theater impresario Sylvester Z. Poli as a vaudeville house. Mae West appeared at the theater in 1927. It was the largest theater in Connecticut and continued in use (later renamed Loew’s Palace Theater) until 1975. The Majestic Theater was smaller than the Poli Palace. It was in operation as a movie theater until 1971. Both theaters were designed by Thomas W. Lamb. Between the two theaters was the 109-room Savoy Hotel. In 1935 the Prohibition-era gangster and bootlegger Dutch Schultz moved to the Stratfield Hotel across the street for several months after two trials for tax evasion in New York State. It is wondered if he was involved in the murder of two people in the second floor lobby of the Savoy during this period. A month after leaving Bridgeport Dutch Shultz was gunned down in Newark, New Jersey. The city is seeking to redevelop the property.

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Scranton Memorial Library (1901)

November 24th, 2014 Posted in Libraries, Madison, Neoclassical | No Comments »

Scranton Memorial Library

A subscription library in East Guilford (now Madison), called the “Farmers’ Library,” had existed from 1792 until the 1860s. A new Madison Library Association was formed in 1878. The library’s collection was housed in various places in town until it was lost in a fire in 1895. Eighteen books survived (those checked out at the time of the fire) and the Library Association soon resumed operations. A permanent home for the library was built at 801 Boston Post Road on the corner of Wall Street in Madison in 1900 by Miss Mary Eliza Scranton, who offered the fully furnished building to the town. The library was designed by Henry Bacon, later the architect of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. In 1901, the Library Association was dissolved and the E.C. Scranton Memorial Library was incorporated.

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First Church of Christ, Scientist, Norwalk (1935)

November 23rd, 2014 Posted in Churches, Colonial Revival, Norwalk | No Comments »

Former First Church of Christ, Scientist, Norwalk

At 455 West Avenue in Norwalk, at the corner of Butler Street, is a former church that was later converted into a retail store. It was built as the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The first services were held in the building on October 28, 1935 and the church’s dedication services were held on December 29, 1935.

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Sarah Vincent House (1850)

November 22nd, 2014 Posted in Greek Revival, Houses, Ledyard, Vernacular, Victorian Eclectic | No Comments »

63 Hurlbut Rd., Gales Ferry

In the first half of the early nineteenth century, a store occupied the lot at 63 Hurlbut Road in Gales Ferry in Ledyard. Starting in 1831, the store was owned by Samuel and Ira Vincent. At Samuel‘s death in 1837, his widow Martha sold off the store goods. She owned the property until 1843 when it was inherited by Ira’s widow, Sarah Baker Vincent (1802-1885). Around 1850, she built a house in place of the store.

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Capt. James Loomis House (1828)

November 21st, 2014 Posted in Federal Style, Greek Revival, Houses, Windsor | No Comments »

Capt. James Loomis House

The brick house at 881 Windsor Avenue in Windsor was built around 1825-1828 by Capt. James Loomis. A transitional Federal/Greek Revival house, it is one of several in the vicinity built by members of the Loomis family.

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